62

Is there a shorter way of writing something like this:

if(x==1 || x==2 || x==3) // do something

What I'm looking for is something like this:

if(x.in((1,2,3)) // do something
  • 6
    if(x>=1 && x<=3)? – vcsjones May 31 '13 at 21:22
  • 3
    What's wrong with your way? Do you have many more comparisons? Because the former (for only 3 or even 4 comparisons) is usually more readable than the latter. – dlev May 31 '13 at 21:23
  • 2
    What's wrong with the first one? It's short enough, explains itself and is as efficient as you're going to get. – Dave Zych May 31 '13 at 21:23
  • 1
    +1 When you do x == A || x == B || x == C || ... || x == Z what you are expressing is: x is in the set {A, B, C, ..., Z}? hence the most clear syntax would be x in {A,B,C, ..., Z}. The || should be used when the conditions are different one from the other. – Bakuriu Jun 1 '13 at 7:38
67

You could achieve this by using the List.Contains method:

if(new []{1, 2, 3}.Contains(x))
{
    //x is either 1 or 2 or 3
}
  • I put this in the same class – user1854438 May 31 '13 at 22:01
  • When I run this, I get "System.Array does not implement Contains". You are attempting to apply a list method, which exists within System.Collections.Generic against an array method, which exists within System. – J Weezy Dec 10 '20 at 21:30
36
public static bool In<T>(this T x, params T[] set)
{
    return set.Contains(x);
}

...

if (x.In(1, 2, 3)) 
{ ... }

Required reading: MSDN Extension methods

  • 5
    Can even update this to use params so you'd get something like x.In(1, 2, 3) EDIT: Of course, at that point you could write x.In() which is a bit silly. (on the other hand, avoids the existing IEnumerable<T> version where you could pass in x.In(null) and throw an exception) – Chris Sinclair May 31 '13 at 21:24
  • 2
    Could be better, have you heard of params? – It'sNotALie. May 31 '13 at 21:24
  • 2
    While this is definitely elegant, I personally hate extensions methods that apply to everything. +1 just the same, though: I like elegance :) – dlev May 31 '13 at 21:25
  • I keep getting this error "extension method can only be declared in non-generic non-static class' – user1854438 May 31 '13 at 22:01
  • @user1854438: No. this has to be in a separate public class. I've updated the answer to include a link that should get you going on extension methods. – Austin Salonen May 31 '13 at 22:02
12

If it's in an IEnumerable<T>, use this:

if (enumerable.Any(n => n == value)) //whatever

Else, here's a short extension method:

public static bool In<T>(this T value, params T[] input)
{
    return input.Any(n => object.Equals(n, value));
} 

Put it in a static class, and you can use it like this:

if (x.In(1,2,3)) //whatever
  • And FGITW strikes again! Ugh. – It'sNotALie. May 31 '13 at 21:25
  • I think you want n => object.Equals(n, value), since a) that guards against null, and b) ensures that non-value types have a chance at value equality. (I think using Contains() instead of Any() will accomplish the same thing.) – dlev May 31 '13 at 21:27
  • Oh and dont forget the closing parenthesis – Isaac May 31 '13 at 21:29
1
int x = 1;
if((new List<int> {1, 2, 3}).Contains(x))
{
}
0

I'm entirely guessing here, correct the code if I'm wrong:

(new int[]{1,2,3}).IndexOf(x)>-1
-3

You can create a simple Dictionary<TKey, TValue> that'll be used as a Decision Table for that problem:

        //Create your decision-table Dictionary
        Action actionToPerform1 = () => Console.WriteLine("The number is okay");
        Action actionToPerform2 = () => Console.WriteLine("The number is not okay");
        var decisionTable = new Dictionary<int, Action>
            {
                {1, actionToPerform1},
                {2, actionToPerform1},
                {3, actionToPerform1},
                {4, actionToPerform2},
                {5, actionToPerform2},
                {6, actionToPerform2}
            };

        //According to the given number, the right *Action* will be called.
        int theNumberToTest = 3;
        decisionTable[theNumberToTest](); //actionToPerform1 will be called in that case.

Once you've initialized your Dictionary, all left to do is:

decisionTable[theNumberToTest]();

  • 2
    This is one of the smallest individual units of over-engineering I've ever seen. Given the context. – Grant Thomas May 31 '13 at 22:14
  • This is one of the cleanest and fastest methods. This is all what you need to do to perform your if condition: decisionTable[theNumberToTest](); – Yair Nevet May 31 '13 at 22:19
  • 1
    I like it when people use O(?) to try and prove something is 'faster' than another. It smells of fresh meat with a hint of mint. – NPSF3000 May 31 '13 at 22:23
  • If you're only doing the test once, then this could easily be slower than Contains -- building the dictionary is O(n), just like building & scanning the list. – Ryan M May 31 '13 at 22:24
  • @Ryan The Dictionary can be build only once. – Yair Nevet May 31 '13 at 22:25
-4

This answer refers to a possible future version of C# ;-) If you consider switching to Visual Basic, or if Microsoft finally decides to introduce the Select Case statement to C#, it would look like this:

Select Case X
    Case 1, 2, 3
    ...
End Select

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