35

For example if the parenthesis/brackets is matching in the following:

({})
(()){}()
()

and so on but if the parenthesis/brackets is not matching it should return false, eg:

{}
({}(
){})
(()

and so on. Can you please check this code? Thanks in advance.

public static boolean isParenthesisMatch(String str) {
    Stack<Character> stack = new Stack<Character>();

    char c;
    for(int i=0; i < str.length(); i++) {
        c = str.charAt(i);

        if(c == '{')
            return false;

        if(c == '(')
            stack.push(c);

        if(c == '{') {
            stack.push(c);
            if(c == '}')
                if(stack.empty())
                    return false;
                else if(stack.peek() == '{')
                    stack.pop();
        }
        else if(c == ')')
            if(stack.empty())
                return false;
            else if(stack.peek() == '(')
                    stack.pop();
                else
                    return false;
        }
        return stack.empty();
}

public static void main(String[] args) {        
    String str = "({})";
    System.out.println(Weekly12.parenthesisOtherMatching(str)); 
}
20
  • You say "parens" but you also seem to want to check brackets... – fge Jun 1 '13 at 15:18
  • 1
    what's so special about java here? – SMA Apr 1 '15 at 16:54
  • 10
    Question. Is [ { ] } a valid matching? – Kevin Apr 1 '15 at 17:07
  • 3
    Without a language specification (i.e. a precise answer to the question "according to which rules are the expressions you want to parse being formed") we can't answer this. Are they a context free language? They definitely aren't regular due to the parentheses alone. Are they context-sensitive? Turing-complete? Regardless of all that, this question should be on CS.SE – G. Bach Apr 1 '15 at 17:45
  • 2
    Or you could write a real parser instead of abusing regex. – All Workers Are Essential Apr 2 '15 at 19:12

30 Answers 30

54

Your code has some confusion in its handling of the '{' and '}' characters. It should be entirely parallel to how you handle '(' and ')'.

This code, modified slightly from yours, seems to work properly:

public static boolean isParenthesisMatch(String str) {
    if (str.charAt(0) == '{')
        return false;

    Stack<Character> stack = new Stack<Character>();

    char c;
    for(int i=0; i < str.length(); i++) {
        c = str.charAt(i);

        if(c == '(')
            stack.push(c);
        else if(c == '{')
            stack.push(c);
        else if(c == ')')
            if(stack.empty())
                return false;
            else if(stack.peek() == '(')
                stack.pop();
            else
                return false;
        else if(c == '}')
            if(stack.empty())
                return false;
            else if(stack.peek() == '{')
                stack.pop();
            else
                return false;
    }
    return stack.empty();
}
2
  • thanks but the problem is {, {} or even {()}, {}() it should return false. In other words, the first c == { should be false. – Shuvo0o Jun 1 '13 at 15:56
  • Would it work for a whole file or only for a single line? Suppose ( is in 1st line but ) is in 2nd line of a file. Is it possible to check in this case? – Sigur Jun 7 '18 at 21:42
48

This code is easier to understand:

public static boolean CheckParentesis(String str)
{
    if (str.isEmpty())
        return true;

    Stack<Character> stack = new Stack<Character>();
    for (int i = 0; i < str.length(); i++)
    {
        char current = str.charAt(i);
        if (current == '{' || current == '(' || current == '[')
        {
            stack.push(current);
        }


        if (current == '}' || current == ')' || current == ']')
        {
            if (stack.isEmpty())
                return false;

            char last = stack.peek();
            if (current == '}' && last == '{' || current == ')' && last == '(' || current == ']' && last == '[')
                stack.pop();
            else 
                return false;
        }

    }

    return stack.isEmpty();
}
1
  • 2
    Great code, though it could be slightly improved upon by adding a continue statement after pushing the current character onto the stack. – JSextonn Aug 12 '18 at 7:09
10
public static boolean isValidExpression(String expression) {
    Map<Character, Character> openClosePair = new HashMap<Character, Character>();
    openClosePair.put(')', '(');
    openClosePair.put('}', '{');
    openClosePair.put(']', '[');        
    Stack<Character> stack = new Stack<Character>();
    for(char ch : expression.toCharArray()) {
        if(openClosePair.containsKey(ch)) {
            if(stack.pop() != openClosePair.get(ch)) {
                return false;
            }
        } else if(openClosePair.values().contains(ch)) {
            stack.push(ch); 
        }
    }
    return stack.isEmpty();
}
6
  • 1
    Why should OP use your code? Could you expand your answer with an explanation? – Zippy Mar 29 '16 at 12:33
  • It returns the result immediately after found a illegal close. Uses Map which intern uses hashing technique and faster. Number of lines are less and easy to understand. – ganesan dharmalingam May 12 '16 at 7:39
  • openClosePair.values().contains(ch) be replaced openClosePair.containsValue(ch) – Tim Jan 7 '17 at 23:14
  • your last pair is backwards change to (']','[') – JesseBoyd Apr 5 '18 at 21:24
  • and you need to check if the stack is empty if(stack.empty() || stack.pop() != openClosedPair.get(ch)) { return false; } – JesseBoyd Apr 5 '18 at 21:44
6

