231

JavaScript converts a large INT to scientific notation when the number becomes large. How can I prevent this from happening?

7
  • 5
    Do you want 1E21 to display as '1000000000000000000000'? Are you concerned with how the number is displayed, or how it is stored?
    – outis
    Nov 6 '09 at 6:19
  • 5
    i am concerned about how it is displayed: I have a document.write(myvariable) command
    – chris
    Nov 6 '09 at 6:20
  • 2
    i need the number as part of a URL
    – chris
    Nov 6 '09 at 21:43
  • 7
    @outis: Human users are not the only ones who want to read numbers. It seems D3 will throw an exception when encountering a translate transformation that contains coordinates in scientific notation. Sep 7 '17 at 9:05
  • 4
    There is still a use for this when you are dealing with numbers up to a certain size. Scientific notation will be hard to read for users who don't know scientific notation too after all. Sep 15 '17 at 3:08

23 Answers 23

150

There's Number.toFixed, but it uses scientific notation if the number is >= 1e21 and has a maximum precision of 20. Other than that, you can roll your own, but it will be messy.

function toFixed(x) {
  if (Math.abs(x) < 1.0) {
    var e = parseInt(x.toString().split('e-')[1]);
    if (e) {
        x *= Math.pow(10,e-1);
        x = '0.' + (new Array(e)).join('0') + x.toString().substring(2);
    }
  } else {
    var e = parseInt(x.toString().split('+')[1]);
    if (e > 20) {
        e -= 20;
        x /= Math.pow(10,e);
        x += (new Array(e+1)).join('0');
    }
  }
  return x;
}

Above uses cheap-'n'-easy string repetition ((new Array(n+1)).join(str)). You could define String.prototype.repeat using Russian Peasant Multiplication and use that instead.

This answer should only be applied to the context of the question: displaying a large number without using scientific notation. For anything else, you should use a BigInt library, such as BigNumber, Leemon's BigInt, or BigInteger. Going forward, the new native BigInt (note: not Leemon's) should be available; Chromium and browsers based on it (Chrome, the new Edge [v79+], Brave) and Firefox all have support; Safari's support is underway.

Here's how you'd use BigInt for it: BigInt(n).toString()

Example:

const n = 13523563246234613317632;
console.log("toFixed (wrong): " + n.toFixed());
console.log("BigInt (right):  " + BigInt(n).toString());

Beware, though, that any integer you output as a JavaScript number (not a BigInt) that's more than 15-16 digits (specifically, greater than Number.MAX_SAFE_INTEGER + 1 [9,007,199,254,740,992]) may be be rounded, because JavaScript's number type (IEEE-754 double-precision floating point) can't precisely hold all integers beyond that point. As of Number.MAX_SAFE_INTEGER + 1 it's working in multiples of 2, so it can't hold odd numbers anymore (and similiarly, at 18,014,398,509,481,984 it starts working in multiples of 4, then 8, then 16, ...).

Consequently, if you can rely on BigInt support, output your number as a string you pass to the BigInt function:

const n = BigInt("YourNumberHere");

Example:

const n1 = BigInt(18014398509481985); // WRONG, will round to 18014398509481984
                                      // before `BigInt` sees it
console.log(n1.toString() + " <== WRONG");
const n2 = BigInt("18014398509481985"); // RIGHT, BigInt handles it
console.log(n2.toString() + " <== Right");

12
  • 2
    Your solution gives me a very different result for 2^1000 than wolframalpha. Any pointers? Aug 10 '11 at 22:50
  • 5
    @Shane: This Q&A is about displaying floating point numbers as base-10 integers and doesn't address numbers that can't be represented in a floating point format (which will arise when converting to base 10). You need a JS bigint library, as is mentioned in the final line.
    – outis
    Aug 11 '11 at 1:05
  • 1
    @PeterOlson: look like I left out a Math.abs. Thanks for the heads-up.
    – outis
    Mar 23 '12 at 17:38
  • 1
    toFixed(Number.MAX_VALUE) == Number.MAX_VALUE should return true then, but it doesn't... Jan 17 '17 at 22:02
  • 3
    Actually this code as it is does not work for very small negative numbers: toFixed( -1E-20 ) -> "0.0000000000000000000.09999999999999999" Jun 15 '17 at 0:37
73

I know this is an older question, but shows recently active. MDN toLocaleString

const myNumb = 1000000000000000000000;
console.log( myNumb ); // 1e+21
console.log( myNumb.toLocaleString() ); // "1,000,000,000,000,000,000,000"
console.log( myNumb.toLocaleString('fullwide', {useGrouping:false}) ); // "1000000000000000000000"

you can use options to format the output.

