191

Scenario: Consider the following is the part of code from a node web app.

app.get('/users/:id?', function(req, res, next){
    var id = req.params.id;
    if (id) {
        // do something
    } else {
        next(); //or return next();
    }
});

Issue: I am checking which one to go with just next() or return next(). Above sample code works exactly the same for both & did not show any difference in execution.

Question: Can some one put light on this, when to use next() and when to use return next() and some important difference?

6 Answers 6

351

As @Laurent Perrin's answer:

If you don't do it, you risk triggering the callback a second time later, which usually has devastating results

I give an example here if you write middleware like this:

app.use((req, res, next) => {
  console.log('This is a middleware')
  next()
  console.log('This is first-half middleware')
})

app.use((req, res, next) => {
  console.log('This is second middleware')
  next()
})

app.use((req, res, next) => {
  console.log('This is third middleware')
  next()
})

You will find out that the output in console is:

This is a middleware
This is second middleware
This is third middleware
This is first-half middleware

That is, it runs the code below next() after all middleware function finished.

However, if you use return next(), it will jump out the callback immediately and the code below return next() in the callback will be unreachable.

5
  • 72
    As a beginner to express this answer made things clearer to me than the other answers. Thumbs up!
    – mandarin
    Commented Dec 19, 2017 at 13:44
  • 2
    Would a similar thing be true of res.redirect('/') vs. return res.redirect('/') in this type of situation? Maybe it's just better to always write return in front of res statements to avoid errors of setting headers after they were sent?
    – Adam D
    Commented Sep 7, 2018 at 6:45
  • 2
    Why should I write code after next()? Isn't it obvious that I do nothing after I finished my task in a middleware? @PJCHENder Commented Jul 25, 2019 at 6:17
  • 1
    @ImranPollob sometimes mistakes happens. When you write a lot of code, ifs/elses/etc. You may forget ```return next()` Commented Jul 25, 2019 at 16:45
  • 1
    @ImranPollob - There could very well be times where you want your code to unwrap (so to speak), and come back to a middleware that was executed earlier. The fact that it will only actually unwrap and reach code positioned after next(), if no other middleware's have returned yet, could be exactly what you're looking to do. Special types of logging, caching, or analytics spring to mind as potential use cases, although this should really be used sparingly, as it would quickly become confusing if you're using this technique all over the place.
    – Jack_Hu
    Commented May 4, 2022 at 23:27
205

Some people always write return next() is to ensure that the execution stops after triggering the callback.

If you don't do it, you risk triggering the callback a second time later, which usually has devastating results. Your code is fine as it is, but I would rewrite it as:

app.get('/users/:id?', function(req, res, next){
    var id = req.params.id;

    if(!id)
        return next();

    // do something
});

It saves me an indentation level, and when I read the code again later, I'm sure there is no way next is called twice.

3
  • 3
    Would a similar thing be true of res.redirect('/') vs. return res.redirect('/') in this type of situation? Maybe it's just better to always write return in front of res statements to avoid errors of setting headers after they were sent?
    – Adam D
    Commented Sep 7, 2018 at 6:46
  • @AdamD I would like to know that as well. Commented Sep 1, 2020 at 23:01
  • @theprogrammer Yes, I think this answer applies the same way to things like res.redirect and it would be best practice to use it, unless you have some other server tasks you want to do after redirecting the user.
    – Adam D
    Commented Sep 4, 2020 at 1:47
54

next() is part of connect middleware. Callbacks for router flow doesn't care if you return anything from your functions, so return next() and next(); return; is basically the same.

In case you want to stop the flow of functions you can use next(err) like the following

app.get('/user/:id?', 
    function(req, res, next) { 
        console.log('function one');
        if ( !req.params.id ) 
            next('No ID'); // This will return error
        else   
            next(); // This will continue to function 2
    },
    function(req, res) { 
        console.log('function two'); 
    }
);

Pretty much next() is used for extending the middleware of your requests.

7
  • 1
    Can we send parameter like: next('No ID') ? Commented May 29, 2013 at 12:10
  • 9
    next('No ID') is actually sending an error, which will break the flow. Commented May 29, 2013 at 12:15
  • Use next(null, "somevalue"); For tools like async.waterfall it will pass the value to the next function. For complex series of interactions that are data driven, I usually pass a context object between functions. That way I can create generic functions that can be shared across multiple end points and control flow via data in the context Commented Oct 30, 2015 at 0:12
  • 7
    "so return next() and next(); return; is basically the same." - just what I needed to read. thx @drinchev Commented Feb 25, 2016 at 1:25
  • 2
    I observe the opposite (when firing error): next(error) triggers next middleware, but continues to execute code; return next(error) just relegates execution to the next middleware. next(e) and return next(e) are NOT the same. Commented Jul 25, 2018 at 17:06
4

The difference between next() and return next() is very simple as another programming principle. Some lines of code are explain below:

    app.use((req, res, next) => {
       console.log('Calling first middleware');
       next();
       console.log('Calling after the next() function');
    });


    app.use((req, res, next) => {
       console.log('Calling second middleware');
       return next(); // It returns the function block immediately and call next() function so the return next(); and next(); return; are the same
       console.log('After calling return next()');
    });

Output is

Calling first middleware
Calling after the next() function
Calling second middleware

1
  • Are you sure your output is correct? Doesn't Calling after the next() function come after Calling second middleware?
    – cbreezier
    Commented Mar 19 at 23:45
4
import express from "express"
  
const app = express()
// API for the testing of next() 
app.get(
  '/next', function (req,res,next) { 
    console.log('hi there ');
    next();
    console.log('you are still here');
  }
)
  
// API for the testing of return next() 
app.get(
  '/return-next', function (req,res,next) { 
    console.log('hi there');
    return next(); 
    console.log('you are still here');
  }
)
  
app.listen(5000,()=> {
  console.log("App is running on port 5000")
})

next() in /**next** route will call the middlewares and after the middlewares are executed it comes back to where it is called (same like a function call) and executes the rest of the codes

output:

hi there

you are still here

In /**return-next** route there is a return in front of next() which returns the controller

output:

hi there 

if you consider next() like a function call you could understand it properly

0

Rony's example is quite good. However, I believe that the output is:

Calling first middleware
Calling second middleware
Calling after the next() function

1
  • Your answer could be improved by providing an example of the solution and how it helps the OP.
    – Tyler2P
    Commented Jul 26, 2023 at 9:40

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