95

Is there any good wrapper available for level based logging in golang? If not, how should I go about implementing one myself?

What I want is pretty simple. I want a few functions e.g.

log.Error()
log.Info()

etc that display their outputs to stdout as well as save these in a log file (based on the level given to the program as commandline argument). How do I implement this wrapper?

2

11 Answers 11

77

Some more suggestions, now that the existing answers are quite old:

4
  • Also godoc.org/go.uber.org/zap and binary logs github.com/ScottMansfield/nanolog github.com/larytet/binlog
    – Larytet
    Commented Dec 16, 2018 at 19:14
  • 2
    nanolog does not meet the "display their outputs to stdout" requirement. Binlog has zero GitHub stars.
    – Bryan
    Commented Dec 20, 2018 at 16:53
  • 1
    A little update from Dec. 2021, zerolog is one hell of an impressive framework github.com/rs/zerolog . A nice alternative to zap.
    – codie
    Commented Dec 9, 2021 at 18:09
  • In 2023 today, Go 1.21 comes with the standard log/slog package. No external library is needed anymore for average users. See my answer for the detail.
    – ynn
    Commented Aug 9, 2023 at 11:33
35

In 2023 today, Go 1.21.0 finally comes with a standard level logger: log/slog package.

No external library is needed anymore for average users.

1. Basic Usage

package main

import "log/slog"

func main() {
    slog.Info("hello")
    slog.Warn("hello")
    slog.Error("hello")
}
2023/08/09 20:05:49 INFO hello
2023/08/09 20:05:49 WARN hello
2023/08/09 20:05:49 ERROR hello

1.1 Enable Debug Log Level

playground

Debug log level is disabled by default. To enable it, call SetLogLoggerLevel() (available in Go 1.22 or later):

slog.SetLogLoggerLevel(slog.LevelDebug)

1.2 Disable Logging

playground

If you want (temporarily) to disable logging, the cleanest solution is to define your own logger (see 4. Create Your Own Logger for the details).

However, this hacky one-liner works:

slog.SetLogLoggerLevel(math.MaxInt)

2. Add Context

The name slog is short for structured logging, meaning each log entry can have a structure.

The log functions can optionally receive any number of key-value pairs:

package main

import "log/slog"

func main() {
    slog.Info("hello", "username", "Mike", "age", 18)
}
2023/08/09 20:07:51 INFO hello username=Mike age=18

3. Customize Format

log package can be used to customize the format of log/slog logger.

package main

import "log"
import "log/slog"

func main() {
    slog.Info("hello")
    log.SetFlags(log.Ldate | log.Lmicroseconds)
    slog.Info("hello")
}
2023/08/09 20:15:36 INFO hello
2023/08/09 20:15:36.601583 INFO hello

4. Create Your Own Logger

Basic usage is covered by the top-level functions (e.g. slog.Info()) but you can create your own logger for detailed customization.

A created logger can be set as the default logger via slog.SetDefault(). After that, the top-level functions (e.g. slog.Info()) use your logger.

4.1 Standard Loggers

Constructors are provided in log/slog package for some built-in loggers.

package main

import (
    "log/slog"
    "os"
)

func main() {
    //text logger
    {
        //The second argument enables `Debug` log level.
        handler := slog.NewTextHandler(os.Stderr, &slog.HandlerOptions{Level: slog.LevelDebug})
        slog.SetDefault(slog.New(handler))

        slog.Debug("hello", "username", "Mike", "age", 18)
    }

    //JSON logger
    {
        handler := slog.NewJSONHandler(os.Stderr, &slog.HandlerOptions{Level: slog.LevelDebug})
        slog.SetDefault(slog.New(handler))

        slog.Debug("hello", "username", "Mike", "age", 18)
    }
}
time=2023-08-09T20:31:05.798+09:00 level=DEBUG msg=hello username=Mike age=18
{"time":"2023-08-09T20:31:05.798984192+09:00","level":"DEBUG","msg":"hello","username":"Mike","age":18}

4.2 User-Defined Loggers

By implementing Handler interface, you can create a fully-customized logger.

package main

import (
    "context"
    "fmt"
    "log/slog"
    "os"
    "time"
)

type MyHandler struct{}

func (h MyHandler) Enabled(context context.Context, level slog.Level) bool {
    switch level {
    case slog.LevelDebug:
        return false
    case slog.LevelInfo:
        fallthrough
    case slog.LevelWarn:
        fallthrough
    case slog.LevelError:
        return true
    default:
        panic("unreachable")
    }
}

func (h MyHandler) Handle(context context.Context, record slog.Record) error {
    message := record.Message

    //appends each attribute to the message
    //An attribute is of the form `<key>=<value>` and specified as in `slog.Error(<message>, <key>, <value>, ...)`.
    record.Attrs(func(attr slog.Attr) bool {
        message += fmt.Sprintf(" %v", attr)
        return true
    })

    timestamp := record.Time.Format(time.RFC3339)

    switch record.Level {
    case slog.LevelDebug:
        fallthrough
    case slog.LevelInfo:
        fallthrough
    case slog.LevelWarn:
        fmt.Fprintf(os.Stderr, "[%v] %v %v\n", record.Level, timestamp, message)
    case slog.LevelError:
        fmt.Fprintf(os.Stderr, "!!!ERROR!!! %v %v\n", timestamp, message)
    default:
        panic("unreachable")
    }

    return nil
}

// for advanced users
func (h MyHandler) WithAttrs(attrs []slog.Attr) slog.Handler {
    panic("unimplemented")
}

