18

I'm trying to write a bash script, which will do the following:

  1. reads the content from the first file (as a first argument)
  2. reads the content from the second file (as a second argument)
  3. finds the line in the second file with the given pattern (as a third argument)
  4. inserts text from the first file to the second file after the line of the pattern.
  5. prints final file on the screen.

For example:

first_file.txt:

111111
1111
11
1

second_file.txt:

122221
2222
22
2

pattern:

2222

output:

122221
111111
1111
11
1
2222
111111
1111
11
1
22
2

What should I use to realize this functionality on BASH?

I wrote the code, but it doesn't work properly (why?):

    #!/bin/bash

    first_filename="$1"
    second_filename="$2"
    pattern="$3"

    while read -r line
    do
    if [[ $line=˜$pattern ]]; then
            while read -r line2
            do
                    echo $line2
            done < $second_filename
    fi
    echo $line
    done < $first_filename
4
  • For the 4th point, sed -i 'line, text...' can make it
    – fedorqui
    May 29, 2013 at 10:16
  • 1
    could you give a small example? (input and expected output)
    – michas
    May 29, 2013 at 10:20
  • What happens in your current code? "Doesn't work" is not a very good error description May 29, 2013 at 10:32
  • @Emil Vikstrom: My code just output first_filename's content in each line of the second_filename. It's incorrect. May 29, 2013 at 10:34

5 Answers 5

49

sed can do that without loops. Use its r command:

sed -e '/pattern/rFILE1' FILE2

Test session:

$ cd -- "$(mktemp -d)" 
$ printf '%s\n' 'nuts' 'bolts' > first_file.txt
$ printf '%s\n' 'foo' 'bar' 'baz' > second_file.txt
$ sed -e '/bar/r./first_file.txt' second_file.txt
foo
bar
nuts
bolts
baz
7
  • 6
    +1 Never heard of the r command. Added a test session to verify.
    – l0b0
    May 29, 2013 at 11:15
  • 1
    Is there some way to ensure it's only inserted once?
    – l0b0
    May 29, 2013 at 11:21
  • @l0b0 sed -e '1,/pattern/rFILE1' FILE2 will insert it only once but there is an edge case where pattern occurs on the first line. In that case use GNU sed: sed '0,/pattern/rFILE1' FILE2
    – potong
    May 29, 2013 at 11:33
  • 1
    @l0b0 @potong: Or, use branching: sed -e '/pattern/{ r FILE1' -e 'b R' -e '}' -e 'b' -e ':R {n ; b R' -e '}' FILE2
    – choroba
    May 29, 2013 at 11:38
  • 1
    For the "do it just once" request, sometimes ed, while more verbose, is clearer than sed: printf "%s\n" '/2222/r first_file.txt' '1,$p' q | ed second_file.txt 2>/dev/null -- to edit in-place, replace '1,$p' with 'w' May 29, 2013 at 12:50
11

Using awk works as well.

To insert before the ###marker### line :

// for each <line> of second_file.txt :
//   if <line> matches regexp ###marker###, outputs first_file.txt.
//   **without any condition :** print <line>
awk '/###marker###/ { system ( "cat first_file.txt" ) } \
     { print; } \' second_file.txt

To insert after the ###marker###line :

// for each <line> of second_file.txt :
//   **without any condition :** print <line>
//   if <line> matches regexp ###marker###, outputs first_file.txt.
awk '{ print; } \
     /###marker###/ { system ( "cat first_file.txt" ) } \' second_file.txt

To replace the ###marker### line :

// for each <line> of second_file.txt :
//   if <line> matches regexp ###marker###, outputs first_file.txt.
//   **else**, print <line>
awk '/###marker###/ { system ( "cat first_file.txt" ) } \
     !/###marker###/ { print; }' second_file.txt

If you want to do in-place replacement, use a temp file for being sure the pipe doesn't start before awk has read the entire file; add :

> second_file.txt.new
mv second_file.txt{.new,}
// (like "mv second_file.txt.new second_file.txt", but shorter to type !)

If you want replacement inside of the line, (replacing just the pattern and keeping the rest of the line), a similar solution should be achievable with sed instead of awk.

2
  • 1
    this works a treat when your variable has any quotes in it, sed can't really deal with that
    – stringy05
    Dec 3, 2014 at 9:38
  • My awk solution (replacing marker): awk -v f="$file" '/###marker###/ {system("cat " f); next}; 1' -- where $file, the file to insert, must not have spaces in it's name :/
    – schoettl
    Jan 27, 2017 at 23:05
4

I use sed like this and it worked as a charm

sed -i -e '/pattern/r filetoinsert' filetobeinserted

What it does is insert the 'filetoinsert' into 'filetobeinserted' after the line with the specified pattern

Take care to choose a unique pattern, not sure how it will work with a duplicate patterns, I assume it will do it just of the first one

2

You need spaces around the =~ operator. Compare:

[[ foo=~bar ]]
[[ foo =~ bar ]]

This is because the first expression essentially evaluates as "Is this string empty?"

Also, the OP code uses small tilde rather than tilde.

Even so, you can easily get rid of the inner loop. Just replace the whole while read -r line2 bit with cat -- "$second_filename".

Your last echo $line is only correct if the file does not end in a newline character (standard with *nix tools). Instead, you should use while read -r line || [[ $line ~= '' ]]. This works with or without newline at the end.

Also, Use More Quotes™.

4
  • ./replace_shell.sh: line 9: conditional binary operator expected ./replace_shell.sh: line 9: syntax error near =˜' ./replace_shell.sh: line 9: if [[ $line =˜ $pattern ]]; then' May 29, 2013 at 10:57
  • And when I tried to do: "cat -- "$second_filename": I've got an error: sed: 1: "file2.txt": invalid command code f May 29, 2013 at 11:05
  • @user2431907 is not the same as =~. ˜ is Unicode Small Tilde.
    – l0b0
    May 29, 2013 at 11:07
  • @user2431907 sed? There's no sed command in your original code. You'd better post the actual code if you want help with it.
    – l0b0
    May 29, 2013 at 11:10
1

This should work:

perl -lne 'BEGIN{open(A,"first_file.txt");@f=<A>;}print;if(/2222/){print @f}' second_file.txt

Tested:

> cat temp
111111
1111
11
1
> cat temp2
122221
2222
22
2
> perl -lne 'BEGIN{open(A,"temp");@f=<A>;}print;if(/2222/){print @f}' temp2
122221
111111
1111
11
1

2222
111111
1111
11
1

22
2
> 
0

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