2

I have a list of type Person. When I create the list of people it replaces the previous list element's information with the current one. I have read about this being the problem with static class variables but none of my attributes are static.

class Person{
private string _name;
private string _address;

public string Name{
get{ return _name;}
set { _name = value;}

public string Address{
get{ return _address;}
set { _address = value;}
}
}

I read in the people from a file and store it in a array of string. I stepped through to make sure the array is correct. It is.

Here is where it gets weird:

string[] personArray;
Person tempPerson = new Person(); 
List<Person> people = new List<Person>();
foreach (string line in lines)//lines are the people from file, it is correct
{
personArray = line.Split(',');
if (personArray.Length == 2)
{
tempPerson.Name = personArray[0];
tempPerson.Address = personArray[1];
people.Add(tempPerson);
}
}

I step through the code and the first person is added properly, the second person is added look into people and they both have the second person's information. Everything looks right until after the add statement.

1 Answer 1

7

You need to move the initialization of

Person tempPerson = new Person();

into the loop

        string[] personArray;

        List<Person> people = new List<Person>();
        foreach (string line in lines)//lines are the people from file, it is correct
        {
          personArray = line.Split(',');
          if (personArray.Length == 2)
          {
           Person tempPerson = new Person();
           tempPerson.Name = personArray[0];
           tempPerson.Address = personArray[1];
           people.Add(tempPerson);
          }
        }

Otherwise you are changing the properties of the same object.

3
  • Thank you so much. I thought it wasn't a problem in the add? I do this in C++ and it works fine?
    – Lainezor
    Jun 1, 2013 at 18:01
  • 1
    @Lainezor: And this is why it's important to learn about the language you're actually using, rather than assuming all languages handle things the same way :) It's really important to understand the differences between references and objects in .NET. See pobox.com/~skeet/csharp/references.html
    – Jon Skeet
    Jun 1, 2013 at 18:02
  • 3
    @Lainezor - In C++ if you have a vector<Person> then people.push_back(tempPerson) will copy the tempPerson object into the vector. In C#, people.Add(tempPerson) adds a reference to tempPerson to the list. This means your list contains multiple copies of the same reference to a single Person object. You are mutating this object through your tempPerson reference, so the change appears in all list elements.
    – Lee
    Jun 1, 2013 at 18:07

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