24

This looks like a bug in lifting to null of operands on generic structs.

Consider the following dummy struct, that overrides operator==:

struct MyStruct
{
    private readonly int _value;
    public MyStruct(int val) { this._value = val; }

    public override bool Equals(object obj) { return false; }
    public override int GetHashCode() { return base.GetHashCode(); }

    public static bool operator ==(MyStruct a, MyStruct b) { return false; }
    public static bool operator !=(MyStruct a, MyStruct b) { return false; }
}

Now consider the following expressions:

Expression<Func<MyStruct, MyStruct, bool>> exprA   = 
    (valueA, valueB) => valueA == valueB;

Expression<Func<MyStruct?, MyStruct?, bool>> exprB = 
    (nullableValueA, nullableValueB) => nullableValueA == nullableValueB;

Expression<Func<MyStruct?, MyStruct, bool>> exprC  = 
    (nullableValueA, valueB) => nullableValueA == valueB;

All three compile and run as expected.

When they're compiled (using .Compile()) they produce the following code (paraphrased to English from the IL):

  1. The first expression that takes only MyStruct (not nullable) args, simply calls op_Equality (our implementation of operator ==)

  2. The second expression, when compiled, produces code that checks each argument to see if it HasValue. If both don't (both equal null), returns true. If only one has a value, returns false. Otherwise, calls op_Equality on the two values.

  3. The third expression checks the nullable argument to see if it has a value - if not, returns false. Otherwise, calls op_Equality.

So far so good.

Next step: do the exact same thing with a generic type - change MyStruct to MyStruct<T> everywhere in the definition of the type, and change it to MyStruct<int> in the expressions.

Now the third expression compiles but throws a runtime exception InvalidOperationException with the following message:

The operands for operator 'Equal' do not match the parameters of method 'op_Equality'.

I would expect generic structs to behave exactly the same as non-generic ones, with all the nullable-lifting described above.

So my questions are:

  1. Why is there a difference between generic and non-generic structs?
  2. What is the meaning of this exception?
  3. Is this a bug in C#/.NET?

The full code for reproducing this is available on this gist.

2
  • 1
    Could you post your modified code as well? It looks like you might have missed a spot when copy-pasting MyStruct<int> in place of MyStruct. Commented May 28, 2013 at 17:25
  • 1
    I've added a gist with the full code, also added a link at the end of the question.
    – sinelaw
    Commented May 28, 2013 at 17:26

2 Answers 2

22

The short answer is: yes, that's a bug. I've put a minimal repro and a short analysis below.

My apologies. I wrote a lot of that code and so it was likely my bad.

I have sent a repro off to the Roslyn development, test and program management teams. I doubt this reproduces in Roslyn, but they'll verify that it does not and decide whether this makes the bar for a C# 5 service pack.

Feel free to enter an issue on connect.microsoft.com as well if you want it tracked there as well.


Minimal repro:

using System;
using System.Linq.Expressions;
struct S<T>
{
    public static bool operator ==(S<T> a, S<T> b) { return false; }
    public static bool operator !=(S<T> a, S<T> b) { return false; }
}
class Program
{
    static void Main()
    {
        Expression<Func<S<int>?, S<int>, bool>> x = (a, b) => a == b;
    }
}

The code that is generated in the minimal repro is equivalent to

ParameterExpression pa = Expression.Parameter(typeof(S<int>?), "a");
ParameterExpression pb = Expression.Parameter(typeof(S<int>), "b");
Expression.Lambda<Func<S<int>?, S<int>, bool>>(
    Expression.Equal(pa, pb, false, infoof(S<int>.op_Equality)
    new ParameterExpression[2] { pa, pb } );

Where infoof is a fake operator that gets a MethodInfo for the given method.

The correct code would be:

ParameterExpression pa = Expression.Parameter(typeof(S<int>?), "a");
ParameterExpression pb = Expression.Parameter(typeof(S<int>), "b");
Expression.Lambda<Func<S<int>?, S<int>, bool>>(
    Expression.Equal(pa, Expression.Convert(pb, typeof(S<int>?), false, infoof(S<int>.op_Equality)
    new ParameterExpression[2] { pa, pb } );

The Equal method cannot deal with one nullable, one non-nullable operands. It requires that either both are nullable or neither is.

(Note that the false is correct. This Boolean controls whether the result of a lifted equality is a lifted Boolean; in C# it is not, in VB it is.)

5
  • Once again, thanks Eric. I've opened a bug on connect.
    – sinelaw
    Commented May 28, 2013 at 17:34
  • 10
    Allow me to also comment that without quick responses like these, our team in the past would wait months or even years for a proper clarification on Connect, during which we implemented workarounds that may or may not be correct. I hope that someone still at Microsoft will make fast responses an official policy.
    – sinelaw
    Commented May 28, 2013 at 17:38
  • @sinelaw: You're welcome. The Roslyn team confirms to me that this does repro in C# 5 but does not repro in Roslyn by the way. See Neal's answer. Commented May 28, 2013 at 22:32
  • You tease with the infoof operator, Eric. Any hope this is a portent of good things to come in C#?
    – MgSam
    Commented May 31, 2013 at 14:18
  • Interesting. This code also reproduces the bug: using System; using System.Linq.Expressions; static class Program { static ArraySegment<string> A; static ArraySegment<string>? B; static void Main() { Expression<Func<bool>> e = () => A == B; } } By the way, it can also happen when the struct is non-generic but is nested inside a generic class. Commented Jun 10, 2013 at 8:30
5

Yes, this bug is gone in Roslyn (the compiler under development). We'll see about the existing product.

0

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service and acknowledge you have read our privacy policy.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.