4

Should I close the statement before the connection? And the resultset before the statement? Or is it all the other way around?

Connection conn = null;
Statement st = null;
Resultset rs = null;

try {
    // Do stuff

} catch (SQLException e) {
    // Do stuff
}
finally {
    if (rs != null) rs.close();
    if (st != null) st.close();
    if (conn != null) conn.close();         
}

Or

Connection conn = null;
Statement st = null;
Resultset rs = null;

try {
    // Do stuff

} catch (SQLException e) {
    // Do stuff
}
finally {
    if (conn != null) conn.close();         
    if (st != null) st.close();
    if (rs != null) rs.close();
}
  • 4
    The rule is simple: close in the reverse order of opening. After closing the connection there will be no point in closing the statement. – Marko Topolnik May 28 '13 at 20:07
  • 2
    Be careful: void close() throws SQLException, each close() must be in its own try/catch – Aubin May 28 '13 at 20:08
  • In general, you should close resources as LIFO -- last-in-first-out. So, the first thing you open (connection) should be the last thing closed. The first method makes more sense. – Gordon Linoff May 28 '13 at 20:08
  • 1
    Ideally a compliant JDBC driver, connection pool etc will close the ResultSet, Statement etc when you close the Connection; but unfortunately the reality is this doesn't always happen. – Mark Rotteveel May 28 '13 at 20:16
  • @Aubin or wrap the close in a method. if your program is terminating and it doesn't close a DB connection, it's not a big deal because when the JVM dies, so does that resource. If your program needs to continue running, it's an issue because your leaked resources will live on. – SnakeDoc May 28 '13 at 20:26
7

Close the result set, then the statement, then the connection.

In other words, close everything down on a last-in-first-out basis.

| improve this answer | |
  • 1
    AKA, also known as a Stack – SnakeDoc May 28 '13 at 20:16
  • 1
    @SnakeDoc AKA also known as also known as. – ddmps May 28 '13 at 20:17
  • 1
    @Pescis I had to meet the minimum char amount ;-P – SnakeDoc May 28 '13 at 20:17
  • While this does answer the question, it does not help the OP become a better programmer nor gain more knowledge. OP, look into A.R.M. / Try-With-Resources Blocks for the proper way to do this in Modern Java (Java 7+). docs.oracle.com/javase/tutorial/essential/exceptions/… – SnakeDoc May 28 '13 at 20:39
4

You should close the resources in the reverse of the order you opened (as if these resources are on a stack).

With Java 7 try-with-resources, the ideal way is:

try (
   Connection conn = somethingThatGetsAConnection();
   Statement st = conn.createStatement();
   Resultset rs = st.executeQuery("SELECT something");
) {
    // Do stuff

} catch (SQLException e) {
    // Do stuff
}

And Java will take care of it for you, and it will close the resource in the reverse order. See also the Oracle tutorial on try-with-resources:

Note that the 'close' methods of resources are called in the opposite order of their creation.

You can find a more in-depth look at try-with-resources in the article Better Resource Management with Java SE 7: Beyond Syntactic Sugar

The Java Language Specification for Java 7 mentions in section 14.20.3:

Resources are initialized in left-to-right order. If a resource fails to initialize (that is, its initializer expression throws an exception), then all resources initialized so far by the try-with-resources statement are closed. If all resources initialize successfully, the try block executes as normal and then all non-null resources of the try-with-resources statement are closed.

Resources are closed in the reverse order from that in which they were initialized. A resource is closed only if it initialized to a non-null value. An exception from the closing of one resource does not prevent the closing of other resources.

This can also be seen as a clear indication that the Java language designers consider closing resources in the reverse order they where allocated the norm.

| improve this answer | |
  • @Aubin you are mistaken. Please remove your -1 from this answer too. ARM blocks order does not matter, the JVM takes care of it. This answers the OP's question better than the OP expected. – SnakeDoc May 28 '13 at 20:35
  • @Aubin Added a short mention of the reverse order, but I think StackOverflow isn't about always answering the exact question, but also about providing a better answer to the actual problem. And try-with-resources solves the question by removing the need to actually think about it. – Mark Rotteveel May 28 '13 at 20:37
  • Ok, NOW that's right, I've removed my downvote. A reference to the JLS will be nice to complete this answer. – Aubin May 28 '13 at 20:39
  • @Aubin updated my answer, although in my reading of the JLS it explicitly mentions an exception in one close, does not prevent another close: "An exception from the closing of one resource does not prevent the closing of other resources." (of course it might mean that the specific resource you try to close hasn't been closed, but that also happens without try-with-resources – Mark Rotteveel May 28 '13 at 20:51
0

ResultSet, Statement and then the Connection. The golden rule to JDBC connections and statements is to close in the reverse order of initiation or opening. In addition, the ResultSet is dependant on the execution of the Statement and the Statement is dependant on the Connection instance. Hence, the closing should occur in that order (ResultSet, Statement, Connection).

| improve this answer | |
0

The first example is the right way. The problem with any other order is that closing a Statement will automatically close any underlying ResultSet as well (and same may happen for a Connection) - so you need to close the one lowest in the hierarchy first.

The close() methods may throw a SQLException, as @aubin pointed out. One easy solution to this problem is to use DBUtils closeQuietly() method for closing them - then you don't even need to null-check!

| improve this answer | |
0

To solve this with minimal effort, try using Java 7's new A.R.M. (Automatic Resource Management) Blocks, also known as Try-With-Resources.

try (Connection conn = null, Statement st = null, ResultSet rs = null){
    // Do stuff

} catch (SQLException e) {
    // Do stuff
}

No ugly Finally or worrying about proper order, Java takes care of it for you.

Some more info regarding ARM/Try-With-Resources Blocks: http://docs.oracle.com/javase/tutorial/essential/exceptions/tryResourceClose.html

| improve this answer | |
  • What about the order of the close operations? It's the question and you don't answer it... – Aubin May 28 '13 at 20:31
  • @Aubin it answers his question better. In ARM blocks Order does not matter, ARM blocks were invented to solve this exact problem. Please remove your -1 – SnakeDoc May 28 '13 at 20:34
  • 1
    @SnakeDoc in ARM the close is called in reverse order of allocation – Mark Rotteveel May 28 '13 at 20:35
  • 1
    @SnakeDoc I am going by that tutorial you also link to which mentions it explicitly (see the quote in my answer). AFAIK the compiler actually transforms a try-with-resources to a finally block with some (complex) exception handling; it is not much more than syntactic sugar. – Mark Rotteveel May 28 '13 at 20:39
  • 1
    See also this link on try-with-resources (especially the demystified section at then end): oracle.com/technetwork/articles/java/… – Mark Rotteveel May 28 '13 at 20:42

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.