6

The JDK 7 Java docs suggest the following two idioms for creating Java threads:

  1. Extend Thread and override run()

    class PrimeThread extends Thread {
     long minPrime;
     PrimeThread(long minPrime) {
         this.minPrime = minPrime;
     }
    
     public void run() {
         // compute primes larger than minPrime
          . . .
     }
    }
    
    ...
    
    //And to launch the custom Thread
    
    PrimeThread p = new PrimeThread(143);
    
    p.start();
    
  2. Implement Runnable and create a new Thread passing the Runnable impl into its constructor

    class PrimeRun implements Runnable {
     long minPrime;
     PrimeRun(long minPrime) {
         this.minPrime = minPrime;
     }
    
     public void run() {
         // compute primes larger than minPrime
          . . .
     }
    }
    
    ...
    
    //And to launch a new Thread with this Runnable's behavior
    
    PrimeRun p = new PrimeRun(143);
    
    new Thread(p).start();
    

These are fine enough, but I'd like to be able to create a subclass of Thread and then define and set its Runnable implementation sometime later (e.g. not just in the Thread's constructor). From what I can tell, Java's Thread class does not provide a means to accomplish this so I came up with the following:

public class FlexiThread extends Thread{


//The Runnable impl to be executed
private Runnable mvRunner;

//Construct an empty subclass of Thread
public FlexiThread(){
    super();

}

//Construct a subclass of Thread which provides 
//its Runnable impl immediately
public FlexiThread(Runnable r){
    super(r);
    mvRunner = r;

}

/**
 * 
 * @return -- the Runnable implementation whose 
 * run() method will be invoked when this thread
 * is started
 */
public Runnable getRunnableToExecute(){
    return mvRunner;
}
/**
 * @param runner -- the Runnable implementation whose 
 * run() method will be invoked when this thread
 * is started
 */ 
public void setRunnableToExecute(Runnable runner){
    mvRunner = runner;
}


@Override
public void run(){
    mvRunner.run();
}

}

I tested FlexiThread and it appears to work as expected (it executes whatever code I give in the Runnable impl's run method in a separate thread of execution verified via DDMS) at least on Android ICS and JB; is there anything wrong/potentially dangerous/inefficient with the FlexiThread strategy given above? If so, what might be a better way to define a Thread subclass's Runnable after its construction?

3
  • Why do you want to extend Thread? Why can't you just extend Runnable?
    – Xeon
    May 31, 2013 at 15:25
  • 1
    What's the real difference between your flexi and usual old ways? You need to set runnable before calling start() anyway. May 31, 2013 at 15:26
  • AFAIK Android only supports Java 6. May 31, 2013 at 15:40

2 Answers 2

11

I would use an Executor as this is re-useable and controlable.

ExecutorService es = Executors.newSingleThreadedPool();

// set a runnable later.
es.submit(new MyRunnable());

// give it another runnable when that finishes.
es.submit(new MyRunnable2());

// don't need it any more
es.shutdown();
0
3

is there anything wrong/potentially dangerous/inefficient with the FlexiThread strategy given above

I'd say no, it's fine although it seems dangerous to me to construct a thread that can't be started until later. Certainly you should add some good code comments explaining what is going on. I'd also add some throws with good messages when you try to start the thread if the mvRunner has not been been set.

One improvement is to not extend thread but create a FlexiRunnable instead:

public class FlexiRunnable implements Runnable {
     private Runnable delegate;
     private volatile boolean running = false;
     public void run() {
         running = true;
         if (delegate != null) {
            delegate.run();
         }
     }
     public void setDelegate(Runnable delegate) {
         if (running) {
            throw new IllegateStateException("The thread is already running...");
         }
         this.delegate = delegate;
     }
}

...
FlexiRunnable flexi = new FlexiRunnable();
Thread thread = new Thread(flexi);
... 
flexi.setDelegate(...);
thread.start();
2
  • 1
    How about using Executors?
    – Fildor
    May 31, 2013 at 15:36
  • Yeah you are correct @Fildor. Peter's answer was the right one.
    – Gray
    Jun 3, 2013 at 17:52

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