28

How can you reverse the order of a div's children with pure CSS?

For example:

I want

<div id="parent">
    <div>A</div>
    <div>B</div>
    <div>C</div>
    <div>D</div>
</div>

to be displayed as:

D

C

B

A

I've created a demo on JSfiddle: http://jsfiddle.net/E7cVs/2/

  • 2
    I guess the only way to do it purely with css is working with positioning. – Sven Bieder Jun 4 '13 at 13:09
  • Which browsers do you need to support (because this would be a great way to start playing with flexbox) – Mike Robinson Jun 4 '13 at 13:11
  • I prefer to support all browsers – Angelo A Jun 4 '13 at 13:14
  • @MikeRobinson Please put there in an answer which works... and if it's only in the newest webkit/firefox nightly; I don't know any way with the traditional methods. – bwoebi Jun 4 '13 at 13:18
  • @AngeloA Why is absolute positioning undesirable? – crush Jun 4 '13 at 13:29

10 Answers 10

19

A little bit tricky, but can work; just to give you the idea:

div#top-to-bottom {
    position: absolute;
    width:50px;
    text-align: left;
    float: left;
    -webkit-transform: scaleY(-1);
    transform: scaleY(-1);
}
div#top-to-bottom > div {
    width: 50px;
    height: 50px;
    position: relative;
    float: right;
    display: block;
    -webkit-transform: scaleY(-1);
    transform: scaleY(-1);
}

mirror in the vertical axis both the container and the childs. The childs follow the inverted y axis of the container, but the children themselves are again head up.

demo

  • Ah this might be the best solution! Thanks sir. – Angelo A Jun 4 '13 at 22:37
62

The modern answer is

#parent {
  display: flex;
  flex-direction: column-reverse;
}
8
<style>
#parent{
    display: -webkit-flex; /* Safari */
    -webkit-flex-direction: row-reverse; /* Safari 6.1+ */
    display: flex;
    flex-direction: row-reverse;
}
</style>
  • A quick note with this- if you have overflow on the div, it won't scroll properly with column-reverse in Firefox and IE/Edge (but works just fine in Chrome). Quick fiddle: jsfiddle.net/jbkmy4dc/3 – TranquilMarmot Dec 13 '15 at 8:47
7

CSS only solution: ( I switched all selectors to class selectors as to not deal with specificity issues that could occur. Just an habit of mine and others. I've also removed styles not relevant to the example. )

.top-to-bottom {
    position: absolute;
}

.child {
    width: 50px;
    height: 50px;
    margin-top: -100px; /* height * 2 */
}

.child:nth-child(1) {
    margin-top: 150px; /* height * ( num of childs -1 )  */
}

.a {
    background:blue;

}
.b {
    background:red;
}

.c {
    background:purple;
}

.d {
    background:green;
}

Demo: http://jsfiddle.net/zA4Ee/3/

Javascript solution:

var parent = document.getElementsByClassName('top-to-bottom')[0],
    divs = parent.children,
    i = divs.length - 1;

for (; i--;) {
    parent.appendChild(divs[i])
}

Demo: http://jsfiddle.net/t6q44/5/

  • 1
    Thank you for your solution, it's only not exactly what I'm looking for either. I think it can't be fixed with CSS only, therefore I will use JS. Thanks. – Angelo A Jun 4 '13 at 18:39
  • Your answer says there is a CSS only solution, but Javascript is included in the jsfiddle demo. – crush Jun 4 '13 at 18:44
  • Its just to toggle the 'switch' class. It's not part of the solution. You don't need it at all. Its just cool to see divs switching their order. – banzomaikaka Jun 4 '13 at 19:47
4

You can do this with pure CSS, but there are major caveats. Try using one of the following methods, but both have draw their backs:

  1. Floating your divs right. This will only work if your elements appear horizontally. It will also shift your elements to the right. As soon as you clear them or return them to the normal document flow, the order will revert.
  2. By using absolute positioning. This is tricky for elements that do not have a defined height.

Floating right will reverse the order in which they're displayed horizontally. Here's a jsFiddle demo.

<div id="parent">
    <div>A</div>
    <div>B</div>
    <div>C</div>
</div>

#parent div {
    float: right;
}

Absolute position will break out the elements from the normal document flow and allow you to position then precisely as you choose. Here's a fiddle demo.

  • 2
    I tried both of these methods, and neither succeeded. Can you post a fiddle? – crush Jun 4 '13 at 13:11
  • See my edit. I included a demo. – Mohamad Jun 4 '13 at 13:15
  • your demo doesn't work. They are still in same order: A, B, C, D – crush Jun 4 '13 at 13:15
  • 2
    @Mohamad This is not the expected? Expected order is the inverted. – bwoebi Jun 4 '13 at 13:15
  • My bad, I made a mistake. I edited the answer to reflect this. This will only work if the elements are floated. As soon as you clear them it fails. – Mohamad Jun 4 '13 at 13:21
1

Here's a simpler, more portable, fully prefixed take on @vals answer. Note that CSS3 2D Transforms only have 94% support as of February 2017.

.reverse, .reverse>* {
  -moz-transform: scale(1, -1);
  -webkit-transform: scale(1, -1);
  -o-transform: scale(1, -1);
  -ms-transform: scale(1, -1);
  transform: scale(1, -1);
}
<div class="reverse">
  <div>a</div>
  <div>b</div>
  <div>c</div>
  <div>d</div>
</div>

0

display: table-header-group; display: table-footer-group;

for children

display: table;

for parent

0

To build on flex answers presented elsewhere here, here is a complete cross-browser solution as per Autoprefixer:

#parent {
  display: -webkit-box;
  display: -ms-flexbox;
  display: flex;
  -webkit-box-orient: vertical;
  -webkit-box-direction: reverse;
      -ms-flex-direction: column-reverse;
          flex-direction: column-reverse;
} 
0

This is another easy modern way. Enjoy!

#parent{
     /* Just set display flex to parent div */
     display: -webkit-flex;
     display: -ms-flexbox;
     display: flex;
      
     /* Use this part if you need also a column direction */
     -webkit-flex-direction: column;
     -ms-flex-direction: column;
     flex-direction: column;
}

/* This way you can decide the order of the internal divs */
#parent div:nth-child(1){
    -webkit-order: 4;
    -ms-order: 4;
    order: 4;
}
#parent div:nth-child(2){
    -webkit-order: 3;
    -ms-order: 3;
    order: 3;
}
#parent div:nth-child(3){
    -webkit-order: 2;
    -ms-order: 2;
    order: 2;
}
#parent div:nth-child(4){
    -webkit-order: 1;
    -ms-order: 1;
    order: 1;
}
 
<div id="parent">
    <div>A</div>
    <div>B</div>
    <div>C</div>
    <div>D</div>
</div>

-3

Use abosolute positioning and top left

  • I dont want to absolute position each element. For me that's solving a problem with a problem. I need position relative. – Angelo A Jun 4 '13 at 13:13
  • Here is fiddle of it working with absolute positioning: jsfiddle.net/E7cVs/5 but it's not the answer he wants. – crush Jun 4 '13 at 13:14
  • I already figured absolute positioning out. But I really need this to work with relative positioning. – Angelo A Jun 4 '13 at 13:18
  • Here is a fiddle with relative positioning, but I don't think it's what you want either: jsfiddle.net/E7cVs/7 – crush Jun 4 '13 at 13:21

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