// for advanced users
func (h MyHandler) WithGroup(name string) slog.Handler {
    panic("unimplemented")
}

func main() {
    logger := slog.New(MyHandler{})
    slog.SetDefault(logger)

    slog.Debug("hello") //=> does nothing (as `Enabled()` returns `false`)
    slog.Info("hello")  //=> [INFO] 2023-11-15T22:38:54+09:00 hello
    slog.Warn("hello")  //=> [WARN] 2023-11-15T22:38:54+09:00 hello
    slog.Error("hello") //=> !!!ERROR!!! 2023-11-15T22:38:54+09:00 hello

    //with attributes
    slog.Error("hello", "id", 5, "foo", "bar") //=> !!!ERROR!!! 2023-11-15T22:38:54+09:00 hello id=5 foo=bar

}

As the type of the log levels is defined as type Level int, you can even define your own log levels: The Go Playground

3
  • Could you add an example of how to print complex types like maps while in debug level?
    – tuxErrante
    Commented Mar 29 at 10:18
  • 1
    @tuxErrante How to enable the debug level is explained in the answer: see 1.1 Enable Debug Log Level or 4.2 User-Defined Loggers. In Go, pretty-print is another harder problem. See How to pretty print variables - Stack Overflow and use any method you want with 4.2 User-Defined Loggers in my answer. Personally I like pp package: pp.Println(yourMap).
    – ynn
    Commented Mar 29 at 13:24
  • Thanks indeed my issue was the positioning of the args in slog call and the printing of a complex map from there, I'm working on something similar to what you've linked me, but trying avoiding extra pkgs also because I'm not working with JSON here: goplay.tools/snippet/UcRUpWhPS8m
    – tuxErrante
    Commented Mar 30 at 21:54
6

https://github.com/hashicorp/logutils I found this to be very easy to use and you don't even need to change the method calls to log.Printf of the std library.

1
  • "The simplest thing that could possibly work" +1
    – BC.
    Commented Sep 3, 2021 at 17:51
6
  • Uber-go/Zap: Fast, structured, leveled logging in Go
  • Logrus: Structured, pluggable logging for Go. (JSON and text formatting)

Both libraries have level hooks also, which is a very interesting feature. Hooks can be registered for particular log levels. So for example any error(logged using log.Error()) occurs you can report to some monitoring tool etc.

1
  • one drawback of logrus is that it does n't have log rotation, need to use some external programs for that...
    – Madhu Tomy
    Commented Jan 27, 2021 at 16:27
4

I think seelog fits your requirements, and it seems to be pretty popular as it pops up often in log discussions. I never used it seriously, so I can't comment beyond that.

1
  • 1
    It looks as though seelog must acquire/release a global lock for each statement.
    – Eric Urban
    Commented Feb 25, 2014 at 18:10
3

Take a look at http://cgl.tideland.biz and there at the package "applog". It's working that way.

PS: The whole CGL is currently reworked and will soon be released with new features, but under a different name. ;)

3
  • unfortunately the links are dead Commented Jul 15, 2014 at 9:28
  • All the links are dead or don't have anything to do with logging.
    – neurosnap
    Commented Sep 21, 2015 at 16:55
  • Sorry for all the movements over time. Needed some time to find the current one as the IMHO best one. The packages are at github.com/tideland/golib and the documentation at godoc.org/?q=tideland%2Fgolib.
    – themue
    Commented Sep 21, 2015 at 20:26
2

stdlog fits exactly your requirements:

log := stdlog.GetFromFlags()
log.Info("Connecting to the server...")
log.Errorf("Connection failed: %q", err)
1

I am working with rlog at the moment and like their approach. The code looks good, simplistic and sufficiently documented.

What convinced me:

  • no external dependencies
  • i can use rlog.Info() anywhere without passing around references
  • good usage of environment variables
  • arbitrary number of trace levels e.g. rlog.Trace(4, "foo")
1

I have added logging level support to the built-in Go log package. You can find my code here:

https://github.com/gologme/log

In addition to adding support for Info, Warn, and Debug, users can also define their own arbitrary logging levels. Logging levels are enabled and disabled individually. This means you can turn on Debug logs without also getting everything else.

0

You can use the module midlog to implements any other log library, https://github.com/lingdor/midlog

1
0

One of the logging module that you can consider is klog . It support 'V' logging which gives the flexibility to log at certain level

klog is a fork of glog and overcomes following drawbacks

glog presents a lot "gotchas" and introduces challenges in containerized environments, all of which aren't well documented. glog doesn't provide an easy way to test logs, which detracts from the stability of software using it glog is C++ based and klog is a pure golang implementation

Sample Implementation

package main

import (
    "flag"

    "k8s.io/klog"


)

type myError struct {
    str string
}

func (e myError) Error() string {
    return e.str
}

func main() {
    klog.InitFlags(nil)
    flag.Set("v", "1")
    flag.Parse()

    klog.Info("hello", "val1", 1, "val2", map[string]int{"k": 1})
    klog.V(3).Info("nice to meet you")
    klog.Error(nil, "uh oh", "trouble", true, "reasons", []float64{0.1, 0.11, 3.14})
    klog.Error(myError{"an error occurred"}, "goodbye", "code", -1)
    klog.Flush()
}

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