The algorithm:

  1. scan the string,pushing to a stack for every '(' found in the string
  2. if char ')' scanned, pop one '(' from the stack

Now, parentheses are balanced for two conditions:

  • '(' can be popped from the stack for every ')' found in the string, and
  • stack is empty at the end (when the entire string is processed)
1
  • Even if I add '{' and '}' conditions to this algorithm, it doesn't apply to - {(}). We must check if after every LAST bracket/parenthesis that opens, the SAME must close. – Swanidhi Oct 15 '15 at 6:26
4

Actually, there is no need to check any cases "manually". You can just run the following algorithm:

  1. Iterate over the given sequence. Start with an empty stack.

  2. If the current char is an opening bracket, just push it to the stack.

  3. If it's a closing bracket, check that the stack is not empty and the top element of the step is an appropriate opening bracket(that it is, matches this one). If it is not, report an error. Otherwise, pop the top element from the stack.

  4. In the end, the sequence is correct iff the stack is empty.

Why is it correct? Here is a sketch of a proof: if this algorithm reported that the sequence is corrected, it had found a matching pair of all brackets. Thus, the sequence is indeed correct by definition. If it has reported an error:

  1. If the stack was not empty in the end, the balance of opening and closing brackets is not zero. Thus, it is not a correct sequence.

  2. If the stack was empty when we had to pop an element, the balance is off again.

  3. If there was a wrong element on top of the stack, a pair of "wrong" brackets should match each other. It means that the sequence is not correct.

I have shown that:

  • If the algorithm has reported that the sequence is correct, it is correct.

  • If the algorithm has reported that the sequence is not correct, it is incorrect(note that I do not use the fact that there are no other cases except those that are mentioned in your question).

This two points imply that this algorithm works for all possible inputs.

3
3
public static boolean isBalanced(String s) {
    Map<Character, Character> openClosePair = new HashMap<Character, Character>();
    openClosePair.put('(', ')');
    openClosePair.put('{', '}');
    openClosePair.put('[', ']'); 

    Stack<Character> stack = new Stack<Character>();
    for (int i = 0; i < s.length(); i++) {

        if (openClosePair.containsKey(s.charAt(i))) {
            stack.push(s.charAt(i));

        } else if ( openClosePair.containsValue(s.charAt(i))) {
            if (stack.isEmpty())
                return false;
            if (openClosePair.get(stack.pop()) != s.charAt(i))
                return false;
        }

        // ignore all other characters

    }
    return stack.isEmpty();
}
0
2

Ganesan's answer above is not correct and StackOverflow is not letting me comment or Edit his post. So below is the correct answer. Ganesan has an incorrect facing "[" and is missing the stack isEmpty() check.

The below code will return true if the braces are properly matching.

public static boolean isValidExpression(String expression) {
    Map<Character, Character> openClosePair = new HashMap<Character, Character>();
    openClosePair.put(')', '(');
    openClosePair.put('}', '{');
    openClosePair.put(']', '[');

    Stack<Character> stack = new Stack<Character>();
    for(char ch : expression.toCharArray()) {
        if(openClosePair.containsKey(ch)) {
            if(stack.isEmpty() || stack.pop() != openClosePair.get(ch)) {
                return false;
            }
        } else if(openClosePair.values().contains(ch)) {
            stack.push(ch); 
        }
    }
    return stack.isEmpty();
}
2
public boolean isValid(String s) {
    Map<Character, Character> map = new HashMap<>();
    map.put('(', ')');
    map.put('[', ']');
    map.put('{', '}');
    Stack<Character> stack = new Stack<>();
    for(char c : s.toCharArray()){
        if(map.containsKey(c)){
            stack.push(c);
        } else if(!stack.empty() && map.get(stack.peek())==c){
            stack.pop();
        } else {
            return false;
        }
    }
    return stack.empty();
}
1

Algorithm is:

1)Create a stack

2)while(end of input is not reached)

   i)if the character read is not a sysmbol to be balanced ,ignore it.

   ii)if the character is {,[,( then push it to stack

   iii)If it is a },),] then if 

        a)the stack is empty report an error(catch it) i.e not balanced

        b)else pop the stack 

   iv)if element popped is not corresponding to opening sysmbol,then report error.

