9

I have a function of the form

template<int a, int b>
void f();

That I'd like to specialize when a == b. Pseudocode looks something like:

template<int a>
void f<a, a>(){ //something}

template<int a, int b>
void f<a, b>(){ //something different}

Is this possible without partial template specialization issues?

Edit: Thanks for the quick reply. The method is actually inside of a class, more like this:

<typename a> class A{ 
    template<int b, int c> f(); 
}; 

A inst; 
inst.f<1,1>(); 
inst.f<1,2>(); 

1 Answer 1

9

You cannot partially specialize a function template, but you can partially specialize a class template.

This leaves room for the following trick, where the actual work is being done by static member functions of a primary function template and a specialized function template, to which your original f() function delegates its responsibility:

#include <iostream>

namespace detail
{
    template<int A, int B>
    struct helper
    {
        static void call() { std::cout << "f<A, B>()" << std::endl; }
    };

    template<int A>
    struct helper<A, A>
    {
        static void call() { std::cout << "f<A, A>()" << std::endl; }
    };
}

template<int a, int b>
void f()
{
    detail::helper<a, b>::call();
}

This is how you could use your f() function template:

int main()
{
    f<1, 2>();
    f<1, 1>();
}

Here is a live example.

EDIT:

If your function template is a member function, things get slightly more complicated, but the solution outlined above for turning function template partial specialization into class template partial specialization is still viable.

This is how you would go about it based on the example provided in the comments.

First, forward-declare the helper class template and grant its instantiations the right to access your class template A's private members (the role of the additional type parameter T will become clear in a moment):

namespace detail
{
    template<typename T, int A, int B>
    struct helper;
}

template <typename a>
class A
{
public:
    template<int b, int c>
    void f();
private:
    template<typename, int, int> friend struct detail::helper;
};

Then you would define the helper class template and its specialization as done before, but adding a function parameter to the call() functions of the type necessary to manipulate the class object on which the original member function f() has been invoked:

namespace detail
{
    template<typename T, int A, int B>
    struct helper
    {
        static void call(T* p) { std::cout << "f<A, B>()" << std::endl; }
    };

    template<typename T, int A>
    struct helper<T, A, A>
    {
        static void call(T* p) { std::cout << "f<A, A>()" << std::endl; }
    };
}

Then you could define the member function f() as shown below:

template<typename a>
template<int b, int c>
void A<a>::f()
{
    detail::helper<A<a>, b, c>::call(this);
}

And eventually use it this way:

int main()
{
    A<int> inst;
    inst.f<1,1>();
    inst.f<1,2>();
}

This is all put together in this live example.

5
  • Very cool. What changes do I need to make to use it as a class member function? I can't make the structs static members of the class since I need to access class members.
    – Ben Jones
    Commented May 31, 2013 at 21:29
  • @BenJones: I don't understand your question. It seems like you're talking about some different scenario than the one you've shown in your question text. Can you please clarify?
    – Andy Prowl
    Commented May 31, 2013 at 21:30
  • Sure. I may have oversimplified what I'm trying to do. I'm trying to do something like this: template <typename a> class A{ template<int b, int c> f(); }; A inst; inst.f<1,1>(); inst.f<1,2>();
    – Ben Jones
    Commented May 31, 2013 at 21:31
  • @BenJones: Your comment got truncated. Perhaps consider editing the question (or asking a new question if the edit would be too radical)
    – Andy Prowl
    Commented May 31, 2013 at 21:32
  • @BenJones: It gets slightly more complicated, but you can still do it. I am going to edit the answer
    – Andy Prowl
    Commented May 31, 2013 at 21:39

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