Note:

Number.toLocaleString() rounds after 16 decimal places, so that...

const myNumb = 586084736227728377283728272309128120398;
console.log( myNumb.toLocaleString('fullwide', { useGrouping: false }) );

...returns...

586084736227728400000000000000000000000

This is perhaps undesirable if accuracy is important in the intended result.

9
  • 3
    This is the foolproof answer.
    – Aria
    Oct 27 '18 at 13:58
  • This doesn't work in PhantomJS 2.1.1 - it still ends up in scientific notation. Fine in Chrome. Mar 1 '19 at 14:43
  • 5
    This doesn't appear to work for very small decimals: var myNumb = 0.0000000001; console.log( myNumb.toLocaleString('fullwide', { useGrouping: false }) );
    – eh1160
    Aug 26 '19 at 14:15
  • 2
    One can set maximumSignificantDigits option (max 21) to format very small decimals, ie: js console.log( myNumb.toLocaleString('fullwide', { useGrouping: true, maximumSignificantDigits:6}) ); Nov 26 '19 at 2:56
  • maximumFractionDigits defaults to 3, so I think the actual sol'n is value.toLocaleString('fullwide',{useGrouping:false,maximumFractionDigits:20})
    – mpen
    May 2 at 23:57
25

For small number, and you know how many decimals you want, you can use toFixed and then use a regexp to remove the trailing zeros.

Number(1e-7).toFixed(8).replace(/\.?0+$/,"") //0.000
2
  • 35
    question literallly asked for large number
    – swyx
    Aug 11 '17 at 8:42
  • 2
    Be careful to avoid 0 as an argument of toFixed call - it will end up in erasing significant trailing zeros: (1000).toFixed(0).replace(/\.?0+$/,"") // 1, not 1000 Mar 1 '19 at 14:33
16

one more possible solution:

function toFix(i){
 var str='';
 do{
   let a = i%10;
   i=Math.trunc(i/10);
   str = a+str;
 }while(i>0)
 return str;
}
4
  • 7
    This doesn't preserve the original value...for instance 31415926535897932384626433832795 becomes 31415926535897938480804068462624
    – zero_cool
    Feb 2 '18 at 3:39
  • Not positive but likely to do with how JavaScript handles large numbers.
    – zero_cool
    Jan 13 '19 at 1:33
  • @domsson Basically because IEEE floating point numbers arithmetic apply. numbers in Javascript are actually represented as floating point number as well as "decimal numbers", there is no native "integer exact type". You can read more here : medium.com/dailyjs/javascripts-number-type-8d59199db1b6
    – Pac0
    Jan 28 '19 at 13:58
  • @zero_cool Any number greater than Number.MAX_SAFE_INTEGER is likely to suffer this problem.
    – Pac0
    Jan 28 '19 at 14:01
13

Here is my short variant of Number.prototype.toFixed method that works with any number:

Number.prototype.toFixedSpecial = function(n) {
  var str = this.toFixed(n);
  if (str.indexOf('e+') === -1)
    return str;

  // if number is in scientific notation, pick (b)ase and (p)ower
  str = str.replace('.', '').split('e+').reduce(function(b, p) {
    return b + Array(p - b.length + 2).join(0);
  });
  
  if (n > 0)
    str += '.' + Array(n + 1).join(0);
  
  return str;
};

console.log( 1e21.toFixedSpecial(2) );       // "1000000000000000000000.00"
console.log( 2.1e24.toFixedSpecial(0) );     // "2100000000000000000000000"
console.log( 1234567..toFixedSpecial(1) );   // "1234567.0"
console.log( 1234567.89.toFixedSpecial(3) ); // "1234567.890"

