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I am basically testing using the location for my android app. All it currently does is show some TextViews with the latitude and longitude of the user's location. However, what I wish to have is for the LocationListener to stop receiving updates after it has received a location, not for it to continue listening for updates.

public void updateLocation(Location location, Geocoder geocoder){
    TextView lat=(TextView)getView().findViewById(R.id.lat);
    TextView longt=(TextView)getView().findViewById(R.id.longt);    
    double lata=location.getLatitude();
    double longa=location.getLongitude();
    lat.setText(Double.toString(location.getLatitude()));
    longt.setText(Double.toString(location.getLongitude()));
}

public void FindLocation(Context context){
    final LocationManager locationManager=(LocationManager)context.getSystemService(Context.LOCATION_SERVICE);
    LocationListener locationListener = new LocationListener(){
          public void onLocationChanged(Location location){
        updateLocation(location);}
          public void onStatusChanged(String provider, int status, Bundle extras) {}
          public void onProviderEnabled(String provider) {}
          public void onProviderDisabled(String provider) {}
      };
    locationManager.requestLocationUpdates(LocationManager.NETWORK_PROVIDER, 0, 0, locationListener);
} 
}

This should be done after updateLocation() has been called but it cannot reference locationManager nor locationListener. I also cannot call it inside FindLocation() after updateLocation() has been called as 'Cannot refer to a non-final variable locationListener inside an inner class defined in a different method'. However, adding final to locationListener only yields the error 'locationListener may not have been initialised'. Is there anyway I can achieve this?

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Seems to me what you are looking for is to use the locationListener itself in one of its methods. You can do this with 'this'.

public void FindLocation(Context context){
    final LocationManager locationManager (LocationManager)context.getSystemService(Context.LOCATION_SERVICE);
    LocationListener locationListener = new LocationListener(){
        public void onLocationChanged(Location location){
            updateLocation(location);
            locationManager.removeUpdates(this);
        }
        public void onStatusChanged(String provider, int status, Bundle extras) {}
        public void onProviderEnabled(String provider) {}
        public void onProviderDisabled(String provider) {}
    };
    locationManager.requestLocationUpdates(LocationManager.NETWORK_PROVIDER, 0, 0, locationListener);
} 
| improve this answer | |
2

Make locationManager a class variable and final so you can reference it from anywhere within the class.

private final LocationManager locationManager;

and then define it inside onCreate like below:

protected void onCreate(Bundle savedInstanceState) {
        super.onCreate(savedInstanceState);



locationManager =(LocationManager)context.getSystemService(Context.LOCATION_SERVICE);
LocationListener locationListener = new LocationListener(){
      public void onLocationChanged(Location location){
    updateLocation(location);}
      public void onStatusChanged(String provider, int status, Bundle extras) {}
      public void onProviderEnabled(String provider) {}
      public void onProviderDisabled(String provider) {}
  };
locationManager.requestLocationUpdates(LocationManager.NETWORK_PROVIDER, 0, 0, locationListener);
}
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  • Aaaarrrrhhhhhgggg. My eyes are falling out of their sockets. My nose is melting and my dog is howling. The "global" disease is still here on SO. This is NOT a global variable, which by definition has scope and life time equal to the application. This is a class field (or class variable). -1 until you fix it. Where did you learn that a class field is global? Please tell me so I can insert something spiky into whoever wrote it! – Simon Jun 2 '13 at 9:57
  • haha, thanks for cheering me up at 3:00AM in Silicon Valley. fixed! :) – kushyar Jun 2 '13 at 9:59
  • Would this be the better approach or using locationManager.removeUpdates(this) as mentioned in the other comment? – cortex Jun 2 '13 at 10:22
  • 1
    @cortex Either works. It's a question of style. Personally, I prefer ljgw's answer since it limits the scope of the location manager. Good OOP design dictates that everything should have the smallest possible scope. – Simon Jun 2 '13 at 10:26
  • @Simon that is true, but when dealing with location, in a realistic scenario you will be dealing with the manager frequently and would probably want to avoid repetition. (correct me if I'm wrong please). – kushyar Jun 2 '13 at 10:30
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Make it a private field of the class, like this:

private LocationManager mLocationManager;
public void FindLocation(Context context){
    mLocationManager = (LocationManager)context.getSystemService(Context.LOCATION_SERVICE);
...
}

Now you can access mLocationManager from anywhere in the class.

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