55

I'm coding a REST API with Django REST framework. The API will be the backend of a social mobile app. After following the tutorial, I can serialise all my models and I am able to create new resources and update them.

I'm using AuthToken for authentication.

My question is:

Once I have the /users resource, I want the app user to be able to register. So, is it better to have a separate resource like /register or allow anonymous users to POST to /users a new resource?

Also, some guidance about permissions would be great.

38

I went ahead and made my own custom view for handling registration since my serializer doesn't expect to show/retrieve the password. I made the url different from the /users resource.

My url conf:

url(r'^users/register', 'myapp.views.create_auth'),

My view:

@api_view(['POST'])
def create_auth(request):
    serialized = UserSerializer(data=request.DATA)
    if serialized.is_valid():
        User.objects.create_user(
            serialized.init_data['email'],
            serialized.init_data['username'],
            serialized.init_data['password']
        )
        return Response(serialized.data, status=status.HTTP_201_CREATED)
    else:
        return Response(serialized._errors, status=status.HTTP_400_BAD_REQUEST)

I may be wrong, but it doesn't seem like you'll need to limit permissions on this view since you'd want unauthenticated requests ...

  • 8
    wanted to point out that the reason Cahlan is using init_data instead of data is because UserSerializer doesn't read/write passwords. after calling is_valid(), it's fine if someone wants to use serialized.data['email'] and serialized.data['username'] but password will only be available in serialized.init_data['password']. Also the order of email and username params should be switched (at least in Django 1.6). or you can always pass named parameters e.g. User.objects.create_user(email='me@example.com', username='admin', password='admin123') – user83950 Feb 13 '14 at 14:19
  • Just curious wouldn't this solution be insecure ? this means that any body with knowledge of this endpoint and keep registering users ? – DjangoRocks Sep 22 '14 at 7:20
  • 1
    @DjangoRocks you are right, but you can use throttling – yossi Apr 18 '15 at 22:27
  • 1
    @yossi The solution is to use CAPTCHA. Throttling doesn't completely address the issue. – Purrell Dec 23 '16 at 6:02
  • is there any way to insert username as email in serialized data? – Hardik Gajjar Mar 25 '17 at 9:29
65

Django REST Framework 3 allow override create method in serializers:

from rest_framework import serializers
from django.contrib.auth import get_user_model # If used custom user model

UserModel = get_user_model()


class UserSerializer(serializers.ModelSerializer):

    password = serializers.CharField(write_only=True)

    def create(self, validated_data):

        user = UserModel.objects.create(
            username=validated_data['username']
        )
        user.set_password(validated_data['password'])
        user.save()

        return user

    class Meta:
        model = UserModel
        # Tuple of serialized model fields (see link [2])
        fields = ( "id", "username", "password", )

Serialized fields for classes inherited from ModelSerializer must be declared patently in Meta for Django Rest Framework v3.5 and newest.

File api.py:

from rest_framework import permissions
from rest_framework.generics import CreateAPIView
from django.contrib.auth import get_user_model # If used custom user model

from .serializers import UserSerializer


class CreateUserView(CreateAPIView):

    model = get_user_model()
    permission_classes = [
        permissions.AllowAny # Or anon users can't register
    ]
    serializer_class = UserSerializer
  • 2
    This is the fastest and most up to date way to do this. – SeedyROM May 21 '17 at 17:06
33

The simplest solution, working in DRF 3.x:

class UserSerializer(serializers.ModelSerializer):
    class Meta:
        model = User
        fields = ('id', 'username', 'password', 'email', 'first_name', 'last_name')
        write_only_fields = ('password',)
        read_only_fields = ('id',)

    def create(self, validated_data):
        user = User.objects.create(
            username=validated_data['username'],
            email=validated_data['email'],
            first_name=validated_data['first_name'],
            last_name=validated_data['last_name']
        )

        user.set_password(validated_data['password'])
        user.save()

        return user

No need for other changes, just make sure that unauthenticated users have the permission to create a new user object.

write_only_fields will make sure passwords (actually: their hash we store) are not displayed, while the overwritten create method ensures that the password is not stored in clear text, but as a hash.

  • Sorry if I'm wrong, but is it explicitely needed to override the create method? I tried just adding the write_only_fields and read_only_fields and it worked as I expected it to. Any clues? – vabada Dec 21 '15 at 14:20
  • 6
    @dabad If you do that, the password will probably get stored in clear text in the database, something you absolutely don't want. The only line the custom create method adds is the Django-native set_password method to generate a hash for the password. – cpury Dec 22 '15 at 22:59
26

I updated Cahlan's answer to support custom user models from Django 1.5 and return the user's ID in the response.

from django.contrib.auth import get_user_model

from rest_framework import status, serializers
from rest_framework.decorators import api_view
from rest_framework.response import Response

class UserSerializer(serializers.ModelSerializer):
    class Meta:
        model = get_user_model()