8
  • 5
    @manonthemat Of course they are not equal, because the first one is a formatted string and the second one is a Number. If you cast the first one to a Number, you will see that they are absolutely equal: jsfiddle.net/qd6hpnyx/1. You can take your downvote back :P
    – VisioN
    Jan 18 '17 at 22:50
  • fair enough.... I just noticed I can't, unless you're editing your answer. Jan 18 '17 at 23:03
  • Better to also replace any trailing .0 with empty string.
    – vsync
    Sep 11 '18 at 7:14
  • I get a somewhat strange value when I try console.log(2.2e307.toFixedSpecial(10)). I mean... I get several trailing zeros. Upvoting anyway because this seems closest to what I need. Oct 8 '19 at 20:42
  • @peter.petrov Yes, you have .0000000000 because you specified 10 as a parameter. If you want to get rid of them, use 0.
    – VisioN
    Oct 9 '19 at 9:40
10

Busting out the regular expressions. This has no precision issues and is not a lot of code.

function toPlainString(num) {
  return (''+ +num).replace(/(-?)(\d*)\.?(\d*)e([+-]\d+)/,
    function(a,b,c,d,e) {
      return e < 0
        ? b + '0.' + Array(1-e-c.length).join(0) + c + d
        : b + c + d + Array(e-d.length+1).join(0);
    });
}

console.log(toPlainString(12345e+12));
console.log(toPlainString(12345e+24));
console.log(toPlainString(-12345e+24));
console.log(toPlainString(12345e-12));
console.log(toPlainString(123e-12));
console.log(toPlainString(-123e-12));
console.log(toPlainString(-123.45e-56));
console.log(toPlainString('1e-8'));
console.log(toPlainString('1.0e-8'));

8
  • 3
    this worked for quoted plain number, unquoted plain number, quoted scientific notation, and unquoted scientific notation.
    – a_a
    Sep 17 '20 at 18:02
  • There is a bug in this. console.log(toPlainString("1e-8")); console.log(toPlainString("1.0e-8")); Do not give same result
    – otterslide
    Nov 17 '20 at 18:54
  • 1
    Still an issue. Try: console.log(toPlainString("1e-5")); console.log(toPlainString("1e-6")); console.log(toPlainString("1e-7")); The 1e-7 suddenly jumps to 8 decimal places, although 1,2,3,4,5,6 all work ok.
    – otterslide
    Nov 19 '20 at 17:44
  • 2
    @MohsenAlyafei (-0).toString() returns "0", and I'm not trying to go farther than expanding scientific notation here. That would require testing explicitly for -0 or using toLocaleString/Intl.NumberFormat. Feb 4 at 19:58
  • 1
    @MohsenAlyafei 0 === -0
    – dsasmblr
    Feb 21 at 17:18
7

The question of the post was avoiding e notation numbers and having the number as a plain number.

Therefore, if all is needed is to convert e (scientific) notation numbers to plain numbers (including in the case of fractional numbers) without loss of accuracy, then it is essential to avoid the use of the Math object and other javascript number methods so that rounding does not occur when large numbers and large fractions are handled (which always happens due to the internal storage in binary format).

The following function converts e (scientific) notation numbers to plain numbers (including fractions) handling both large numbers and large fractions without loss of accuracy as it does not use the built-in math and number functions to handle or manipulate the number.

The function also handles normal numbers, so that a number that is suspected to become in an 'e' notation can be passed to the function for fixing.

The function should work with different locale decimal points.

94 test cases are provided.

For large e-notation numbers pass the number as a string.

Examples:

eToNumber("123456789123456789.111122223333444455556666777788889999e+50");
// output:
"12345678912345678911112222333344445555666677778888999900000000000000"
eToNumber("123.456123456789123456895e-80");
// output:
"0.00000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000123456123456789123456895"
eToNumber("123456789123456789.111122223333444455556666777788889999e-50");
// output:
"0.00000000000000000000000000000000123456789123456789111122223333444455556666777788889999"

Valid e-notation numbers in Javascript include the following:

123e1   ==> 1230
123E1   ==> 1230
123e+1  ==> 1230
123.e+1 ==> 1230
123e-1  ==> 12.3
0.1e-1  ==> 0.01
.1e-1   ==> 0.01
-123e1  ==> -1230

