62

I have a static library file called libunp.a, I do know I could use gcc -lunp xx to link to the library.

I could use #pragma comment(lib,"xxx.lib") to tell the Microsoft C/C++ compiler to include the library; how could I do it under Linux/GCC?

1
0

Simple; you can't. GCC has no such equivalent. Specify -l as a gcc parameter, create a linker script, call ld, call 911 or whatever.

Not that such a pragma even makes sense. Libraries should be specified during the linking step. Such information simply doesn't belong inside a translation unit. A translation unit can be preprocessed, compiled and assembled even without a linking stage. The toolchain used by Visual Studio allows this because it is braindead and always performs linking.

You might want to save yourself some tedious typing and create a MakeFile for your project: GNU Make Manual

10
  • 92
    During recent decades it has become popular for programmers to design .h files and .lib files to have some kind of relationship with each other. In such a case it DOES make sense for an .h file to contain a pragma telling the linker to link the corresponding .lib file. Sure gcc doesn't have it, but that doesn't mean it doesn't make sense. – Windows programmer Nov 6 '09 at 3:42
  • 42
    @Mads: The fact that Unix is a fractured platform that requires separation of build and link phases, and all the pain that goes with it, is hardly a justification for trashing the way Windows does it, which is much easier to deal with and allows library implementors to take that pain away from their users. The idea that the Unix approach is harder but better is pure irrational masochism. – Marcelo Cantos Oct 3 '10 at 23:27
  • 30
    @Mads "The toolchain used by Visual Studio allows this because it is braindead and always performs linking." That is just plain misinformation. All the C++ compilers and tools I've used on the windows platform permit preprocessing, compiling, assembling, and linking to be controllable via a switch or option. This includes the msc compiler that comes with Visual Studio. "You might want to save yourself some tedious typing and create a MakeFile for your project". Creating a makefile typcially involves a lot more typing then merely just sticking a #pragma lib "mylib" in the source file. – greatwolf Dec 22 '10 at 9:01
  • 21
    One advantage of the #pragma is that you can do conditional linking without needing complex build scripts. If you have an opengl and dx3d implementation in different headers you can have them automatically include the correct libs. Especially useful if one set of libs doesn't exist on one architecture. It's also useful if the name of the lib file changes with different versions of the library - eg opencv – Martin Beckett Feb 15 '11 at 21:32
  • 9
    Also, fyi, you can compile source with that pragma without linking, if you read the ms spec, it says that it gets put into the object file as a comment for the linker. – chacham15 Mar 24 '11 at 11:23
26

There doesn't seem to be any mention of any equivalent pragmas in the GCC manual's page on pragmas.

One reason I saw for GCC not supporting linking in source code was that sometimes, correct linking depends on link order; and this would require you to make sure that the linking order happens correctly no matter the order of compilation. If you're going to go to that much work, you may as well just pass the linker arguments on the command line (or otherwise), I suppose.

3
  • 2
    Same applies for some, if not all Windows compilers. But yes, such pragmas are bad – Mads Elvheim Nov 6 '09 at 3:37
  • 7
    "correct compilation depends on link order." -- No, as the linked article states, correct LINKING depends on link order. – Windows programmer Nov 6 '09 at 3:39
  • Depending on the order is sometimes a good thing for the linking, but it should not disallow specifying something actually not depending on any specific linking order (except the order to the system libraries which always come later). In particular, it is just stupid to rule out the cases with only one external library for this reason. It is generally unsound for C/C++ folks as it is like to say, "hey, we don't like undefined/unspecified behavior, so let's make all of them well-defined!" – FrankHB Nov 24 '20 at 19:48
21

Libraries should be specified during the linking step. Such information simply doesn't belong inside a translation unit. A translation unit can be preprocessed, compiled and assembled even without a linking stage.

Simply because #pragma comment(lib,"xxx.lib") is in the source file does not mean the compiler consumes it. In fact, it goes in as a comment and is subsequently used by the linker. Not much different than *nix.

2
  • 2
    You are not entirely right, there are some cases like using ROOT (root.cern.ch) where this could be very helpful. – RSFalcon7 Mar 21 '13 at 1:53
  • OP clearly figured that much already, the GCC linker doesn't understand that pragma. This in no way answers the question. – rustyx Jun 10 '20 at 9:42
0

Use this GCC flag to generate an error for unknown pragmas. It will quickly tell you if the compiler understands it.

-Werror=unknown-pragmas

2
  • 3
    This answer does not answer the question. – user202729 Dec 5 '18 at 11:16
  • 1
    ...and no, GCC 9.2 or clang 8 still do not understand this pragma (e.g. warning: ignoring #pragma comment [-Wunknown-pragmas] \\ #pragma comment(lib,"xxx.lib")) – alfC Oct 24 '19 at 6:50

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.