25

How to do validations before saving the edited data in mongoose?

For example, if sample.name already exists in the database, the user will receive a some sort of error, something like that, here's my code below

//Post: /sample/edit
app.post(uri + '/edit', function (req, res, next) {
  Sample.findById(req.param('sid'), function (err, sample) {

    if (err) {
      return next(new Error(err));
    }

    if (!sample) {
      return next(new Error('Invalid reference to sample information'));
    }

    // basic info
    sample.name = req.body.supplier.name;
    sample.tin = req.body.supplier.tin;

    // contact info
    sample.contact.email = req.body.supplier.contact.email;
    sample.contact.mobile = req.body.supplier.contact.mobile;
    sample.contact.landline = req.body.supplier.contact.landline;
    sample.contact.fax = req.body.supplier.contact.fax;

    // address info
    sample.address.street = req.body.supplier.address.street;
    sample.address.city = req.body.supplier.address.city;
    sample.address.state = req.body.supplier.address.state;
    sample.address.country = req.body.supplier.address.country;
    sample.address.zip = req.body.supplier.address.zip;

    sample.save(function (err) {
      if (err) {
        return next(new Error(err));
      }

      res.redirect(uri + '/view/' + sample._id);
    });

  });
});
58

Typically you could use mongoose validation but since you need an async result (db query for existing names) and validators don't support promises (from what I can tell), you will need to create your own function and pass a callback. Here is an example:

var mongoose = require('mongoose'),
    Schema = mongoose.Schema,
    ObjectId = Schema.ObjectId;

mongoose.connect('mongodb://localhost/testDB');

var UserSchema = new Schema({
    name: {type:String}
});

var UserModel = mongoose.model('UserModel',UserSchema);

function updateUser(user,cb){
    UserModel.find({name : user.name}, function (err, docs) {
        if (docs.length){
            cb('Name exists already',null);
        }else{
            user.save(function(err){
                cb(err,user);
            });
        }
    });
}

UserModel.findById(req.param('sid'),function(err,existingUser){
   if (!err && existingUser){
       existingUser.name = 'Kevin';
       updateUser(existingUser,function(err2,user){
           if (err2 || !user){
               console.log('error updated user: ',err2);
           }else{
               console.log('user updated: ',user);
           }

       });
   } 
});

UPDATE: A better way

The pre hook seems to be a more natural place to stop the save:

UserSchema.pre('save', function (next) {
    var self = this;
    UserModel.find({name : self.name}, function (err, docs) {
        if (!docs.length){
            next();
        }else{                
            console.log('user exists: ',self.name);
            next(new Error("User exists!"));
        }
    });
}) ;

UPDATE 2: Async custom validators

It looks like mongoose supports async custom validators now so that would probably be the natural solution:

    var userSchema = new Schema({
      name: {
        type: String,
        validate: {
          validator: function(v, cb) {
            User.find({name: v}, function(err,docs){
               cb(docs.length == 0);
            });
          },
          message: 'User already exists!'
        }
      }
    });
  • 4
    You're not calling "next()" in if the user exists, I think you should call next() with an error – Amir T Nov 22 '13 at 18:39
  • 8
    why not just using the unique param on the name field? – udidu Oct 22 '14 at 17:02
  • how will user be having save() method on it? – A.B Dec 31 '14 at 16:42
  • 1
    I get this error when I put a find in the pre middleware: Uncaught TypeError: Object #<Object> has no method 'find' – Jeremy Jun 16 '15 at 5:18
  • 2
    Using a unique index is the best practice here. Otherwise you have to query the collection before insert, whereas if you use a unique index mongodb will just reject the insert, saving round trip time, and time spent querying a collection. A unique index would be the very best solution here. – tsturzl Aug 5 '16 at 18:25
9

Another way to continue with the example @nfreeze used is this validation method:

UserModel.schema.path('name').validate(function (value, res) {
    UserModel.findOne({name: value}, 'id', function(err, user) {
        if (err) return res(err);
        if (user) return res(false);
        res(true);
    });
}, 'already exists');
  • 1
    What is path? could you elaborate on this – Andrew Ravus Nov 15 '16 at 14:53
  • This worked for me and does seem like the most elegant way, but it throws a deprecation error, i.e. DeprecationWarning: Implicit async custom validators (custom validators that take 2 arguments) are deprecated in mongoose >= 4.9.0. – Marko Jul 2 '17 at 2:29
  • 1
    mongoosejs.com/docs/validation.html#async-custom-validators Even if you don't want to use asynchronous validators, be careful, because mongoose 4 will assume that all functions that take 2 arguments are asynchronous, like the validator.isEmail function. This behavior is considered deprecated as of 4.9.0, and you can shut it off by specifying isAsync: false on your custom validator. – Marko Jul 2 '17 at 2:37
2

Here is another way to accomplish this in less code.

UPDATE 3: Asynchronous model class statics

Similar to option 2, this allows you to create a function directly linked to the schema, but called from the same file using the model.

model.js

 userSchema.statics.updateUser = function(user, cb) {
  UserModel.find({name : user.name}).exec(function(err, docs) {
    if (docs.length){
      cb('Name exists already', null);
    } else {
      user.save(function(err) {
        cb(err,user);
      }
    }
  });
}

Call from file

var User = require('./path/to/model');

User.updateUser(user.name, function(err, user) {
  if(err) {
    var error = new Error('Already exists!');
    error.status = 401;
    return next(error);
  }
});
2

In addition to already posted examples, here is another approach using express-async-wrap and asynchronous functions (ES2017).

Router

router.put('/:id/settings/profile', wrap(async function (request, response, next) {
    const username = request.body.username
    const email = request.body.email
    const userWithEmail = await userService.findUserByEmail(email)
    if (userWithEmail) {
        return response.status(409).send({message: 'Email is already taken.'})
    }
    const userWithUsername = await userService.findUserByUsername(username)
    if (userWithUsername) {
        return response.status(409).send({message: 'Username is already taken.'})
    }
    const user = await userService.updateProfileSettings(userId, username, email)
    return response.status(200).json({user: user})
}))

UserService

async function updateProfileSettings (userId, username, email) {
    try {
        return User.findOneAndUpdate({'_id': userId}, {
            $set: {
                'username': username,
                'auth.email': email
            }
        }, {new: true})
    } catch (error) {
        throw new Error(`Unable to update user with id "${userId}".`)
    }
}

async function findUserByEmail (email) {
    try {
        return User.findOne({'auth.email': email.toLowerCase()})
    } catch (error) {
        throw new Error(`Unable to connect to the database.`)
    }
}

async function findUserByUsername (username) {
    try {
        return User.findOne({'username': username})
    } catch (error) {
        throw new Error(`Unable to connect to the database.`)
    }
}

// other methods

export default {
    updateProfileSettings,
    findUserByEmail,
    findUserByUsername,
}

Resources

async function

await

express-async-wrap

1

If you're searching by an unique index, then using UserModel.count may actually be better for you than UserModel.findOne due to it returning the whole document (ie doing a read) instead of returning just an int.

1

For anybody falling on this old solution. There is a better way from the mongoose docs.

var s = new Schema({ name: { type: String, unique: true }});
s.path('name').index({ unique: true });
  • (node:18024) DeprecationWarning: collection.ensureIndex is deprecated. Use createIndexes instead. – zipzit Oct 18 at 5:43
  • oops. Use mongoose.connect(DATABASE_URL, { useNewUrlParser: true, useUnifiedTopology: true, useCreateIndex: true }, err => { ... to preclude all warnings... – zipzit Oct 18 at 5:54

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.