/******************************************************************
 * Converts e-Notation Numbers to Plain Numbers
 ******************************************************************
 * @function eToNumber(number)
 * @version  1.00
 * @param   {e nottation Number} valid Number in exponent format.
 *          pass number as a string for very large 'e' numbers or with large fractions
 *          (none 'e' number returned as is).
 * @return  {string}  a decimal number string.
 * @author  Mohsen Alyafei
 * @date    17 Jan 2020
 * Note: No check is made for NaN or undefined input numbers.
 *
 *****************************************************************/
function eToNumber(num) {
  let sign = "";
  (num += "").charAt(0) == "-" && (num = num.substring(1), sign = "-");
  let arr = num.split(/[e]/ig);
  if (arr.length < 2) return sign + num;
  let dot = (.1).toLocaleString().substr(1, 1), n = arr[0], exp = +arr[1],
      w = (n = n.replace(/^0+/, '')).replace(dot, ''),
    pos = n.split(dot)[1] ? n.indexOf(dot) + exp : w.length + exp,
    L   = pos - w.length, s = "" + BigInt(w);
    w   = exp >= 0 ? (L >= 0 ? s + "0".repeat(L) : r()) : (pos <= 0 ? "0" + dot + "0".repeat(Math.abs(pos)) + s : r());
  L= w.split(dot); if (L[0]==0 && L[1]==0 || (+w==0 && +s==0) ) w = 0; //** added 9/10/2021
  return sign + w;
  function r() {return w.replace(new RegExp(`^(.{${pos}})(.)`), `$1${dot}$2`)}
}
//*****************************************************************

//================================================
//             Test Cases
//================================================
let r = 0; // test tracker
r |= test(1, "123456789123456789.111122223333444455556666777788889999e+50", "12345678912345678911112222333344445555666677778888999900000000000000");
r |= test(2, "123456789123456789.111122223333444455556666777788889999e-50", "0.00000000000000000000000000000000123456789123456789111122223333444455556666777788889999");
r |= test(3, "123456789e3", "123456789000");
r |= test(4, "123456789e1", "1234567890");
r |= test(5, "1.123e3", "1123");
r |= test(6, "12.123e3", "12123");
r |= test(7, "1.1234e1", "11.234");
r |= test(8, "1.1234e4", "11234");
r |= test(9, "1.1234e5", "112340");
r |= test(10, "123e+0", "123");
r |= test(11, "123E0", "123");
// //============================
r |= test(12, "123e-1", "12.3");
r |= test(13, "123e-2", "1.23");
r |= test(14, "123e-3", "0.123");
r |= test(15, "123e-4", "0.0123");
r |= test(16, "123e-2", "1.23");
r |= test(17, "12345.678e-1", "1234.5678");
r |= test(18, "12345.678e-5", "0.12345678");
r |= test(19, "12345.678e-6", "0.012345678");
r |= test(20, "123.4e-2", "1.234");
r |= test(21, "123.4e-3", "0.1234");
r |= test(22, "123.4e-4", "0.01234");
r |= test(23, "-123e+0", "-123");
r |= test(24, "123e1", "1230");
r |= test(25, "123e3", "123000");
r |= test(26, -1e33, "-1000000000000000000000000000000000");
r |= test(27, "123e+3", "123000");
r |= test(28, "123E+7", "1230000000");
r |= test(29, "-123.456e+1", "-1234.56");
r |= test(30, "-1.0e+1", "-10");
r |= test(31, "-1.e+1", "-10");
r |= test(32, "-1e+1", "-10");
r |= test(34, "-0", "-0");
r |= test(37, "0e0", "0");
r |= test(38, "123.456e+4", "1234560");
r |= test(39, "123E-0", "123");
r |= test(40, "123.456e+50", "12345600000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000");

r |= test(41, "123e-0", "123");
r |= test(42, "123e-1", "12.3");
r |= test(43, "123e-3", "0.123");
r |= test(44, "123.456E-1", "12.3456");
r |= test(45, "123.456123456789123456895e-80", "0.00000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000123456123456789123456895");
r |= test(46, "-123.456e-50", "-0.00000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000123456");

r |= test(47, "-0e+1", "-0");
r |= test(48, "0e+1", "0");
r |= test(49, "0.1e+1", "1");
r |= test(50, "-0.01e+1", "-0.1");
r |= test(51, "0.01e+1", "0.1");
r |= test(52, "-123e-7", "-0.0000123");
r |= test(53, "123.456e-4", "0.0123456");

r |= test(54, "1.e-5", "0.00001"); // handle missing base fractional part
r |= test(55, ".123e3", "123"); // handle missing base whole part

