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I've been reading ELF standard here. From what I understand, each ELF contains ELF header, program headers (why more than one?) and section headers. Can anyone please explain:

  1. How are ELF files generated? is it the compiler responsibility?
  2. What are sections and why do we need them?
  3. What are program headers and why do we need them?
  4. Inside program headers, what's the meaning of the fields p_vaddr and p_paddr?
  5. Does each section have it's own section header?

Alternatively, does any one have a link to a more friendly documenation of ELF?

4 Answers 4

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  1. How are ELF files generated? is it the compiler responsibility?

    They can be generated by a compiler, an assembler, or any other tool that can generate them. Even your own program you wrote for generating ELF files ;) They're just streams of bytes after all, so they can be generated by just writing bytes into a file in binary mode. You can do that too.

  2. What are sections and why do we need them?

    ELF files are subdivided into sections. Sections are the smallest continuous regions in the file. You can think of them as pages in an organizer, each with its own name and type that describes what does it contain inside. Linkers use this information to combine different parts of the program coming from different modules into one executable file or a library, by merging sections of the same type (gluing pages together, if you will).

    In executable files, sections are optional, but they're usually there to describe what's in the file and where does it begin, and how much bytes does it take.

  3. What are program headers and why do we need them?

    They're mostly for making executable files. In order to run a program, sections aren't enough, because you have to specify not only what's there in the file, but also where should it be loaded into memory in the running process. Program headers are just for that purpose: they describe segments, which are regions of memory in the running process, with different access privileges & stuff.

    Each program header describes one segment. It tells the loader where should it load a certain region in the file into memory and what permissions should it set for that region (e.g. should it be allowed to execute code from it? should it be writable or just for reading?)

    Segments can be further subdivided into sections. For example, if you have to specify that your code segment is further subdivided into code and static read-only strings for the messages the program displays. Or that your data segment is subdivided into funky data and hardcore data :J It's for you to decide.

    In executable files, sections are optional, but it's nice to have them, because they describe what's in the file and allow for dumping selected parts of it (e.g. with the objdump tool). Sometimes they are needed, though, for storing dynamic linking information, symbol tables, debugging information, stuff like that.

  4. Inside program headers, what's the meaning of the fields p_vaddr and p_paddr?

    Those are the addresses at which the data in the file will be loaded. They map the contents of the file into their corresponding memory locations. The first one is a virtual address, the second one is physical address.

    Physical addresses are the "raw" memory addresses. On modern operating systems, those are no longer used in the userland. Instead, userland programs use virtual addresses. The operating system deceives the userland program that it is alone in memory, and that the entire address space is available for it. Under the hood, the operating system maps those virtual addresses to physical ones in the actual memory, and it does it transparently to the program.

    Of course, not every address in the virtual address space is available at the same time. There are limitations imposed by the actual physical memory available. So the operating system just maps the memory for the segments the program actually uses (here's where the "segments" part from the ELF file's program headers comes into play). If the process tries to access some unmapped memory, the operating system steps in and says, "sorry, chap, this memory doesn't belong to you". (The program can address it, but it cannot access it.)

  5. Does each section have it's own section header?

    Yes. If it doesn't have an entry in the Section Headers Table, it's not a section :q Because they only way to tell if some part of the file is a section, is by looking in to the Section Headers Table which tells you what sections are defined in the file and where you can find them.

    You can think of the Section Headers Table as a table of contents in a book. Without the table of contents, there aren't any chapters after all, because they're not listed anywhere. The book may have headings, but the content is not subdivided into logical chapters that can be found through the table of contents. Same goes with sections in ELF files: there can be some regions of data, but you can't tell without the "table of contents" which is the SHT.

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This link includes a better explaination.

  1. How are ELF files generated? is it the compiler responsibility?*

    It is architecture dependent.

  2. What are sections and why do we need them?

    Different section have different information such as code, initialized data, uninitialized data etc. These information will be used by the compiler and linker.

  3. What are program headers and why do we need them?

    Program headers are used by the operating system when it loads the executable. These headers contains information about the segments (contiguous memory block with some permissions) such as which parts needs to be loaded, interpreter infor etc.

  4. Inside program headers, what's the meaning of the fields p_vaddr and p_paddr?

    In general virtual address and the physical address are same. But could be different depends on the system.

  5. Does each section have it's own section header?

    yes. Each section have a section header entry at section header table.

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This is the best documentation I've found: http://www.skyfree.org/linux/references/ELF_Format.pdf

  1. Each section has only one section header, but there can be section headers without sections
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2 - There are many different sections, ex: relocation section recoeds many infomation for relocation symbol. I use the infomation to load a elf object and run/relocate the object. Antoher example: debug section records debug information, gdb use the data for showing debug message. Symbol section records symbol information.

3 - programming header used by loader, loader loads a elf execute file by looking up programming header.

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