54

If I don't know how long the word is, I cannot write char m[6];,
The length of the word is maybe ten or twenty long. How can I use scanf to get input from the keyboard?

#include <stdio.h>
int main(void)
{
    char  m[6];
    printf("please input a string with length=5\n");
    scanf("%s",&m);
    printf("this is the string: %s\n", m);
    return 0;
}

please input a string with lenght=5
hello
this is the string: hello

  • 2
    use pointer realloc combination – pinkpanther Jun 1 '13 at 10:00
  • You can drop the & in scanf("%s",&m) since m is already a pointer to the first element of m[] in this expression. – Jens Jun 1 '13 at 11:10
77

Enter while securing an area dynamically

E.G.

#include <stdio.h>
#include <stdlib.h>

char *inputString(FILE* fp, size_t size){
//The size is extended by the input with the value of the provisional
    char *str;
    int ch;
    size_t len = 0;
    str = realloc(NULL, sizeof(char)*size);//size is start size
    if(!str)return str;
    while(EOF!=(ch=fgetc(fp)) && ch != '\n'){
        str[len++]=ch;
        if(len==size){
            str = realloc(str, sizeof(char)*(size+=16));
            if(!str)return str;
        }
    }
    str[len++]='\0';

    return realloc(str, sizeof(char)*len);
}

int main(void){
    char *m;

    printf("input string : ");
    m = inputString(stdin, 10);
    printf("%s\n", m);

    free(m);
    return 0;
}
  • 10
    Multiplying by sizeof(char)? Ugh. – Jens Jun 1 '13 at 11:06
  • 6
    @Jens Pfff, that will probably be optimised away. No problems. But if you were to do a global find-and-replace of char with wchar_t, this solution would still work, unlike other solutions, that would need more tinkering! – Mr Lister Jun 1 '13 at 11:12
  • 7
    @MrLister Which is why the proper way, if at all, is to multiply with sizeof (*str) so you don't even have to edit the multiplication when the type changes. – Jens Jun 1 '13 at 12:11
  • 1
    @sh1 main() needs some error handling for when inputString() returns NULL. I leave it to him(her). – BLUEPIXY Jun 1 '13 at 12:28
  • 1
    (size *= 2) is better. – KIM Taegyoon Apr 9 '14 at 13:31
12

With the computers of today, you can get away with allocating very large strings (hundreds of thousands of characters) while hardly making a dent in the computer's RAM usage. So I wouldn't worry too much.

However, in the old days, when memory was at a premium, the common practice was to read strings in chunks. fgets reads up to a maximum number of chars from the input, but leaves the rest of the input buffer intact, so you can read the rest from it however you like.

in this example, I read in chunks of 200 chars, but you can use whatever chunk size you want of course.

#include <stdio.h>
#include <stdlib.h>
#include <string.h>

char* readinput()
{
#define CHUNK 200
   char* input = NULL;
   char tempbuf[CHUNK];
   size_t inputlen = 0, templen = 0;
   do {
       fgets(tempbuf, CHUNK, stdin);
       templen = strlen(tempbuf);
       inputlen += templen;
       input = realloc(input, inputlen+1);
       strcat(input, tempbuf);
    } while (templen==CHUNK-1 && tempbuf[CHUNK-2]!='\n');
    return input;
}

int main()
{
    char* result = readinput();
    printf("And the result is [%s]\n", result);
    free(result);
    return 0;
}

Note that this is a simplified example with no error checking; in real life you will have to make sure the input is OK by verifying the return value of fgets.

Also note that at the end if the readinput routine, no bytes are wasted; the string has the exact memory size it needs to have.

  • Needs error handling for realloc() returning NULL (and, consequently, for readinput() returning NULL). – sh1 Jun 1 '13 at 12:29
  • Need to check the return value of fgets(), else code may enter infinite loop. – chux Dec 6 '15 at 20:18
  • @chux OK, added a note about that. – Mr Lister Dec 6 '15 at 20:27
7

I've seen only one simple way of reading an arbitrarily long string, but I've never used it. I think it goes like this:

char *m = NULL;
printf("please input a string\n");
scanf("%ms",&m);
if (m == NULL)
    fprintf(stderr, "That string was too long!\n");
else
{
    printf("this is the string %s\n",m);
    /* ... any other use of m */
    free(m);
}

The m between % and s tells scanf() to measure the string and allocate memory for it and copy the string into that, and to store the address of that allocated memory in the corresponding argument. Once you're done with it you have to free() it.

This isn't supported on every implementation of scanf(), though.

As others have pointed out, the easiest solution is to set a limit on the length of the input. If you still want to use scanf() then you can do so this way:

char m[100];
scanf("%99s",&m);

Note that the size of m[] must be at least one byte larger than the number between % and s.

If the string entered is longer than 99, then the remaining characters will wait to be read by another call or by the rest of the format string passed to scanf().

Generally scanf() is not recommended for handling user input. It's best applied to basic structured text files that were created by another application. Even then, you must be aware that the input might not be formatted as you expect, as somebody might have interfered with it to try to break your program.

  • 1
    I also neglected to check for allocation failures originally. – sh1 Jun 1 '13 at 12:31
  • Note that "%ms" is not standard C --- it's probably either a POSIX extension or a GNU extension. – Tim Čas Feb 12 '15 at 21:36
  • 1
    @TimČas: It's part of Posix 2008, which is a standard. There was an earlier similar GNU extension and a similar BSD extension; the Posix standard is intended to unify the various implementations. It's quite possible that it will find its way into a future C standard. – rici Feb 12 '15 at 22:37
5

If I may suggest a safer approach:

Declare a buffer big enough to hold the string:

char user_input[255];

Get the user input in a safe way:

fgets(user_input, 255, stdin);

A safe way to get the input, the first argument being a pointer to a buffer where the input will be stored, the second the maximum input the function should read and the third is a pointer to the standard input - i.e. where the user input comes from.