// The Electron's Mass:
r |= test(56, "9.10938356e-31", "0.000000000000000000000000000000910938356");
// The Earth's Mass:
r |= test(57, "5.9724e+24", "5972400000000000000000000");
// Planck constant:
r |= test(58, "6.62607015e-34", "0.000000000000000000000000000000000662607015");

r |= test(59, "0.000e3", "0");
r |= test(60, "0.000000000000000e3", "0");
r |= test(61, "-0.0001e+9", "-100000");
r |= test(62, "-0.0e1", "-0");
r |= test(63, "-0.0000e1", "-0");


r |= test(64, "1.2000e0", "1.2000");
r |= test(65, "1.2000e-0", "1.2000");
r |= test(66, "1.2000e+0", "1.2000");
r |= test(67, "1.2000e+10", "12000000000");
r |= test(68, "1.12356789445566771234e2", "112.356789445566771234");

// ------------- testing for Non e-Notation Numbers -------------
r |= test(69, "12345.7898", "12345.7898") // no exponent
r |= test(70, 12345.7898, "12345.7898") // no exponent
r |= test(71, 0.00000000000001, "0.00000000000001") // from 1e-14
r |= test(72, 0.0000000000001, "0.0000000000001") // from 1e-13
r |= test(73, 0.000000000001, "0.000000000001") // from 1e-12
r |= test(74, 0.00000000001, "0.00000000001") // from 1e-11
r |= test(75, 0.0000000001, "0.0000000001") // from 1e-10
r |= test(76, 0.000000001, "0.000000001") // from 1e-9
r |= test(77, 0.00000001, "0.00000001") // from 1e-8
r |= test(78, 0.0000001, "0.0000001") // from 1e-7
r |= test(79, 1e-7, "0.0000001") // from 1e-7
r |= test(80, -0.0000001, "-0.0000001") // from 1e-7
r |= test(81, 0.0000005, "0.0000005") // from 1e-7
r |= test(82, 0.1000005, "0.1000005") // from 1e-7
r |= test(83, 1e-6, "0.000001") // from 1e-6

r |= test(84, 0.000001, "0.000001"); // from 1e-6
r |= test(85, 0.00001, "0.00001"); // from 1e-5
r |= test(86, 0.0001, "0.0001"); // from 1e-4
r |= test(87, 0.001, "0.001"); // from 1e-3
r |= test(88, 0.01, "0.01"); // from 1e-2
r |= test(89, 0.1, "0.1") // from 1e-1
r |= test(90, -0.0000000000000345, "-0.0000000000000345"); // from -3.45e-14
r |= test(91, -0, "0");
r |= test(92, "-0", "-0");
r |= test(93,2e64,"20000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000");
r |= test(94,"2830869077153280552556547081187254342445169156730","2830869077153280552556547081187254342445169156730");

if (r == 0) console.log("All 94 tests passed.");

//================================================
//             Test function
//================================================
function test(testNumber, n1, should) {
  let result = eToNumber(n1);
  if (result !== should) {
    console.log(`Test ${testNumber} Failed. Output: ${result}\n             Should be: ${should}`);
    return 1;
  }
}

3
  • Are we sure this will always work in every country? I'm a bit concerned about this toLocaleString() but I have no way of testing it. Probably that no one does so we need to rely on our understanding of this function and make sure this is solid.
    – FlorianB
    Sep 24 at 16:33
  • @FlorianB I have tested it again extensively with different Locales using DevTools and works fine when the decimal separator is a dot "." or a comma ",". Found a very odd case when the number is 0,00 meaning 0.00 and fixed it. Oct 8 at 23:14
  • You've done a great job on this code. Question: Have you also written a tool that converts in the opposite direction? If so, I'd like to see that too. Oct 19 at 6:43
6

The following solution bypasses the automatic exponentional formatting for very big and very small numbers. This is outis's solution with a bugfix: It was not working for very small negative numbers.

