5

I am curious to know whether there is a package or method for R to guess gender from first names.

I am thinking of running it on the U.S. Congress as a test.

I need this to work over several European languages.

CRAN does not have such a package.

CRAN has the gender package, but it works only on English names.

Issue solved by the genderizeR package. See links in my self-answer.

closed as off-topic by Rich Scriven, Steven Beaupré, zx8754, Mark Rotteveel, timgeb Jan 5 '16 at 12:16

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6

There is now a package on CRAN for specifically for this: gender

From the description:

Encodes gender based on names and dates of birth, using either the Social Security Administration's data set of first names by year of birth or the Census Bureau data from 1789 to 1940, both from the United States of America. By using these data sets instead of lists of male and female names, this package is able to more accurately guess the gender of a name, and it is able to report the probability that a name was male or female.

It also has a very helpful vignette demonstrating typical uses.

4

I believe the answer is "no," but you could still use R to analyze this. Obviously it would be a probabilistic type of answer since some names are ambiguous or unique. This stackoverflow question has some helpful suggestions but links are out of date. US census data is a good place to start. From the 2000 United States census, you can find name directories and metadata at http://www.census.gov/genealogy/www/data/1990surnames/names_files.html. Some interesting issues are discussed in http://www.census.gov/srd/papers/pdf/rr97-2.pdf and http://www.census.gov/population/www/documentation/twps07/twps07.pdf.

4

Please don't accept this as an answer as it is based on other's answers and links. I have added this function to the qdap package as it fits the package.

library(qdap)

name2sex(qcv(mary, jenn, linda, JAME, GABRIEL, OLIVA, 
    tyler, jamie, JAMES, tyrone, cheryl, drew))

name2sex(qcv(mary, jenn, linda, JAME, GABRIEL, OLIVA, 
    tyler, jamie, JAMES, tyrone, cheryl, drew), FALSE)

name2sex(qcv(mary, jenn, linda, JAME, GABRIEL, OLIVA, 
    tyler, jamie, JAMES, tyrone, cheryl, drew), FALSE, TRUE)

name2sex(qcv(mary, jenn, linda, JAME, GABRIEL, OLIVA, 
    tyler, jamie, JAMES, tyrone, cheryl, drew), TRUE, FALSE)


## > name2sex(qcv(mary, jenn, linda, JAME, GABRIEL, OLIVA, 
## +     tyler, jamie, JAMES, tyrone, cheryl, drew))
##  [1] F F F M M F M F M M F M
## Levels: F M

## > name2sex(qcv(mary, jenn, linda, JAME, GABRIEL, OLIVA, 
## +     tyler, jamie, JAMES, tyrone, cheryl, drew), FALSE)
##  [1] B    <NA> F    B    B    F    B    B    B    M    F    B   
## Levels: B F M

## > name2sex(qcv(mary, jenn, linda, JAME, GABRIEL, OLIVA, 
## +     tyler, jamie, JAMES, tyrone, cheryl, drew), FALSE, TRUE)
##  [1] B F F B B F B B B M F B
## Levels: B F M

## > name2sex(qcv(mary, jenn, linda, JAME, GABRIEL, OLIVA, 
## +     tyler, jamie, JAMES, tyrone, cheryl, drew), TRUE, FALSE)
##  [1] F    <NA> F    M    M    F    M    F    M    M    F    M   
## Levels: F M

Edit- I added a fuzzy.match argument to attempt to guess gender for non recognized names based on fuzzy matching, though this is computationally expensive.

  • I won't accept it as an answer but I have +1'd it. I'm a big fan of your package, it's teaching me lots about topics like sentiment analysis. Thanks for your contribution, much appreciated! – Fr. May 30 '13 at 15:14
2

Depending upon your implementation ideas, the plyr package tutorial has a good data set:

Baby names Top 1000 male and female baby names in the US, from 1880 to 2008. 258,000 records (1000 * 2 * 129) But only four variables: year, name, sex and percent.

  • I don't believe this is in plyr's data sets. – Tyler Rinker May 29 '13 at 16:33
  • Fair point - it's in the tutorial, not the official package. This is downloadable via the link above. – Jack Ryan May 29 '13 at 16:40
  • Totally missed that. Thanks. – Tyler Rinker May 29 '13 at 16:42
2

Following this discussion on Finnish names, I came across the fantastic genderizeR package, which looks into an online database to determine gender from names in several languages.

Solved!

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