13

Suppose I have Table A and Table B. Table B references Table A. I want to deep copy a set of rows in Table A and Table B. I want all of the new Table B rows to reference the new Table A rows.

Note that I'm not copying the rows into any other tables. The rows in table A will be copied into table A, and the rows in table B will be copied into table B.

How can I ensure that the foreign key references get readjusted as part of the copy?

To clarify, I'm trying to find a generic way to do this. The example I'm giving involves two tables, but in practice the dependency graph may be much more complicated. Even a generic way to dynamically generate SQL to do the work would be fine.

UPDATE:

People are asking why this is necessary, so I'll give some background. It may be way too much, but here goes:

I'm working with an old desktop application that's been moved to a client-server model. But, the application still uses a rudimentary in-house binary file format for storing data for its tables. A data file is just a header followed by a series of rows, each of which is just the binary serialized field values, the order of which is determined by a schema text file. The only thing good about it is that it's very fast. It's terrible in every other respect. I'm moving the application to SQL Server and trying not to degrade the performance too badly.

This is a kind of scheduling application; the data's not critical to anybody, and there's no audit tracking, etc. necessary. It's not a supermassive amount of data, and we don't necessarily need to keep very old data around if the database grows too large.

One feature that they are accustomed to is the ability to duplicate entire schedules in order to create "what-if" scenarios that they can muck with. Any user can do this as many times as they want, as often as they want. In the old database, the data files for each schedule are stored in their own data folder, identified by name. So, copying a schedule was as simple as copying the data folder and renaming it.

I must be able to do effectively the same thing with SQL Server or the migration will not work. Maybe you're thinking that I can just only copy the data that actually gets changed in order to avoid redundancy; but that honestly sounds too complicated to be feasible.

To throw another wrench into the mix, there can be a hierarchy of schedule data folders. So, a data folder may contain a data folder, which may contain a data folder. And the copying can occur at any level.

In SQL Server, I'm implementing a nested set hierarchy to mimic this. I have a DATA_SET table like this:

CREATE TABLE dbo.DATA_SET
(
    DATA_SET_ID UNIQUEIDENTIFIER PRIMARY KEY,
    NAME NVARCHAR(128) NOT NULL,
    LFT INT NOT NULL,
    RGT INT NOT NULL
)

So, there's a tree structure of data sets. Each data set represents a schedule, and may contain child data sets. Every row in every table has a DATA_SET_ID FK reference, indicating which data set it belongs to. Whenever I copy a data set, I copy all the rows in the table for that data set, and every other data set, into the same table, but referencing new data sets.

So, here's a simple concrete example:

CREATE TABLE FOO
(
    FOO_ID BIGINT PRIMARY KEY,
    DATA_SET_ID BIGINT FOREIGN KEY REFERENCES DATA_SET(DATA_SET_ID) NOT NULL
)


CREATE TABLE BAR
(
    BAR_ID BIGINT PRIMARY KEY,
    DATA_SET_ID BIGINT FOREIGN KEY REFERENCES DATA_SET(DATA_SET_ID) NOT NULL,
    FOO_ID UNIQUEIDENTIFIER PRIMARY KEY
)

INSERT INTO FOO
SELECT 1, 1 UNION ALL
SELECT 2, 1 UNION ALL
SELECT 3, 1 UNION ALL

INSERT INTO BAR
SELECT 1, 1, 1
SELECT 2, 1, 2
SELECT 3, 1, 3

So, let's say I copy data set 1 into a new data set of ID 2. After I copy, the tables will look like this:

FOO
FOO_ID, DATA_SET_ID
1    1
2    1
3    1
4    2
5    2
6    2

BAR
BAR_ID, DATA_SET_ID, FOO_ID
1    1    1
2    1    2
3    1    3
4    2    4
5    2    5
6    2    6

As you can see, the new BAR rows are referencing the new FOO rows. It's not the rewiring of the DATA_SET_ID's that I'm asking about. I'm asking about rewiring the foreign keys in general.

So, that was surely too much information, but there you go.

I'm sure there are a lot of concerns about performance with the idea of bulk copying the data like this. The tables are not going to be huge. I'm not expecting more than 1000 records in any table, and most of the tables will be much much smaller than that. Old data sets can be deleted outright with no repercussions.

Thanks, Tedderz

4
  • Can you give an example of the data and what you expect? Jun 4 '13 at 18:42
  • So, you have 2 tables A & B that reference each other, and you want to copy a subset of them into tables C & D (keeping the referential integrity intact). Why would the foreign keys change at all? I think you're fine, unless there's some property of keys I'm not aware of.
    – PowerUser
    Jun 4 '13 at 21:13
  • Your design presumably isn't normalised? if I understand correctly you want to extract some rows and write them back unchanged but with new primary keys into tableA Then extract the rows from tableB that referenced the old rows you extracted from tableA and write them back to tableB referencing the new rows in tableA (I'm aware that I'm just repeating what you said but I want to confirm that I understand). Can you maybe describe your data because I can't conceive of a use case for this that wouldn't be better served with a normalised design. Jun 4 '13 at 22:04
  • Added background information in OP.
    – Tedderz
    Jun 5 '13 at 14:26
2

Here is an example with three tables that can probably get you started.

