18

I am new to Moq and testing in general so here is my noobish Q. How do I test if the Status property on Request has been set using Moq?

public class DudeManager
{
        private readonly IDRepository _repo;

        public DManager(IDRepository repo)
        {
            _repo = repo;
        }

        public void Create(Request r)
        {
            r.Status = Status.Submitted;
            _repo.AddRequest(r);
        }
}

Is there a better approach than the following? Maybe using VerifySet?

        [TestMethod]
        public void AddingNewRequestSetsStatusToSubmitted()
        {
            //Arrange
            var mock = new Mock<IDRepository>();
            var mockRequest = new Mock<Request>();
            var dManager = new DManager(mock.Object);

            //Act
            dManager.Create(mockRequest.Object);

            //Assert
            Assert.AreEqual(Status.Submitted, mockRequest.Object.Status);
        }

EDIT: This is the approach I ended up using after all the helpful suggestions:

//Arrange
var request = new Request();
var mock = new Mock<IDRepository>();
var dManager = new DManager(mock.Object);
mock.Setup(x => x.AddRequest(It.IsAny<Request>()));

//Act
dManager.QueueNewRequest(request);

//Assert
Assert.AreEqual(RequestStatus.Submitted, request.Status);

This approach seems right to me. Does anyone think otherwise?

  • I believe VerifySet is the best fit. – neontapir Jun 4 '13 at 20:58
  • Can you show me an example on how to use it? I tried using VerifySet but it blows up on me. – mithun_daa Jun 4 '13 at 21:01
  • I'm not convinced VerifySet does anything at all, I've never been able to fail a test with it, always passes. I go through the debugger and see my mock is callbase true, property in question is null, no invocations. VerifySet with a vale "Hello world" and the thing goes... pass. I would go with the unit testing framework and assert this equal that. – Tommy Holman Feb 8 '18 at 15:02
28

I think VerifySet is the right approach. It would look something like this:

//Arrange
var mock = new Mock<IDRepository>();
var mockRequest = new Mock<Request>();
// TODO: set some expectations here

var dManager = new DManager(mock.Object);

//Act
dManager.Create(mockRequest.Object);

//Assert
mockRequest.VerifySet(x => x.Status = Status.Submitted);

I believe in your case, it blows up because you haven't set up your Request mock to handle the set operation on Status.

One easy way to do that is using SetupAllProperties, like so:

//Arrange
var mock = new Mock<IDRepository>();
var mockRequest = new Mock<Request>();
mockRequest.SetupAllProperties();
  • It still fails with the following error: Test Outcome: Failed threw exception: System.ArgumentException: Invalid setup on a non-virtual (overridable in VB) member: – mithun_daa Jun 4 '13 at 21:35
  • 1
    Of course, Request isn't an interface in your case. You'd need to mark the Status property as virtual for this to work. And, as @AD.net mentioned below, unless Request has some complex behavior, there's no need to mock it. – neontapir Jun 5 '13 at 14:41
  • The other answer by Ufuk Hacıoğulları worked too but I modified this version without the mocked Request object. I liked the idea of not mocking the Request object and then using the Assert class to check if it is equal - not sure if this is the right way but it feels right to me (edited the post to show my modified/working version. Please comment if it is a bad practice. – mithun_daa Jun 5 '13 at 18:29
  • Not at all, I would only mock objects that have complex interactions that interfere with your ability to test. It's always preferable to use the real thing. – neontapir Jun 7 '13 at 17:28
6

I think you should use strict behavior by default, then you can make the verification with a single call. It also makes you write your test more explicitly.

[TestMethod]
public void AddingNewRequestSetsStatusToSubmitted()
{
    //Arrange
    var mock = new Mock<IDRepository>(MockBehavior.Strict);
    var mockRequest = new Mock<Request>(MockBehavior.Strict);
    var dManager = new DManager(mock.Object);

    mockRequest.SetupSet(item => item.Status = It.IsAny<StatusType>())
               .Verifiable();

    //Act
    dManager.Create(mockRequest.Object);

    //Assert
    Assert.AreEqual(mockRequest.Object.Status, Status.Submitted);
    mock.VerifyAll();
    mockRequest.VerifyAll();
}
4
mock.Verify(m=>m.AddRequest(It.Is<Request>(r=>r.Status == expectedStatus)));

You can verify that the AddRequest method gets called with parameter (Request) which has the correct Status. Also, mocking the Request object is not really necessary here.

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