If I use fopen() call to open a same file in multi-thread, and write data to the file. Should I use a mutex to ensure the data won't be disordered?

  • 2
    The issue isn't with fopen(), but how you write to the file. You need to do something (a mutex is one example) to keep the writes under control. – Randy Howard May 29 '13 at 6:34
  • "Record lock" is also an option. It enables you to lock different range of the file. Different threads can write different parts of the file at the same time. – X Zhang May 29 '13 at 7:14
up vote 14 down vote accepted

If two threads both open the same file with fopen(), they will each have independent file streams (FILE *) backed by independent file descriptors referring to the same file. You can write independently to the two file streams, but the net result on the file will depend on where the threads write and when they flush the file stream. The results are unpredictable unless you control where each thread is writing. The simplest thing is to make sure both threads use the same file stream, but you probably still need to coordinate between the threads. Note that POSIX requires the C functions to give coordinated access to the file stream — see flockfile() which imposes the requirement that

All functions that reference (FILE *) objects, except those with names ending in _unlocked, shall behave as if they use flockfile() and funlockfile() internally to obtain ownership of these (FILE *) objects.

If you open the file in append mode in both threads, then the writes would be safely at the end of the file each time, but you still have to worry about flushing the data before the buffer fills.

  • I'm not sure I understood, if I access (read/write) differen files at the same time, should I expect any problem? – ransh May 26 '15 at 13:47
  • @ransh: If two file streams are opened on different files, there will be no problem. If they're opened on the same file, there will be problems. – Jonathan Leffler May 26 '15 at 14:11
  • thanks for the clarification. – ransh May 26 '15 at 14:47

As far as I know you should use mutexes.

I hadn't try this is C, but in Java if you open a file in more than one thread, both threads can write in it and file is really messed up.

So I think the situation in C will be equivalent to Java.

  • 8
    speculations are not good answers – stdcall May 29 '13 at 6:39
  • Actually I'm saying that you should try it. Run two threads and you will see how messed up the files will be. What am I speculating ? – Kamen Stoykov May 29 '13 at 6:43
  • 3
    "So I think the situation in C will be equivalent to Java." - this can easily be written as a comment, not an answer. – stdcall May 29 '13 at 8:56

fopen() is reenterable, and you can have as many descriptors pointing to the same file as you like.

What you get as a result of reading/writing from/to the file using multiple descriptors is not a thread safety question, but rather concurrent file access, which in most cases (apart from when the file is read-only) won't work well.

Below is a thread safe open file write you can open multiple files and it just write to the file sequentially. I think the below code can be still optimized with time sync and popping out unused files to maintain cache

Any suggestion is welcome

class OpenFile
{
    string fileName;
    static map<string, unique_ptr<mutex>> fmap;
    bool flag;
public :
    OpenFile(string file) : fileName(file) {
        try {
            if(checkFile(file))
            {
                flag = false;
                fmap.emplace(file, make_unique<mutex>());
            }
            else
            {
                flag = true;
            }
        }
        catch(string str)
        {
            cout << str << endl;
        }
    }
    void writeToFile(const string& str) const
    {
        if (flag)
        {
            lock_guard<mutex> lck(*fmap.find(fileName)->second);
            ofstream ofile(fileName, ios::app);
            ofile << "Writing to the file " << str << endl;
            ofile.close();
        }
        else
        {
            ofstream ofile(fileName, ios::app);
            ofile << "Writing to the file " << str << endl;
            ofile.close();
        }
    }
    string ReadFile() const
    {
        string line;
        if (flag)
        {
            lock_guard<mutex> lck(*fmap.find(fileName)->second);
            ifstream ifile(fileName, ios::in);
            getline(ifile, line);
            ifile.close();
        }
        else
        {
            ifstream ifile(fileName, ios::in);
            getline(ifile, line);
            ifile.close();
        }
        return line;
    }
    OpenFile() = delete;
    OpenFile& operator=(const OpenFile& o) = delete;
    static bool checkFile(string& fname);
};


bool OpenFile::checkFile(string& fname)
{
    if (fmap.find(fname)==fmap.end())
    {
        return true;
    }
    else
        return false;
}

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