2

I am wondering if this is possible, what I want to do is set the type of list when I create an instance of this class.

class MyClass
{
    private Type _type = typeof(string);
    public MyClass(Type type)
    {
        this._type = type;
    }

    public List<_type> MyList { get; set; }  <----it does not like this
}
  • 1
    The easiest solution would be to make the class generic... – Patryk Ćwiek Jun 3 '13 at 19:02
8

Use a generic type definition:

class MyClass<T>
{   
    private Type _type = typeof(string);
    public MyClass()
    {
        this._type = typeof(T);
    }

    public List<T> MyList { get; set; }  <----it likes this
}

If you need to accept a passed in Type argument and generics won't work, you can do something like:

class MyClass
{   
    private Type _type = typeof(string);
    public MyClass(Type type)
    {
        this._type = typeof(type);
        this.MyList = Activator.CreateInstance(typeof(List<>).MakeGenericType(type));
    }

    public IList MyList { get; set; }  <----it likes this
}

The advantage is it enforces the type constraint on the list. Only items of the given type can be added to the list. The downside is you need to cast every item you get from it. It would be better if you avoided this sort of thing and used the generic example above. A third option is to elide generics entirely:

class MyClass
{   
    private Type _type = typeof(string);
    public MyClass(Type type)
    {
        this._type = typeof(type);
        this.MyList = new ArrayList();
    }

    public IList MyList { get; set; }  <----it likes this
}

This doesn't provide any type enforcement. Your mileage may vary.

  • 1
    Ninja'ed me by 4 seconds, but your answer is more beautiful and complete. – Renan Jun 3 '13 at 19:04
  • So given this how would you create a MyClass instance when given a Type object? This is just deferring the problem. The answer seems to assume that the OP doesn't actually need to do that. That may or may not be true; we can't really know. – Servy Jun 3 '13 at 19:06
  • @Servy you'd do something like MyClass<int> foo = new Myclass<int>(), for example. Just replace int with whatever type you want. – Renan Jun 3 '13 at 19:07
  • 2
    It's not necessary to set _type. Type is available thru the T Generic class parameter. – Jay Walker Jun 3 '13 at 19:10
  • 1
    @Servy I really don't understand your point. You cold build the code in the answer verbatim, and someone referencing it's assembly could use whatever type they liked - even if it's a type that's unknown in the project where this class stands. T is not necessarily a known type during compile time, but it will be known at runtime as you say. – Renan Jun 3 '13 at 19:11
6
class MyClass <T>
{
    public List<T> MyList { get; set; }
}
  • 2
    This was the resolution to my issue. Thanks, – DROP TABLE users Jun 3 '13 at 19:27
2

With generics it's easy:

class MyClass<T>
{
    public List<T> MyList { get; set; } 
}

http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/512aeb7t(v=vs.80).aspx

1
class MyClass<T>
{
    public MyClass()
    {
        MyList = new List<T>();
    }

    public List<T> MyList { get; set; }
}

and to use:

MyClass<string> x = new MyClass<string>();
x.MyList.Add("asdf");

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