7

is it possible to do something like the following:

I want to catch a custom exception and do something with it - easy: try {...} catch (CustomException) {...}

But then i want to run the code used in the "catch all" block still run some other code which is relevant to all catch blocks...

try
{
    throw new CustomException("An exception.");
}
catch (CustomException ex)
{
    // this runs for my custom exception

throw;
}
catch
{
    // This runs for all exceptions - including those caught by the CustomException catch
}

or do i have to put whatever i want to do in all exception cases (finally is not an option because i want it only to run for the exceptions) into a separate method/nest the whole try/catch in another (euch)...?

2
  • 3
    Setting a flag in the catch statements and using a 'finally' would work for you. Alternatively factor out all the common code into a CleanUpAfterException method and call it at the end of each catch statement. – Chris Pfohl May 30 '13 at 15:29
  • Ah - setting a flag and 'finally' seems like a sort of neat solution. I hadn't thought of that. – JaySeeAre May 30 '13 at 15:59
7

I generally do something along the lines of

try
{ 
    throw new CustomException("An exception.");
}
catch (Exception ex)
{
   if (ex is CustomException)
   {
        // Do whatever
   }
   // Do whatever else
}
1
  • I guess this is the neatest... at least the try block isn't indented also. As it happens i have only one method call to do in both cases, so a separate method wouldn't gain anything. – JaySeeAre May 30 '13 at 16:08
4

You need to use two try blocks:

try
{
    try
    {
        throw new ArgumentException();
    }
    catch (ArgumentException ex)
    {
        Console.WriteLine("This is a custom exception");
        throw;
    }
}
catch (Exception e)
{
    Console.WriteLine("This is for all exceptions, "+
        "including those caught and re-thrown above");
}
1
  • 1
    I thought about this, seems a bit messy though - lots of nesting! – JaySeeAre May 30 '13 at 15:58
2

Just do the overall catch and check to see if the exception is that type:

try
{
   throw new CustomException("An exception.");
}
catch (Exception ex)
{
   if (ex is CustomException)
   {
       // Custom handling
   }
   // Overall handling
}

Alternately, have a method for overall exception handling that both call:

try
{
   throw new CustomException("An exception.");
}
catch (CustomException ex)
{
    // Custom handling here

    HandleGeneralException(ex);
}
catch (Exception ex)
{
   HandleGeneralException(ex);
}
0

No, it doesn't do this way, you either catch a specific exception (linearly) or a generalisation. If you wish to run something for all exceptions you would need to keep a record of whether or not an exception has been thrown, perhaps what it was etc, and use finally, or another contrived, probably more 'messy' and verbose, mechanism.

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