1

Lets say i have 2 tables Master and slave . Master table contains master_name and master_id , Slave table has Slave_id, slave_name and master_id.

sample data.

master_id Master_name  Master_status      slave_id  slave_name  master_id status
1         x               online              1          a          1       online
2         y               online              2          b          1       online
3         z               offline             3          c          2       offline
                                              4          d          3       offline
                                              5          e          3       online

the expected result i m trying to obtain is,

master_id  no_of_slave
   1             2
   2             0

i want to get the no: of online slaves each online masters have.

sorry for the late edit.

  • Which RDBMS? What are your thoughts on the problem at hand? – hd1 May 29 '13 at 11:24
5

Use LEFT JOIN like this one:

SELECT m.master_id
     , count(s.slave_id) AS no_of_slave
FROM master m 
LEFT JOIN slave s 
     ON m.master_id = s.master_id
GROUP BY m.master_id;

Result:

╔═══════════╦═════════════╗
║ MASTER_ID ║ NO_OF_SLAVE ║
╠═══════════╬═════════════╣
║         1 ║           2 ║
║         2 ║           1 ║
║         3 ║           2 ║
╚═══════════╩═════════════╝

See this SQLFiddle

| improve this answer | |
  • 3
    I might suggest a LEFT JOIN to return masters without slaves. – Taryn May 29 '13 at 11:28
  • @bluefeet - Yeah better. Updated. – Himanshu Jansari May 29 '13 at 11:30
1

Use the below query:

Select m.master_id, count(s.master_id) as no_of_slave 
       FROM master m 
            JOIN slave s 
            ON m.master_id = s.master_id
            GROUP By m.master_id;
| improve this answer | |
0
select    master_id, count(1)
from      Slave
group by  master_id
order by  master_id

will just give you masters that have slaves, and you don't even need to join with master if tables are big

| improve this answer | |
0
select 
    a.master_id,
    count(b.slave_id) 
from 
    master a,
    slave b 
where 
     a.master_id=b.master_id 
group by 
     a.master_id
| improve this answer | |
  • 4
    Why are you using commas to join the tables? Why not ANSI standard syntax with a JOIN? – Taryn May 29 '13 at 11:27
  • imo the commas are easier to read for small joins and they work pretty much everywhere as a synonym to joins. – Markus Mikkolainen May 29 '13 at 11:29
  • 2
    Please read bad habits to kick using old style join syntax. – Taryn May 29 '13 at 11:31
  • yes, but for_small_joins , for multiple joins or complex joins I always use the proper join syntax. – Markus Mikkolainen May 29 '13 at 11:32
  • If you always use proper joins on multiple joins, why not use it all the time? – Taryn May 29 '13 at 11:33
0

You're not interested in master names so a join is not required, you have all necessary info in the Slave table:

select master_id, count(slave_id) as no_of_slave
from Slave
group by master_id
order by master_id --remove this line, if ordering of master ids is not important
;

If a given master id is not in this result, this means it has no slaves.

| improve this answer | |
0

You can use this. This will work.

select m.master_id,(select count(*) from slave s where s.master_id = m.master_id) as no_of_slave from master m
| improve this answer | |
0
  SELECT master_id, count(*) AS no_of_slave
    FROM slave
GROUP BY master_id
ORDER BY master_id;
| improve this answer | |

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