function numberToString(num)
{
    let numStr = String(num);

    if (Math.abs(num) < 1.0)
    {
        let e = parseInt(num.toString().split('e-')[1]);
        if (e)
        {
            let negative = num < 0;
            if (negative) num *= -1
            num *= Math.pow(10, e - 1);
            numStr = '0.' + (new Array(e)).join('0') + num.toString().substring(2);
            if (negative) numStr = "-" + numStr;
        }
    }
    else
    {
        let e = parseInt(num.toString().split('+')[1]);
        if (e > 20)
        {
            e -= 20;
            num /= Math.pow(10, e);
            numStr = num.toString() + (new Array(e + 1)).join('0');
        }
    }

    return numStr;
}

// testing ...
console.log(numberToString(+0.0000000000000000001));
console.log(numberToString(-0.0000000000000000001));
console.log(numberToString(+314564649798762418795));
console.log(numberToString(-314564649798762418795));

2
  • 1
    numberToString(0.0000002) "0.00000019999999999999998"
    – sigmawf
    Jun 4 '18 at 5:36
  • 1
    @raphadko That's the notorious Javascript floating point precision problem, which is another completely different pain when using numbers in JS... See for example stackoverflow.com/questions/1458633/… Jul 5 '18 at 10:14
4

The answers of others do not give you the exact number!
This function calculates the desired number accurately and returns it in the string to prevent it from being changed by javascript!
If you need a numerical result, just multiply the result of the function in number one!

function toNonExponential(value) {
    // if value is not a number try to convert it to number
    if (typeof value !== "number") {
        value = parseFloat(value);

        // after convert, if value is not a number return empty string
        if (isNaN(value)) {
            return "";
        }
    }

    var sign;
    var e;

    // if value is negative, save "-" in sign variable and calculate the absolute value
    if (value < 0) {
        sign = "-";
        value = Math.abs(value);
    }
    else {
        sign = "";
    }

    // if value is between 0 and 1
    if (value < 1.0) {
        // get e value
        e = parseInt(value.toString().split('e-')[1]);

        // if value is exponential convert it to non exponential
        if (e) {
            value *= Math.pow(10, e - 1);
            value = '0.' + (new Array(e)).join('0') + value.toString().substring(2);
        }
    }
    else {
        // get e value
        e = parseInt(value.toString().split('e+')[1]);

        // if value is exponential convert it to non exponential
        if (e) {
            value /= Math.pow(10, e);
            value += (new Array(e + 1)).join('0');
        }
    }

    // if value has negative sign, add to it
    return sign + value;
}
2
  • Some additional information about this code only answer would probably be useful.
    – Pyves
    Jul 19 '17 at 8:22
  • Comments added to the function.
    – user1297556
    Apr 5 '19 at 6:36
2

Use .toPrecision, .toFixed, etc. You can count the number of digits in your number by converting it to a string with .toString then looking at its .length.

3
  • for some reason, toPrecision doesn't work. if you try: window.examplenum = 1352356324623461346, and then say alert(window.examplenum.toPrecision(20)), it doesn't pop up an alert
    – chris
    Nov 6 '09 at 6:05
  • actually it pops up sometimes showing scientific notation, and other times it doesn't pop up at all. what am i doing wrong?
    – chris
    Nov 6 '09 at 6:06
  • 20
    Neither of the suggestion methods work for large (or small) numbers. (2e64).toString() will return "2e+64", so .length is useless.
    – CodeManX
    Nov 5 '14 at 23:05
2

This is what I ended up using to take the value from an input, expanding numbers less than 17digits and converting Exponential numbers to x10y

// e.g.
//  niceNumber("1.24e+4")   becomes 
// 1.24x10 to the power of 4 [displayed in Superscript]

function niceNumber(num) {
  try{
        var sOut = num.toString();
      if ( sOut.length >=17 || sOut.indexOf("e") > 0){
      sOut=parseFloat(num).toPrecision(5)+"";
      sOut = sOut.replace("e","x10<sup>")+"</sup>";
      }
      return sOut;

  }
  catch ( e) {
      return num;
  }
}
2

Your question:

number :0x68656c6c6f206f72656f
display:4.9299704811152646e+23

You can use this: https://github.com/MikeMcl/bignumber.js

A JavaScript library for arbitrary-precision decimal and non-decimal arithmetic.

like this:

let ten =new BigNumber('0x68656c6c6f206f72656f',16);
console.log(ten.toString(10));
display:492997048111526447310191
1
  • well, beware that bignumber.js cant go beyond 15 significant digits ... Mar 29 '17 at 2:23
1