Safety in particular comes from the second argument limiting how much will be read which prevents buffer overruns. Also, fgets takes care of null-terminating the processed string.

More info on that function here.

EDIT: If you need to do any formatting (e.g. convert a string to a number), you can use atoi once you have the input.

  • 2
    but the OP asking he doesn't know how much he is gonna input what if he randomly wants to input with > 255 – pinkpanther Jun 1 '13 at 10:01
  • 1
    IMO fgets(user_input, sizeof user_input, stdin); is safer. – chux Dec 6 '15 at 19:56
3

Safer and faster (doubling capacity) version:

char *readline(char *prompt) {
  size_t size = 80;
  char *str = malloc(sizeof(char) * size);
  int c;
  size_t len = 0;
  printf("%s", prompt);
  while (EOF != (c = getchar()) && c != '\r' && c != '\n') {
    str[len++] = c;
    if(len == size) str = realloc(str, sizeof(char) * (size *= 2));
  }
  str[len++]='\0';
  return realloc(str, sizeof(char) * len);
}
  • Usually the prompt is provided by the programmer. So you can not say it is unsafe. It can be unsafe if the programmer specifies some format specifier in the prompt. But I changed it. – KIM Taegyoon Jan 23 '17 at 23:01
  • Multiplying by sizeof (char) is redundant; sizeof (char) is 1 by definition. – melpomene Jan 23 '17 at 23:57
  • prompt should be a const char *. – melpomene Jan 23 '17 at 23:57
  • You should check all malloc and realloc calls for errors. – melpomene Jan 23 '17 at 23:58
  • The unchecked multiplication size *= 2 can overflow. – melpomene Jan 23 '17 at 23:58
1

Take a character pointer to store required string.If you have some idea about possible size of string then use function

char *fgets (char *str, int size, FILE* file);`

else you can allocate memory on runtime too using malloc() function which dynamically provides requested memory.

0

Read directly into allocated space with fgets().

Special care is need to distinguish a successful read, end-of-file, input error and out-of memory. Proper memory management needed on EOF.

This method retains a line's '\n'.

#include <stdio.h>
#include <stdlib.h>

#define FGETS_ALLOC_N 128

char* fgets_alloc(FILE *istream) {
  char* buf = NULL;
  size_t size = 0;
  size_t used = 0;
  do {
    size += FGETS_ALLOC_N;
    char *buf_new = realloc(buf, size);
    if (buf_new == NULL) {
      // Out-of-memory
      free(buf);
      return NULL;
    }
    buf = buf_new;
    if (fgets(&buf[used], (int) (size - used), istream) == NULL) {
      // feof or ferror
      if (used == 0 || ferror(istream)) {
        free(buf);
        buf = NULL;
      }
      return buf;
    }
    size_t length = strlen(&buf[used]);
    if (length + 1 != size - used) break;
    used += length;
  } while (buf[used - 1] != '\n');
  return buf;
}

Sample usage

int main(void) {
  FILE *istream = stdin;
  char *s;
  while ((s = fgets_alloc(istream)) != NULL) {
    printf("'%s'", s);
    free(s);
    fflush(stdout);
  }
  if (ferror(istream)) {
    puts("Input error");
  } else if (feof(istream)) {
    puts("End of file");
  } else {
    puts("Out of memory");
  }
  return 0;
}
  • error: invalid conversion from ‘void*’ to ‘char*’ [-fpermissive]==> char *buf_new = realloc(buf, size); – Hani Goc Mar 30 '16 at 9:24
  • @Hani Goc What compiler are you using? a C compiler or a C++ compiler? You comment is consistent with a C++ compiler using -fpermissive, but a complaint C compiler would not give that message and this post is tagged C. – chux Mar 30 '16 at 13:54
  • I am using a C++ compiler. Sorry I was a little confused. My mistake – Hani Goc Mar 30 '16 at 13:56
0

I know that I have arrived after 4 years and am too late but I think I have another way that someone can use. I had used getchar() Function like this:-

#include <stdio.h>
#include <stdlib.h>
#include <string.h>

//I had putten the main Function Bellow this function.
//d for asking string,f is pointer to the string pointer
void GetStr(char *d,char **f)
{
    printf("%s",d);

    for(int i =0;1;i++)
    {    
        if(i)//I.e if i!=0
            *f = (char*)realloc((*f),i+1);
        else
            *f = (char*)malloc(i+1);
        (*f)[i]=getchar();
        if((*f)[i] == '\n')
        {
            (*f)[i]= '\0';
            break;
        }
    }   
}

int main()
{
    char *s =NULL;
    GetStr("Enter the String:- ",&s);
    printf("Your String:- %s \nAnd It's length:- %lu\n",s,(strlen(s)));
    free(s);
}

here is the sample run for this program:-

Enter the String:- I am Using Linux Mint XFCE 18.2 , eclispe CDT and GCC7.2 compiler!!
Your String:- I am Using Linux Mint XFCE 18.2 , eclispe CDT and GCC7.2 compiler!! 
And It's length:- 67
0

i also have a solution with standard inputs and outputs

#include<stdio.h>
#include<malloc.h>
int main()
{
    char *str,ch;
    int size=10,len=0;
    str=realloc(NULL,sizeof(char)*size);
    if(!str)return str;
    while(EOF!=scanf("%c",&ch) && ch!="\n")
    {
        str[len++]=ch;
        if(len==size)
        {
            str = realloc(str,sizeof(char)*(size+=10));
            if(!str)return str;
        }
    }
    str[len++]='\0';
    printf("%s\n",str);
    free(str);
}

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