@api_view(['POST'])
def register(request):
    VALID_USER_FIELDS = [f.name for f in get_user_model()._meta.fields]
    DEFAULTS = {
        # you can define any defaults that you would like for the user, here
    }
    serialized = UserSerializer(data=request.DATA)
    if serialized.is_valid():
        user_data = {field: data for (field, data) in request.DATA.items() if field in VALID_USER_FIELDS}
        user_data.update(DEFAULTS)
        user = get_user_model().objects.create_user(
            **user_data
        )
        return Response(UserSerializer(instance=user).data, status=status.HTTP_201_CREATED)
    else:
        return Response(serialized._errors, status=status.HTTP_400_BAD_REQUEST)
  • How are you handling the password here? – dangonfast Jan 12 '16 at 8:03
  • 12
    DANGER If I'm not mistaken, this code allows submission of is_superuser and is_staff values. Allowed fields should be specified explicitly IMO, as shown in the other examples. – Marcel Chastain Oct 6 '16 at 23:59
25

I typically treat the User view just like any other API endpoint that required authorization, except I just override the view class's permission set with my own for POST (aka create). I typically use this pattern:

from django.contrib.auth import get_user_model
from rest_framework import viewsets
from rest_framework.permissions import AllowAny


class UserViewSet(viewsets.ModelViewSet):
    queryset = get_user_model().objects
    serializer_class = UserSerializer

    def get_permissions(self):
        if self.request.method == 'POST':
            self.permission_classes = (AllowAny,)

        return super(UserViewSet, self).get_permissions()

For good measure, here is the serializer I typically use with it:

class UserSerializer(serializers.ModelSerializer):

    class Meta:
        model = get_user_model()
        fields = (
            'id',
            'username',
            'password',
            'email',
            ...,
        )
        extra_kwargs = {
            'password': {'write_only': True},
        }

    def create(self, validated_data):
        user = get_user_model().objects.create_user(**validated_data)
        return user

    def update(self, instance, validated_data):
        if 'password' in validated_data:
            password = validated_data.pop('password')
            instance.set_password(password)
        return super(UserSerializer, self).update(instance, validated_data)

djangorestframework 3.3.x / Django 1.8.x

7

@cpury above suggested using write_only_fields option. This however did not work for me in DRF 3.3.3

In DRF 3.0 the write_only_fields option on ModelSerializer has been moved to PendingDeprecation and in DRF 3.2 replaced with a more generic extra_kwargs:

extra_kwargs = {'password': {'write_only': True}}

4

All of the answers so far create the user, then update the user's password. This results in an two DB writes. To avoid an extra unnecessary DB write, set the user's password before saving it:

from rest_framework.serializers import ModelSerializer

class UserSerializer(ModelSerializer):

    class Meta:
        model = User

    def create(self, validated_data):
        user = User(**validated_data)
        # Hash the user's password.
        user.set_password(validated_data['password'])
        user.save()
        return user
2

A little late to the party, but might help someone who do not want to write more lines of code.

We can user the super method to achieve this.

class UserSerializer(serializers.ModelSerializer):

    password = serializers.CharField(
          write_only=True,
    )

    class Meta:
       model = User
       fields = ('password', 'username', 'first_name', 'last_name',)

    def create(self, validated_data):
        user = super(UserSerializer, self).create(validated_data)
        if 'password' in validated_data:
              user.set_password(validated_data['password'])
              user.save()
        return user
  • will I have to set a different url for the registerations? – Bernard 'Beta Berlin' Parah Jun 17 '16 at 23:46
  • Here's an extra bit for those wanting to keep the password field hidden : class UserSerializer(serializers.HyperlinkedModelSerializer): password = serializers.CharField( write_only=True, style={'input_type': 'password', 'placeholder': 'Password'}, ) – timi95 Feb 18 at 0:09
0

A Python 3, Django 2 & Django REST Framework viewset based implementation:

File: serializers.py

from rest_framework.serializers import ModelSerializers
from django.contrib.auth import get_user_model

UserModel = get_user_model()

class UserSerializer(ModelSerializer):
    password = serializers.CharField(write_only=True)

    def create(self, validated_data):
        user = UserModel.objects.create_user(
            username=validated_data['username'],
            password=validated_data['password'],
            first_name=validated_data['first_name'],
            last_name=validated_data['last_name'],
        )
        return user

    class Meta:
        model = UserModel
        fields = ('password', 'username', 'first_name', 'last_name',)

File views.py:

from rest_framework.viewsets import GenericViewSet
from rest_framework.mixins import CreateModelMixin
from django.contrib.auth import get_user_model
from .serializers import UserSerializer

class CreateUserView(CreateModelMixin, GenericViewSet):
    queryset = get_user_model().objects.all()
    serializer_class = UserSerializer

File urls.py

from rest_framework.routers import DefaultRouter
from .views import CreateUserView

router = DefaultRouter()
router.register(r'createuser', CreateUserView)

urlpatterns = router.urls

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