You can loop over the number and achieve the rounding

// functionality to replace char at given index

String.prototype.replaceAt=function(index, character) {
    return this.substr(0, index) + character + this.substr(index+character.length);
}

// looping over the number starts

var str = "123456789123456799.55";
var arr = str.split('.');
str = arr[0];
i = (str.length-1);
if(arr[1].length && Math.round(arr[1]/100)){
  while(i>0){
    var intVal = parseInt(str.charAt(i));

   if(intVal == 9){
      str = str.replaceAt(i,'0');
      console.log(1,str)
   }else{
      str = str.replaceAt(i,(intVal+1).toString()); 
      console.log(2,i,(intVal+1).toString(),str)
      break;
   }
   i--;
 }
}
1

I think there may be several similar answers, but here's a thing I came up with

// If you're gonna tell me not to use 'with' I understand, just,
// it has no other purpose, ;( andthe code actually looks neater
// 'with' it but I will edit the answer if anyone insists
var commas = false;

function digit(number1, index1, base1) {
    with (Math) {
        return floor(number1/pow(base1, index1))%base1;
    }
}

function digits(number1, base1) {
    with (Math) {
        o = "";
        l = floor(log10(number1)/log10(base1));
        for (var index1 = 0; index1 < l+1; index1++) {
            o = digit(number1, index1, base1) + o;
            if (commas && i%3==2 && i<l) {
                o = "," + o;
            }
        }
        return o;
    }
}

// Test - this is the limit of accurate digits I think
console.log(1234567890123450);

Note: this is only as accurate as the javascript math functions and has problems when using log instead of log10 on the line before the for loop; it will write 1000 in base-10 as 000 so I changed it to log10 because people will mostly be using base-10 anyways.

This may not be a very accurate solution but I'm proud to say it can successfully translate numbers across bases and comes with an option for commas!

1

You can use from-exponential module. It is lightweight and fully tested.

import fromExponential from 'from-exponential';

fromExponential(1.123e-10); // => '0.0000000001123'
0

I know it's many years later, but I had been working on a similar issue recently and I wanted to post my solution. The currently accepted answer pads out the exponent part with 0's, and mine attempts to find the exact answer, although in general it isn't perfectly accurate for very large numbers because of JS's limit in floating point precision.

This does work for Math.pow(2, 100), returning the correct value of 1267650600228229401496703205376.

function toFixed(x) {
  var result = '';
  var xStr = x.toString(10);
  var digitCount = xStr.indexOf('e') === -1 ? xStr.length : (parseInt(xStr.substr(xStr.indexOf('e') + 1)) + 1);
  
  for (var i = 1; i <= digitCount; i++) {
    var mod = (x % Math.pow(10, i)).toString(10);
    var exponent = (mod.indexOf('e') === -1) ? 0 : parseInt(mod.substr(mod.indexOf('e')+1));
    if ((exponent === 0 && mod.length !== i) || (exponent > 0 && exponent !== i-1)) {
      result = '0' + result;
    }
    else {
      result = mod.charAt(0) + result;
    }
  }
  return result;
}

console.log(toFixed(Math.pow(2,100))); // 1267650600228229401496703205376

3
  • @Oriol - yeah, you're right; I guess whatever I tried it with previously just worked out that way due to other factors. I'll remove that little note in my answer.
    – andi
    Jan 13 '17 at 6:18
  • 1
    doesn't work: toFixed(Number.MAX_VALUE) == Number.MAX_VALUE Jan 17 '17 at 22:05
  • this just accidentally works for powers of 2 because that's how floating point numbers are kept in memory. In fact if you subtract some number from Math.pow(2, 100) it will still give the same answer. It just loses precision if the number is higher than Number.MAX_SAFE_INTEGER = 9007199254740991. Any number higher than this is not stored precisely so it's not possible to read it back
    – Adassko
    Sep 24 '20 at 17:06
0

If you are just doing it for display, you can build an array from the digits before they're rounded.

var num = Math.pow(2, 100);
var reconstruct = [];
while(num > 0) {
    reconstruct.unshift(num % 10);
    num = Math.floor(num / 10);
}
console.log(reconstruct.join(''));
1
  • This will return the right answer, but will take so much time and might end up for the execution to time out.
    – Hannah May
    Sep 6 '18 at 2:58
0