3) In the end,if stack is not empty report error else expression is balanced.  

In Java code:

public class StackDemo {
    public static void main(String[] args) throws Exception {
        System.out.println("--Bracket checker--");
        CharStackArray stack = new CharStackArray(10);
        stack.balanceSymbol("[a+b{c+(e-f[p-q])}]") ;
        stack.display();

    }

}    

class CharStackArray {
        private char[] array;
        private int top;
        private int capacity;

        public CharStackArray(int cap) {
            capacity = cap;
            array = new char[capacity];
            top = -1;
        }

        public void push(char data) {
            array[++top] = data;
        }

        public char pop() {
            return array[top--];
        }

        public void display() {
            for (int i = 0; i <= top; i++) {
                System.out.print(array[i] + "->");
            }
        }

        public char peek() throws Exception {
            return array[top];
        }

        /*Call this method by passing a string expression*/
        public void balanceSymbol(String str) {
            try {
                char[] arr = str.toCharArray();
                for (int i = 0; i < arr.length; i++) {
                    if (arr[i] == '[' || arr[i] == '{' || arr[i] == '(')
                        push(arr[i]);
                    else if (arr[i] == '}' && peek() == '{')
                        pop();
                    else if (arr[i] == ']' && peek() == '[')
                        pop();
                    else if (arr[i] == ')' && peek() == '(')
                        pop();
                }
                if (isEmpty()) {
                    System.out.println("String is balanced");
                } else {
                    System.out.println("String is not balanced");
                }
            } catch (Exception e) {
                System.out.println("String not balanced");
            }

        }

        public boolean isEmpty() {
            return (top == -1);
        }
    }

Output:

--Bracket checker--

String is balanced

1

Optimized implementation using Stacks and Switch statement:

public class JavaStack {

public static void main(String[] args) {
    Scanner sc = new Scanner(System.in);

      Stack<Character> s = new Stack<Character>();

    while (sc.hasNext()) {
        String input = sc.next();

        for (int i = 0; i < input.length(); i++) {
            char c = input.charAt(i);
            switch (c) {

                case '(':
                    s.push(c); break;
                case '[':
                    s.push(c); break;
                case '{':
                    s.push(c); break;
                case ')':
                    if (!s.isEmpty() && s.peek().equals('(')) {
                        s.pop();
                    } else {
                        s.push(c);
                    } break;
                case ']':
                    if (!s.isEmpty() && s.peek().equals('[')) {
                        s.pop();
                    } else {
                        s.push(c);
                    } break;
                case '}':
                    if (!s.isEmpty() && s.peek().equals('{')) {
                        s.pop();
                    } else {
                        s.push(c);
                    } break;

                default:
                    s.push('x'); break;

            }

        }
        if (s.empty()) {
            System.out.println("true");
        } else {
            System.out.println("false");
            s.clear();
        }
    }
} }

Cheers !

1

You're doing some extra checks that aren't needed. Doesn't make any diff to functionality, but a cleaner way to write your code would be:

public static boolean isParenthesisMatch(String str) {
    Stack<Character> stack = new Stack<Character>();
    char c;

    for (int i = 0; i < str.length(); i++) {
        c = str.charAt(i);
        if (c == '(' || c == '{')
            stack.push(c);
        else if (stack.empty())
            return false;
        else if (c == ')') {
            if (stack.pop() != '(')
                return false;
        } else if (c == '}') {
            if (stack.pop() != '{')
                return false;
        }
    }
    return stack.empty();
}

There is no reason to peek at a paranthesis before removing it from the stack. I'd also consider wrapping instruction blocks in parantheses to improve readability.

0
import java.util.*;

class StackDemo {

    public static void main(String[] argh) {
        boolean flag = true;
        String str = "(()){}()";
        int l = str.length();
        flag = true;
        Stack<String> st = new Stack<String>();
        for (int i = 0; i < l; i++) {
            String test = str.substring(i, i + 1);
            if (test.equals("(")) {
                st.push(test);
            } else if (test.equals("{")) {
                st.push(test);
            } else if (test.equals("[")) {
                st.push(test);
            } else if (test.equals(")")) {
                if (st.empty()) {
                    flag = false;
                    break;
                }
                if (st.peek().equals("(")) {
                    st.pop();
                } else {
                    flag = false;
                    break;
                }
            } else if (test.equals("}")) {
                if (st.empty()) {
                    flag = false;
                    break;
                }
                if (st.peek().equals("{")) {
                    st.pop();
                } else {
                    flag = false;
                    break;
                }
            } else if (test.equals("]")) {
                if (st.empty()) {
                    flag = false;
                    break;
                }
                if (st.peek().equals("[")) {
                    st.pop();
                } else {
                    flag = false;
                    break;
                }
            }
        }
        if (flag && st.empty())
            System.out.println("true");
        else
            System.out.println("false");
    }
}
1
  • 1
    While this code snippet may solve the question, including an explanation really helps to improve the quality of your post. Remember that you are answering the question for readers in the future, and those people might not know the reasons for your code suggestion. – Tony Babarino Jun 23 '16 at 20:31
0

