16

I want to create a fixed size array with a default number of elements already filled from another array, so lets say that I have this method:

def fixed_array(size, other)
  array = Array.new(size)
  other.each_with_index { |x, i| array[i] = x }
  array
end

So then I can use the method like:

fixed_array(5, [1, 2, 3])

And I will get

[1, 2, 3, nil, nil]

Is there an easier way to do that in ruby? Like expanding the current size of the array I already have with nil objects?

  • 1
    Do you want a new array, or expand an existing array? Which? – sawa May 30 '13 at 8:15
31
def fixed_array(size, other)  
   Array.new(size) { |i| other[i] }
end
fixed_array(5, [1, 2, 3])
# => [1, 2, 3, nil, nil]
  • Is this possible only for particular index ? – t s Sep 13 '18 at 11:49
11
5.times.collect{|i| other[i]}
 => [1, 2, 3, nil, nil] 
5

Is there an easier way to do that in ruby? Like expanding the current size of the array I already have with nil objects?

Yes, you can expand your current array by setting the last element via Array#[]=:

a = [1, 2, 3]
a[4] = nil # index is zero based
a
# => [1, 2, 3, nil, nil]

A method could look like this:

def grow(ary, size)
  ary[size-1] = nil if ary.size < size
  ary
end

Note that this will modify the passed array.

3
a = [1, 2, 3]
b = a.dup
Array.new(5){b.shift} # => [1, 2, 3, nil, nil]

Or

a = [1, 2, 3]
b = Array.new(5)
b[0...a.length] = a
b # => [1, 2, 3, nil, nil]

Or

Array.new(5).zip([1, 2, 3]).map(&:last) # => [1, 2, 3, nil, nil]

Or

Array.new(5).zip([1, 2, 3]).transpose.last # => [1, 2, 3, nil, nil]
2

You can also do the following: (assuming other = [1,2,3])

(other+[nil]*5).first(5)
=> [1, 2, 3, nil, nil]

if other is [], you get

(other+[nil]*5).first(5)
=> [nil, nil, nil, nil]
2

Similar to the answer by @xaxxon, but even shorter:

5.times.map {|x| other[x]}

or

(0..4).map {|x| other[x]}
1

this answer uses the fill method

def fixed_array(size, other, default_element=nil)
  _other = other
  _other.fill(default_element, other.size..size-1)
end

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.