I tried working with the string form rather than the number and this seemed to work. I have only tested this on Chrome but it should be universal:

function removeExponent(s) {
    var ie = s.indexOf('e');
    if (ie != -1) {
        if (s.charAt(ie + 1) == '-') {
            // negative exponent, prepend with .0s
            var n = s.substr(ie + 2).match(/[0-9]+/);
            s = s.substr(2, ie - 2); // remove the leading '0.' and exponent chars
            for (var i = 0; i < n; i++) {
                s = '0' + s;
            }
            s = '.' + s;
        } else {
            // positive exponent, postpend with 0s
            var n = s.substr(ie + 1).match(/[0-9]+/);
            s = s.substr(0, ie); // strip off exponent chars            
            for (var i = 0; i < n; i++) {
                s += '0';
            }       
        }
    }
    return s;
}
1
  • The function failed on some numbers. Please see the test cases in my post above. Thanks. Feb 5 at 23:36
0

Currently there is no native function to dissolve scientific notation. However, for this purpose you must write your own functionality.

Here is my:

function dissolveExponentialNotation(number)
{
    if(!Number.isFinite(number)) { return undefined; }

    let text = number.toString();
    let items = text.split('e');

    if(items.length == 1) { return text; }

    let significandText = items[0];
    let exponent = parseInt(items[1]);

    let characters = Array.from(significandText);
    let minus = characters[0] == '-';
    if(minus) { characters.splice(0, 1); }
    let indexDot = characters.reduce((accumulator, character, index) =>
    {
        if(!accumulator.found) { if(character == '.') { accumulator.found = true; } else { accumulator.index++; } }
        return accumulator;
    }, { index: 0, found: false }).index;

    characters.splice(indexDot, 1);

    indexDot += exponent;

    if(indexDot >= 0 && indexDot < characters.length - 1)
    {
        characters.splice(indexDot, 0, '.');
    }
    else if(indexDot < 0)
    {
        characters.unshift("0.", "0".repeat(-indexDot));
    }
    else
    {
        characters.push("0".repeat(indexDot - characters.length));
    }

    return (minus ? "-" : "") + characters.join("");
}
1
  • 1
    This fails for really big numbers. I tried 2830869077153280552556547081187254342445169156730 and got 2830869077153280500000000000000000000000000000000
    – callback
    Oct 17 '19 at 9:12
-1

You can also use YourJS.fullNumber. For instance YourJS.fullNumber(Number.MAX_VALUE) results in the following: 179769313486231570000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000

It also works for really small numbers. YourJS.fullNumber(Number.MIN_VALUE) returns this: 0.000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000005

It is important to note that this function will always return finite numbers as strings but will return non-finite numbers (eg. NaN or Infinity) as undefined.

You can test it out in the YourJS Console here.

-2
function printInt(n) { return n.toPrecision(100).replace(/\..*/,""); }

with some issues:

  • 0.9 is displayed as "0"
  • -0.9 is displayed as "-0"
  • 1e100 is displayed as "1"
  • works only for numbers up to ~1e99 => use other constant for greater numbers; or smaller for optimization.
1
  • Yeah those are some issues. May 4 '20 at 13:15
-3

You can use number.toString(10.1):

console.log(Number.MAX_VALUE.toString(10.1));

Note: This currently works in Chrome, but not in Firefox. The specification says the radix has to be an integer, so this results in unreliable behavior.

3
  • what the heck does this do? A radix of 10.1?
    – joniba
    Nov 3 '16 at 13:47
  • This doesn't work. Since ES5, implementations are required to use ToInteger on the argument. So using 10.1 or 10 or nothing are equivalent.
    – Oriol
    Jan 12 '17 at 22:42
  • Yes, this has indeed stopped working somewhat recently. Kinda sad, but this answer is now irrelevant. Jan 13 '17 at 23:36
-7

I had the same issue with oracle returning scientic notation, but I needed the actual number for a url. I just used a PHP trick by subtracting zero, and I get the correct number.

for example 5.4987E7 is the val.

newval = val - 0;

newval now equals 54987000

1
  • 2
    This has no effect. 5.4987E7 has an exponent less than 21, so it shows up as the full number regardless when converted to string. (5.4987E21 - 0).toString() => "5.4987e+21"
    – Dwight
    Oct 10 '13 at 23:19

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