I have seen answers here and almost all did well. However, I have written my own version that utilizes a Dictionary for managing the bracket pairs and a stack to monitor the order of detected braces. I have also written a blog post for this.

Here is my class

public class FormulaValidator
{
    // Question: Check if a string is balanced. Every opening bracket is matched by a closing bracket in a correct position.
    // { [ ( } ] )

    // Example: "()" is balanced
    // Example: "{ ]" is not balanced.
    // Examples: "()[]{}" is balanced.
    // "{([])}" is balanced
    // "{ ( [ ) ] }" is _not_ balanced

    // Input: string, containing the bracket symbols only
    // Output: true or false
    public bool IsBalanced(string input)
    {
        var brackets = BuildBracketMap();
        var openingBraces = new Stack<char>();
        var inputCharacters = input.ToCharArray();

        foreach (char character in inputCharacters)
        {
            if (brackets.ContainsKey(character))
            {
                openingBraces.Push(character);
            }

            if (brackets.ContainsValue(character))
            {
                var closingBracket = character;
                var openingBracket = brackets.FirstOrDefault(x => x.Value == closingBracket).Key;

                if (openingBraces.Peek() == openingBracket)
                    openingBraces.Pop();
                else
                    return false;
            }
        }

        return openingBraces.Count == 0;
    }

    private Dictionary<char, char> BuildBracketMap()
    {
        return new Dictionary<char, char>()
        {
            {'[', ']'},
            {'(', ')'},
            {'{', '}'}
        };
    }
}
0

Algorithm to use for checking well balanced parenthesis -

  1. Declare a map matchingParenMap and initialize it with closing and opening bracket of each type as the key-value pair respectively.
  2. Declare a set openingParenSet and initialize it with the values of matchingParenMap.
  3. Declare a stack parenStack which will store the opening brackets '{', '(', and '['.
  4. Now traverse the string expression input.

    1. If the current character is an opening bracket ( '{', '(', '[' ) then push it to the parenStack.

    2. If the current character is a closing bracket ( '}', ')', ']' ) then pop from parenStack and if the popped character is equal to the matching starting bracket in matchingParenMap then continue looping else return false.

  5. After complete traversal if no opening brackets are left in parenStack it means it is a well balanced expression.

I have explained the code snippet of the algorithm used on my blog. Check link - http://hetalrachh.home.blog/2019/12/25/stack-data-structure/

0

Problem Statement: Check for balanced parentheses in an expression Or Match for Open Closing Brackets

If you appeared for coding interview round then you might have encountered this problem before. This is a pretty common question and can be solved by using Stack Data Structure Solution in C#

        public void OpenClosingBracketsMatch()
        {
            string pattern = "{[(((((}}])";
            Dictionary<char, char> matchLookup = new Dictionary<char, char>();
            matchLookup['{'] = '}';
            matchLookup['('] = ')';
            matchLookup['['] = ']';
            Stack<char> stck = new Stack<char>();
            for (int i = 0; i < pattern.Length; i++)
            {
                char currentChar = pattern[i];
                if (matchLookup.ContainsKey(currentChar))
                    stck.Push(currentChar);
                else if (currentChar == '}' || currentChar == ')' || currentChar == ']')
                {
                    char topCharFromStack = stck.Peek();
                    if (matchLookup[topCharFromStack] != currentChar)
                    {
                        Console.WriteLine("NOT Matched");
                        return;
                    }
                }
            }

            Console.WriteLine("Matched");
        }

For more information, you may also refer to this link: https://www.geeksforgeeks.org/check-for-balanced-parentheses-in-an-expression/

2
  • 1
    Hello! While this code may solve the question, including an explanation of how and why this solves the problem would really help to improve the quality of your post, and probably result in more up-votes. Remember that you are answering the question for readers in the future, not just the person asking now. Please edit your answer to add explanations and give an indication of what limitations and assumptions apply. – Brian Apr 21 '20 at 0:38
  • Thanks @Brian for pointing this out! I've added more description to my post – Dheeraj Bansal Aug 27 '20 at 8:54
0

here is my solution using c++ if brackets are matched then returns true if not then gives false enter image description here

