I've run the following in the console on Firefox (version 21) and I'm getting results I don't expect.

new Date(1362891600000);

var date = new Date(1362891600000);
var time = date.getHours();
new Date(date.setHours(date.getHours() + 24));

The result really throws me for a loop.

The first date shows up as Eastern Daylight Time, while the second one shows up with Eastern Standard Time. It's totally backwards. This does not happen with IE or with Chrome.

What's going on here? enter image description here

  • Notice that, while the labels "Eastern Daylight Time" and "Eastern Standard Time" are backwards, the actual timezone offsets in use (GMT-0500 and GMT-0400) are correct. If the numeric timezone offset and timezone name do not match, then I can't imagine anything you did wrong could cause that. Therefore I would say it's a Firefox bug! – Celada Jun 3 '13 at 19:24
  • @Celada thanks... that's kind of what I was afraid of. I was hoping it was one of those "it looks like it's XYZ's bug but in reality it was me who actually did something wrong" type of scenarios. – Joseph Jun 3 '13 at 19:33
  • This is definitely a bug in Firefox. You should probably report it to them. However, be aware that anything after the offset is non-standard and support varies wildly across browsers and operating systems. You can display it to a user, but don't rely on it for anything critical. – Matt Johnson Jun 4 '13 at 2:57
  • thanks @Matt. If you could make that an answer I'll accept it. – Joseph Jun 4 '13 at 14:10
  • 2
    I've filed it as a bug here (bugzilla.mozilla.org/show_bug.cgi?id=879261) – Joseph Jun 4 '13 at 14:23
up vote 5 down vote accepted

This is definitely a bug in Firefox. You should probably report it to them.

However, be aware that anything after the offset is non-standard and support varies wildly across browsers and operating systems.

For example, some browsers display a time zone name, while others display an abbreviation or internal id. Also, some keep their own strings, and some use the values returned by the operating system. And on Windows, there is a different time zone database than on Linux or Mac. Also, some browsers may localize this string using language, locale, or culture settings.

You can display it to a user, if you know the value is in their own local time zone. But don't rely on it for anything critical.

  • Bug filed here: (bugzilla.mozilla.org/show_bug.cgi?id=879261) – Joseph Jun 4 '13 at 15:18
  • Bug appears to be back in FF 56.0.1 (64 bit). Looking at the history of the bug it appears to be fixed then not fixed then fixed then not fixed.... – Mark Wagoner Oct 11 '17 at 15:55

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