DB schema

CREATE TABLE users
    (user_id int auto_increment PRIMARY KEY, 
     user_name varchar(32));
CREATE TABLE agenda
    (agenda_id int auto_increment PRIMARY KEY, 
     `user_id` int, `agenda_name` varchar(7));
CREATE TABLE events
    (event_id int auto_increment PRIMARY KEY, 
     `agenda_id` int, 
     `event_name` varchar(8));

An SP to clone a user with his agenda and events records

DELIMITER $$
CREATE PROCEDURE clone_user(IN uid INT)
BEGIN
    DECLARE last_user_id INT DEFAULT 0;

    INSERT INTO users (user_name)
    SELECT user_name
      FROM users
     WHERE user_id = uid;

    SET last_user_id = LAST_INSERT_ID();

    INSERT INTO agenda (user_id, agenda_name)
    SELECT last_user_id, agenda_name
      FROM agenda
     WHERE user_id = uid;

    INSERT INTO events (agenda_id, event_name)
    SELECT a3.agenda_id_new, e.event_name
      FROM events e JOIN
    (SELECT a1.agenda_id agenda_id_old, 
           a2.agenda_id agenda_id_new
      FROM
    (SELECT agenda_id, @n := @n + 1 n 
       FROM agenda, (SELECT @n := 0) n 
      WHERE user_id = uid 
      ORDER BY agenda_id) a1 JOIN
    (SELECT agenda_id, @m := @m + 1 m 
       FROM agenda, (SELECT @m := 0) m 
      WHERE user_id = last_user_id 
      ORDER BY agenda_id) a2 ON a1.n = a2.m) a3 
         ON e.agenda_id = a3.agenda_id_old;
END$$
DELIMITER ;

To clone a user

CALL clone_user(3);

Here is SQLFiddle demo.

1

I recently found myself needing to solve a similar problem; that is, I needed to copy a set of rows in a table (Table A) as well as all of the rows in related tables which have foreign keys pointing to Table A's primary key. I was using Postgres so the exact queries may differ but the overall approach is the same. The biggest benefit of this approach is that it can be used recursively to go infinitely deep

TLDR: the approach looks like this

1) find all the related table/columns of Table A
2) copy the necessary data into temporary tables
3) create a trigger and function to propagate primary key column 
   updates to related foreign keys columns in the temporary tables
4) update the primary key column in the temporary tables to the next 
   value in the auto increment sequence
5) Re-insert the data back into the source tables, and drop the 
   temporary tables/triggers/function

1) The first step is to query the information schema to find all of the tables and columns which are referencing Table A. In Postgres this might look like the following:

SELECT tc.table_name, kcu.column_name
FROM information_schema.table_constraints tc
JOIN information_schema.key_column_usage kcu
ON tc.constraint_name = kcu.constraint_name
JOIN information_schema.constraint_column_usage ccu
ON ccu.constraint_name = tc.constraint_name
WHERE constraint_type = 'FOREIGN KEY'
AND ccu.table_name='<Table A>'
AND ccu.column_name='<Primary Key>'

2) Next we need to copy the data from Table A, and any other tables which reference Table A - lets say there is one called Table B. To start this process, lets create a temporary table for each of these tables and we will populate it with the data that we need to copy. This might look like the following:

CREATE TEMP TABLE temp_table_a AS (
    SELECT * FROM <Table A> WHERE ...
)

CREATE TEMP TABLE temp_table_b AS (
    SELECT * FROM <Table B> WHERE <Foreign Key> IN (
        SELECT <Primary Key> FROM temp_table_a
    )
)

3) We can now define a function that will cascade primary key column updates out to related foreign key columns, and trigger which will execute whenever the primary key column changes. For example:

CREATE OR REPLACE FUNCTION cascade_temp_table_a_pk()
RETURNS trigger AS
$$
BEGIN
   UPDATE <Temp Table B> SET <Foreign Key> = NEW.<Primary Key>
   WHERE <Foreign Key> = OLD.<Primary Key>;

   RETURN NEW;
END;
$$ LANGUAGE plpgsql;

CREATE TRIGGER trigger_temp_table_a
AFTER UPDATE
ON <Temp Table A>
FOR EACH ROW
WHEN (OLD.<Primary Key> != NEW.<Primary Key>)
EXECUTE PROCEDURE cascade_temp_table_a_pk();

4) Now we just update the primary key column in to the next value of the sequence of the source table (). This will activate the trigger, and the updates will be cascaded out to the foreign key columns in . In Postgres you can do the following:

UPDATE <Temp Table A>
SET <Primary Key> = nextval(pg_get_serial_sequence('<Table A>', '<Primary Key>'))

5) Insert the data back from the temporary tables back into the source tables. And then drop the temporary tables, triggers, and functions after that.

INSERT INTO <Table A> (SELECT * FROM <Temp Table A>)
INSERT INTO <Table B> (SELECT * FROM <Temp Table B>)
DROP TRIGGER trigger_temp_table_a
DROP cascade_temp_table_a_pk()

It is possible to take this general approach and turn it into a script which can be called recursively in order to go infinitely deep. I ended up doing just that using python (our application was using django so I was able to use the django ORM to make some of this easier)

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