#include <iostream>
#include <stack>
#include <string.h>
using namespace std;

int matchbracket(string expr){
    stack<char> st;
    int i;
    char x;
    for(i=0;i<expr.length();i++){
        if(expr[i]=='('||expr[i]=='{'||expr[i]=='[')
          st.push(expr[i]);
          
        if(st.empty())
         return -1;
        switch(expr[i]){
            case ')' :
             x=expr[i];
             st.pop();
             if(x=='}'||x==']')
              return 0;
              break;
            
            case '}' :
             x=expr[i];
             st.pop();
             if(x==')'||x==']')
              return 0;
              break;
        
            case ']' :
            x=expr[i];
            st.pop();
            if(x==')'||x=='}')
             return 1;
             break;
        } 

    }
    return(st.empty());
}

int main()
{
 string expr;
 cin>>expr;
 
 if(matchbracket(expr)==1)
  cout<<"\nTRUE\n";
  else
  cout<<"\nFALSE\n";
}
-1
//basic code non strack algorithm just started learning java ignore space and time.
/// {[()]}[][]{}
// {[( -a -> }]) -b -> replace a(]}) -> reverse a( }]))-> 
//Split string to substring {[()]}, next [], next [], next{}

public class testbrackets {
    static String stringfirst;
    static String stringsecond;
    static int open = 0;
    public static void main(String[] args) {
        splitstring("(()){}()");
    }
static void splitstring(String str){

    int len = str.length();
    for(int i=0;i<=len-1;i++){
        stringfirst="";
        stringsecond="";
        System.out.println("loop starttttttt");
        char a = str.charAt(i);
    if(a=='{'||a=='['||a=='(')
    {
        open = open+1;
        continue;
    }
    if(a=='}'||a==']'||a==')'){
        if(open==0){
            System.out.println(open+"started with closing brace");
            return;
        }
        String stringfirst=str.substring(i-open, i);
        System.out.println("stringfirst"+stringfirst);
        String stringsecond=str.substring(i, i+open);
        System.out.println("stringsecond"+stringsecond);
        replace(stringfirst, stringsecond);

        }
    i=(i+open)-1;
    open=0;
    System.out.println(i);
    }
    }
    static void replace(String stringfirst, String stringsecond){
        stringfirst = stringfirst.replace('{', '}');
        stringfirst = stringfirst.replace('(', ')');
        stringfirst = stringfirst.replace('[', ']');
        StringBuilder stringfirst1 = new StringBuilder(stringfirst);
        stringfirst = stringfirst1.reverse().toString();
    System.out.println("stringfirst"+stringfirst);
    System.out.println("stringsecond"+stringsecond);
if(stringfirst.equals(stringsecond)){
    System.out.println("pass");
}
    else{
        System.out.println("fail");
        System.exit(0);
        }
    }
}
2
  • This is quite different to the code posted by the OP. It would be very helpful to others if you could explain it a bit so we can see what your train of thought was. – Wai Ha Lee Apr 19 '15 at 18:00
  • Plus it's way too long. you should also refrain as much as possible from printing from within methods. – Amos Bordowitz Sep 16 '15 at 10:14
-1
import java.util.Stack;

class Demo
{

    char c;

    public  boolean checkParan(String word)
    {
        Stack<Character> sta = new Stack<Character>();
        for(int i=0;i<word.length();i++)
        {
           c=word.charAt(i);


          if(c=='(')
          {
              sta.push(c);
              System.out.println("( Pushed into the stack");

          }
          else if(c=='{')
          {
              sta.push(c);
              System.out.println("( Pushed into the stack");
          }
          else if(c==')')
          {
              if(sta.empty())
              {
                  System.out.println("Stack is Empty");
                  return false;
              }
              else if(sta.peek()=='(')
              {

                  sta.pop();
                  System.out.println(" ) is poped from the Stack");
              }
              else if(sta.peek()=='(' && sta.empty())
              {
                  System.out.println("Stack is Empty");
                  return false;
              }
          }
          else if(c=='}')
          {
              if(sta.empty())
              {
               System.out.println("Stack is Empty");
              return false;
              }
              else if(sta.peek()=='{')
              {
                  sta.pop();
                  System.out.println(" } is poped from the Stack");
              }

          }

          else if(c=='(')
          {
              if(sta.empty())
              {
                 System.out.println("Stack is empty only ( parenthesis in Stack ");  
              }
          }


        }
    // System.out.print("The top element is : "+sta.peek());
    return sta.empty();
    } 





