15

As stated in the title, here is my code:

class Foo {

    public:
        Foo (int charSize) {
            str = new char[charSize];
        }
        ~Foo () {
            delete[] str;
        }
    private:
        char * str;
};

For this class what would be the difference between:

int main () {
    Foo* foo = new Foo(10);
    delete foo;
    return 0;
}

and

int main () {
    Foo* foo = new Foo(10);
    foo->~Foo();
    return 0;
}
4
  • You should never have a reason to call a destructor explicitly except for a few situations in which you'll know you need to.
    – chris
    Commented Jun 4, 2013 at 2:09
  • @chris Such as working around the lack of a placement delete: stackoverflow.com/questions/6783993/placement-new-and-delete Commented Jun 4, 2013 at 3:02
  • @ScottJones, Exactly.
    – chris
    Commented Jun 4, 2013 at 3:04
  • A similar situation happened to me. I had two pointers, ptr1 and ptr2, pointing to the same memory location on the heap. I used ptr1 to call destructor explicitly but then I could access to that location with ptr2. but when I used delete on ptr1, I could no longer access with ptr2 to my object.
    – soheil_ptr
    Commented Sep 3, 2014 at 16:26

2 Answers 2

24

Calling a destructor releases the resources owned by the object, but it does not release the memory allocated to the object itself. The second code snippet has a memory leak.

4
  • What do you mean by "releases resources owned by the object"? Things like files, locks? Commented Sep 3, 2021 at 23:42
  • 1
    @heretoinfinity in most cases it's dynamically-allocated memory for storing things outside of the object itself, but files and locks are excellent examples, too. Commented Sep 4, 2021 at 2:28
  • I am somewhat confused and need clarity. By "second snippet" in your answer, do you mean the line with delete foo; or foo->~Foo();? Does the destructor foo->~Foo() not free up memory and since the destructor has the delete statement? Commented Sep 6, 2021 at 11:16
  • 1
    @heretoinfinity foo->~Foo() does not free up the dynamic memory for the object itself. It does free up the memory for str. Commented Sep 6, 2021 at 13:59
2

Whenever a call to destructor is made , the allocated memory to the object is not released but the object is no longer accessible in the program. But delete completely removes the object from memory.

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service and acknowledge you have read our privacy policy.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.