52

What's the Java equivalent of C#'s:

enum Foo
{
  Bar = 0,
  Baz = 1,
  Fii = 10,
}
1
  • 13
    I am actually embarrassed for Java that enums with different int values doesn't just work.
    – Rhyous
    Commented May 27, 2012 at 20:27

5 Answers 5

81

If you want attributes for your enum you need to define it like this:

public enum Foo {
    BAR (0),
    BAZ (1),
    FII (10);

    private final int index;   

    Foo(int index) {
        this.index = index;
    }

    public int index() { 
        return index; 
    }

}

You'd use it like this:

public static void main(String[] args) {
    for (Foo f : Foo.values()) {
       System.out.printf("%s has index %d%n", f, f.index());
    }
}

The thing to realise is that enum is just a shortcut for creating a class, so you can add whatever attributes and methods you want to the class.

If you don't want to define any methods on your enum you could change the scope of the member variables and make them public, but that's not what they do in the example on the Sun website.

4
  • 2
    +1 for including the accessor :) Note that to get to the numerical value, you'd have to use Foo.BAR.index()
    – Matt H
    Commented Nov 5, 2009 at 17:01
  • Note also, that if you want to get to the enum from the int code, you shoudl also add a static method that do the reverse mapping (with a switch or a map).
    – penpen
    Commented Nov 5, 2009 at 17:47
  • @penpen - a switch is a bummer to maintain; do the map, or just do a linear search, it's not that bad (except when it is) Commented Nov 6, 2009 at 0:23
  • I would not call this index but val instead as for example the index (ordinal) of FII in this code is 2 (assuming zero based indexing) while its value is 10.
    – epeleg
    Commented Dec 4, 2012 at 10:16
15

If you have a contiguous range of values, and all you need is the integer value, you can just declare the enum minimally:

public enum NUMBERZ {
        ZERO, ONE, TWO
}

and then obtain the int value as follows:

int numberOne = NUMBERZ.ONE.ordinal();

However, if you need a discontiguous range (as in your example, where you jump from 1 to 10) then you will need to write your own enum constructor which sets your own member variable, and provide a get method for that variable, as described in the other answers here.

4

It is:

enum Foo
{
  Bar(0),
  Baz(1),
  Fii(10);

  private int index;

  private Foo(int index) {
      this.index = index;
  }
}

Note that to get the value of the enum from the index, Foo.valueOf(1) (*), would not work. You need do code it yourself:

public Foo getFooFromIndex(int index) {
    switch (index) {
    case 0:
        return Foo.Bar;
    case 1:
        return Foo.Baz;
    case 10:
        return Foo.Fii;

    default:
        throw new RuntimeException("Unknown index:" + index);
    }
}

(*): Enum.valueOf() return the enum from a String. As such, you can get the value Bar with Foo.valueOf('Bar')

2
  • 3
    Instead of that hand-coded method, lazily initialize a Map<Foo,Integer>. (for example using Maps.uniqueIndex() from Google Collections.) Commented Nov 5, 2009 at 17:48
  • Too bad it's not possible to use Bar.index, Baz.index etc in the switch because they aren't constant expressions.
    – Robert
    Commented Mar 22, 2012 at 20:17
2

Sounds like you want something like this:

public enum Foo {
    Bar(0),
    Baz(1),
    Fii(10);

    private int number;

    public Foo(int number) {
       this.number = number;
    }

    public int getNumber() {
        return number;
    }
}

For starters, Sun's Java Enum Tutorial would be a great place to learn more.

1
  • 2
    Keep in mind, that the constructor for an enum type must be package-private or private access, not public.
    – Soundlink
    Commented Jan 4, 2011 at 22:05
0
public enum Foo {
    Bar(0),
    Baz(1),
    Fii(10);

    private final int someint;
    Foo(int someint) {
        this.someint = someint;
    }
}

In Java enums are very similar to other classes but the the Java compiler knows to treat a little differently in various situations. So if you want data in them like you seem to you need to have an instance variable for the data and an appropriate constructor.

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service and acknowledge you have read our privacy policy.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.