}

public class ParaenthesisChehck {

    /**
     * @param args the command line arguments
     */
    public static void main(String[] args) {
        // TODO code application logic here
       Demo d1= new Demo();
     //  d1.checkParan(" ");
      // d1.checkParan("{}");
       //d1.checkParan("()");
       //d1.checkParan("{()}");
     // d1.checkParan("{123}");
       d1.checkParan("{{{}}");





    }

}
-1
import java.util.*;

public class Parenthesis

 {

    public static void main(String...okok)

    {
        Scanner sc= new Scanner(System.in);
        String str=sc.next();
        System.out.println(isValid(str));

    }
    public static int isValid(String a) {
        if(a.length()%2!=0)
        {

            return 0;
        }
        else if(a.length()==0)
        {

            return 1;
        }
        else
        {

            char c[]=a.toCharArray();
            Stack<Character> stk =  new Stack<Character>();
            for(int i=0;i<c.length;i++)
            {
                if(c[i]=='(' || c[i]=='[' || c[i]=='{')
                {
                    stk.push(c[i]);
                }
                else
                {
                    if(stk.isEmpty())
                    {
                        return 0;
                        //break;
                    }
                    else
                    {

                        char cc=c[i];
                        if(cc==')' && stk.peek()=='(' )
                        {
                            stk.pop();
                        }
                        else if(cc==']' && stk.peek()=='[' )
                        {

                            stk.pop();
                        }
                        else if(cc=='}' && stk.peek()=='{' )
                        {

                            stk.pop();
                        }
                    }
                }

            }
            if(stk.isEmpty())
            {
                return 1;
            }else
            {
                return 0;
            }
        }



    }

}
-1

I tried this using javascript below is the result.

function bracesChecker(str) {
  if(!str) {
    return true;
  }
  var openingBraces = ['{', '[', '('];
  var closingBraces = ['}', ']', ')'];
  var stack = [];
  var openIndex;
  var closeIndex;
  //check for opening Braces in the val
  for (var i = 0, len = str.length; i < len; i++) {
    openIndex = openingBraces.indexOf(str[i]);
    closeIndex = closingBraces.indexOf(str[i]);
    if(openIndex !== -1) {
      stack.push(str[i]);
    }  
    if(closeIndex !== -1) {
      if(openingBraces[closeIndex] === stack[stack.length-1]) { 
        stack.pop();
      } else {
        return false;
      }
    }
  }
  if(stack.length === 0) {
    return true;
  } else {
    return false;
  }
}
var testStrings = [
  '', 
  'test', 
  '{{[][]()()}()}[]()', 
  '{test{[test]}}', 
  '{test{[test]}', 
  '{test{(yo)[test]}}', 
  'test{[test]}}', 
  'te()s[]t{[test]}', 
  'te()s[]t{[test'
];

testStrings.forEach(val => console.log(`${val} => ${bracesChecker(val)}`));
-1
import java.util.*;

public class MatchBrackets {

    public static void main(String[] argh) {
        String input = "[]{[]()}";
        System.out.println  (input);

        char [] openChars =  {'[','{','('};
        char [] closeChars = {']','}',')'};

        Stack<Character> stack = new Stack<Character>();

        for (int i = 0; i < input.length(); i++) {

            String x = "" +input.charAt(i);

            if (String.valueOf(openChars).indexOf(x) != -1)
            {
                stack.push(input.charAt(i));
            }
            else
            {
                Character lastOpener = stack.peek();
                int idx1 = String.valueOf(openChars).indexOf(lastOpener.toString());
                int idx2 = String.valueOf(closeChars).indexOf(x);

                if (idx1 != idx2)
                {
                    System.out.println("false");
                    return;
                }
                else
                {
                    stack.pop();
                }
            }
        }

        if (stack.size() == 0)
            System.out.println("true");
        else
            System.out.println("false");
    }
}
-1

If you want to have a look at my code. Just for reference

public class Default {

    public static void main(String[] args) throws IOException {

        BufferedReader br = new BufferedReader(new InputStreamReader(System.in));
        int numOfString = Integer.parseInt(br.readLine());
        String s;
        String stringBalanced = "YES";
        Stack<Character> exprStack = new Stack<Character>();

        while ((s = br.readLine()) != null) {
            stringBalanced = "YES";
            int length = s.length() - 1;
            for (int i = 0; i <= length; i++) {
                char tmp = s.charAt(i);

                if(tmp=='[' || tmp=='{' || tmp=='('){
                    exprStack.push(tmp);
                }else if(tmp==']' || tmp=='}' || tmp==')'){
                    if(!exprStack.isEmpty()){
                        char peekElement = exprStack.peek();
                        exprStack.pop();
                        if(tmp==']' && peekElement!='['){
                            stringBalanced="NO";
                        }else if(tmp=='}' && peekElement!='{'){
                            stringBalanced="NO";
                        }else if(tmp==')' && peekElement!='('){
                            stringBalanced="NO";
                        }
                    }else{
                        stringBalanced="NO";
                        break;
                    }
                }

