2

I have some code that looks like below. I'm new to IoC and Ninject and don't know how to inject IOtherClass into SomeService so that the Parallel.ForEach works. My only other guess is to move the Parallel.ForEach into the DoWork method?

Thanks for any help.

public class SomeService
{
    Parallel.Foreach(items, item =>
                       new OtherClass.DoWork(item);
}

public class OtherClass:IOtherClass
{
    public void DoWork()
    {...}
}
5

When applying dependency injection, you like to move the control of the composition of graphs of related object to a single place in the application called the Composition Root.

To remove complexity in the rest of the application, only the composition root should know which instances to create and how to create them. The composition root is the only one to know how object graphs are built and it knows (or at least when writing your DI configuration you should know) if services can safely depend on each other. Problems with thread-safety should be spotted here.

An implementation itself should not have to know whether it is safe to use the dependency; it must be able to assume that that dependency is safe to use on the thread it is running. Besides the usual transient and singleton lifestyles (where transient means that a new instance is created where singleton means that the application will only have one instance of that service) there are often other lifestyles that have a thread affinity. Take for instance the Per Web Request lifestyles.

So the general advice is to:

  • Let the IoC container resolve all objects for you, and
  • Don't move services from thread to thread.

Your SomeService implementation is correct from a thread-safety perspective, since each thread creates its own new (transient) OtherClass instance. But this starts to become problematic when OtherClass starts to have dependencies on its own. In that case you should move the creation of that object to your composition root. However, if you implement that as in the following example, you will have a problem:

public class SomeService
{
    private IOtherClass other;
    public SomeService(IOtherClass other)
    {
        this.other = other;
    }

    public void Operate(Items items)
    {   
        Parallel.Foreach(items, item => this.other.DoWork(item));
    }
}

The implementation is problematic, because SomeService moves a single IOtherClass instance across threads and assumes that IOtherClass is thread-safe, which is knowledge that only the composition root should know. Dispersing this knowledge throughout the application increases complexity.

When dealing with multi-threaded code, every thread should get its own object graph. This means that when starting a new thread, you should query the container/kernel again for a root object and call that object. Like this:

public class SomeService
{
    private IItemProcessor processor;

    public SomeService(IItemProcessor processor)
    {
        this.processor = processor;
    }

    public void Operate(Items items)
    {
        this.processor.Process(items);
    }
}

public class ItemProcessor : IItemProcessor
{
    private IKernel container;

    public ItemProcessor(IKernel container)
    {
        this.container = container;
    }

    public void Process(Items items)
    {
        Parallel.Foreach(items, item =>
        {
            // request a new IOtherClass again on each thread.          
            var other = this.container.Get<IOtherClass>();
            other.DoWork(item);
        });    
    }
}

This deliberately extracts the mechanics about processing those items into a different class. This allows keeping the business logic in the SomeService and allows to move the ItemProcessor (which should only contain mechanics) into the composition root so the use of the Service Locator anti-pattern is prevented.

This article explains more about working with DI in multi-threaded applications. Note that it's documentation for a different framework, but the general advice is the same.

  • Thank you for the great explanation and example. I was able to understand and implement! – NBPC77 May 31 '13 at 17:58
  • Injection of IKernel into ItemProcessor is not a good idea because business class knows about Ninject. Better way is to inject of delegate like Func<IOtherClass>. – mtkachenko Aug 5 '16 at 11:37
  • 1
    @mtkachenko: As I explained in my answer, the ItemProcessor should be part of the Composition Root, which means it is not a business component anymore, but an infrastructural component. – Steven Aug 5 '16 at 13:24
  • 1
    Ah, ok, I've got it. – mtkachenko Aug 5 '16 at 13:36
0

It's not obvious from your code if you are required to create new instance of OtherClass on every iteration of the loop? And I suppose that IOtherClass interface contains DoWork method? If you can go with the same instance in every iteration then the correct way would be constructor injection.

in the constructor of the SomeService you inject IOtherClass

public class SomeService
{
    private readonly IOtherClass _otherClass;
    public SomeService(IOtherClass otherClass)
    {
        _otherClass = otherClass;
    }

    void YourLoopMethod()
    {
       Parallel.Foreach(items, item =>_otherClass.DoWork(item));
    }
 }

If you need new instance in every iteration of the loop, than maybe you could go with "other class factory" that is injected into SomeService

public interface IOtherClassFactory
{
    IOtherClass Create();
}

public class SomeService
{
    private readonly IOtherClassFactory _otherClassFactory;
    public SomeService(IOtherClassFactory otherClassFactory)
    {
        _otherClassFactory = otherClassFactory;
    }

    void YourLoopMethod()
    {
       Parallel.Foreach(items, item =>
                   _otherClassFactory.Create().DoWork(item));
    }
 }

Here you need to implement IOtherClassFactory that knows how to create IOtherClass objects. In your implementation you can inject IKernel dependency and use it to create IOtherClass objects.

And for both scenarios you need to register Ninject kernel bindings in your composition root.

   kernel.Bind<IOtherClas>().To<OtherClass>();
  • I'm sorry, although your answer is pragmatic, I disagree with your advice. Both injecting an IOtherClass and IOtherClassFactory will force the SomeService to assume that these dependencies are thread-safe, knowledge that implementations should not have to care about. – Steven May 31 '13 at 15:28
  • @Steven Well you answer is great, i agree with all you said. But in my second scenario with IOtherClassFactory i proposed similar solution, that creates new object graph for every Parallel for iteration with IKernel injected into factory. Your solution is assuming that IKernel is thread safe.. at the end it all comes down to the component documentation. Someone could inject some other IKernel implementation into your ItemProcessor maybe, and then you are in the same boat as i see it. – jure May 31 '13 at 15:41
  • I agree that using the factory is a gray area, since they are often singletons and therefore thread-safe. Stll ths is an assumption and information is leaking out of you composition root. My solution assumes your DI container is thread safe, that's true. But you have to know your DI framework when maintaining your composition root; there's no alternative (except not using a di framework). But the advantage of this way of programming is that the rest of the application doesn't have to know. – Steven May 31 '13 at 22:36

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.