            }

            if(!exprStack.isEmpty()){
                stringBalanced = "NO";
            }

            exprStack.clear();
            System.out.println(stringBalanced);
        }
    }
}
-1
public static bool IsBalanced(string input)
    {
        Dictionary<char, char> bracketPairs = new Dictionary<char, char>() {
        { '(', ')' },
        { '{', '}' },
        { '[', ']' },
        { '<', '>' }
    };

        Stack<char> brackets = new Stack<char>();

        try
        {
            // Iterate through each character in the input string
            foreach (char c in input)
            {
                // check if the character is one of the 'opening' brackets
                if (bracketPairs.Keys.Contains(c))
                {
                    // if yes, push to stack
                    brackets.Push(c);
                }
                else
                    // check if the character is one of the 'closing' brackets
                    if (bracketPairs.Values.Contains(c))
                    {
                        // check if the closing bracket matches the 'latest' 'opening' bracket
                        if (c == bracketPairs[brackets.First()])
                        {
                            brackets.Pop();
                        }
                        else
                            // if not, its an unbalanced string
                            return false;
                    }
                    else
                        // continue looking
                        continue;
            }
        }
        catch
        {
            // an exception will be caught in case a closing bracket is found, 
            // before any opening bracket.
            // that implies, the string is not balanced. Return false
            return false;
        }

        // Ensure all brackets are closed
        return brackets.Count() == 0 ? true : false;
    }
-1
public String checkString(String value) {
    Stack<Character> stack = new Stack<>();
    char topStackChar = 0;
    for (int i = 0; i < value.length(); i++) {
        if (!stack.isEmpty()) {
            topStackChar = stack.peek();
        }
        stack.push(value.charAt(i));
        if (!stack.isEmpty() && stack.size() > 1) {
            if ((topStackChar == '[' && stack.peek() == ']') ||
                    (topStackChar == '{' && stack.peek() == '}') ||
                    (topStackChar == '(' && stack.peek() == ')')) {
                stack.pop();
                stack.pop();
            }
        }
    }
    return stack.isEmpty() ? "YES" : "NO";
}
-1

Here's a solution in Python.

#!/usr/bin/env python

def brackets_match(brackets):
    stack = []
    for char in brackets:
        if char == "{" or char == "(" or char == "[":
            stack.append(char)
        if char == "}":
            if stack[-1] == "{":
                stack.pop()
            else:
                return False
        elif char == "]":
            if stack[-1] == "[":
                stack.pop()
            else:
                return False
        elif char == ")":
            if stack[-1] == "(":
                stack.pop()
            else:
                return False
    if len(stack) == 0:
        return True
    else:
        return False

if __name__ == "__main__":
    print(brackets_match("This is testing {([])} if brackets have match."))
-1

Was asked to implement this algorithm at live coding interview, here's my refactored solution in C#:

Git Tests

-1
package com.balance.braces;

import java.util.Arrays;
import java.util.Stack;

public class BalanceBraces {

public static void main(String[] args) {

    String[] values = { "()]", "[()]" };

    String[] rsult = match(values);

    Arrays.stream(rsult).forEach(str -> System.out.println(str));
}

static String[] match(String[] values) {

    String[] returnString = new String[values.length];

    for (int i = 0; i < values.length; i++) {
        String value = values[i];

        if (value.length() % 2 != 0) {
            returnString[i] = "NO";
            continue;
        } else {

            Stack<Character> buffer = new Stack<Character>();
            for (char ch : value.toCharArray()) {

                if (buffer.isEmpty()) {
                    buffer.add(ch);
                } else {
                    if (isMatchedBrace(buffer.peek(), ch)) {
                        buffer.pop();
                    } else {
                        buffer.push(ch);
                    }
                }
                if (buffer.isEmpty()) {
                    returnString[i] = "YES";
                } else {
                    returnString[i] = "FALSE";
                }
            }
        }

    }

    return returnString;
}

static boolean isMatchedBrace(char start, char endmatch) {
    if (start == '{')
        return endmatch == '}';
    if (start == '(')
        return endmatch == ')';
    if (start == '[')
        return endmatch == ']';
    return false;
}

}
-1

in java you don't want to compare the string or char by == signs. you would use equals method. equalsIgnoreCase or something of the like. if you use == it must point to the same memory location. In the method below I attempted to use ints to get around this. using ints here from the string index since every opening brace has a closing brace. I wanted to use location match instead of a comparison match. But i think with this you have to be intentional in where you place the characters of the string. Lets also consider that Yes = true and No = false for simplicity. This answer assumes that you passed an array of strings to inspect and required an array of if yes (they matched) or No (they didn't)

import java.util.Stack; 

    public static void main(String[] args) {

    //String[] arrayOfBraces = new String[]{"{[]}","([{}])","{}{()}","{}","}]{}","{[)]()}"};
    // Example: "()" is balanced
    // Example: "{ ]" is not balanced.
    // Examples: "()[]{}" is balanced.
    // "{([])}" is balanced
    // "{([)]}" is _not_ balanced

    String[] arrayOfBraces  = new String[]{"{[]}","([{}])","{}{()}","()[]{}","}]{}","{[)]()}","{[)]()}","{([)]}"};
    String[] answers        = new String[arrayOfBraces.length];     
    String openers          = "([{";
    String closers          = ")]}";
    String stringToInspect  = ""; 
    Stack<String> stack     = new Stack<String>();


    for (int i = 0; i < arrayOfBraces.length; i++) {

        stringToInspect = arrayOfBraces[i];
        for (int j = 0; j < stringToInspect.length(); j++) {            
            if(stack.isEmpty()){
                if (openers.indexOf(stringToInspect.charAt(j))>=0) {
                    stack.push(""+stringToInspect.charAt(j));   
                }
                else{
                    answers[i]= "NO";
                    j=stringToInspect.length();
                }                   
            }
            else if(openers.indexOf(stringToInspect.charAt(j))>=0){
                stack.push(""+stringToInspect.charAt(j));   
            }
            else{
                String comparator = stack.pop();
                int compLoc = openers.indexOf(comparator);
                int thisLoc = closers.indexOf(stringToInspect.charAt(j));

                if (compLoc != thisLoc) {
                    answers[i]= "NO";
                    j=stringToInspect.length();                     
                }
                else{
                    if(stack.empty() && (j== stringToInspect.length()-1)){
                        answers[i]= "YES";
                    }
                }
            }
        }
    }

    System.out.println(answers.length);         
    for (int j = 0; j < answers.length; j++) {
        System.out.println(answers[j]);
    }       
}
-1
  Check balanced parenthesis or brackets with stack-- 
  var excp = "{{()}[{a+b+b}][{(c+d){}}][]}";
   var stk = [];   
   function bracket_balance(){
      for(var i=0;i<excp.length;i++){
          if(excp[i]=='[' || excp[i]=='(' || excp[i]=='{'){
             stk.push(excp[i]);
          }else if(excp[i]== ']' && stk.pop() != '['){
             return false;
          }else if(excp[i]== '}' && stk.pop() != '{'){

            return false;
          }else if(excp[i]== ')' && stk.pop() != '('){

            return false;
          }
      }

      return true;
   }

  console.log(bracket_balance());
  //Parenthesis are balance then return true else false
-2

Brackets Matching program without using stack

Here i used string for replacement of stack implementations like push and pop operations.

`package java_prac; import java.util.*; public class BracketsChecker {

    public static void main(String[] args) {
        System.out.println("- - - Brackets Checker [ without stack ] - - -\n\n");
        Scanner scan=new Scanner(System.in);
        System.out.print("Input : " );
        String s = scan.nextLine();
        scan.close();
        System.out.println("\n...working...\n");
        String o="([{";
        String c=")]}";
        String x=" ";
        int check =0;
        for (int i = 0; i < s.length(); i++) {
            if(o.contains(String.valueOf(s.charAt(i)))){
                x+=s.charAt(i);     
                 //System.out.println("In : "+x); // stack in
            }else if(c.contains(String.valueOf(s.charAt(i)))) { 
                char temp = s.charAt(i);
                if(temp==')') temp = '(';
                if(temp=='}') temp = '{';
                if(temp==']') temp = '[';
                if(x.charAt(x.length()-1)==temp) {
                    x=" "+x.substring(1,x.length()-1);
                    //System.out.println("Out : "+x);   // stack out
            }else {
            check=1;    
            }
            }
    }   
        if(x.length()==1 && check==0 ) {
            System.out.println("\n\nCompilation Success \n\n© github.com/sharanstark 2k19");
        }else {
            System.out.println("\n\nCompilation Error \n\n© github.com/sharanstark 2k19" );
        }
    }
}`
2
  • 1
    Please put your answer always in context instead of just pasting code. See here for more details. – gehbiszumeis Jun 12 '19 at 7:18
  • 3
    Please don't only post code as an answer, but include an explanation what your code does, and how it solves the problem. – Mark Rotteveel Jun 12 '19 at 7:36

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