76

This question already has an answer here:

Everyday I am connecting to a server through ssh. I go through this routine:

IC001:Desktop user$ ssh user@my.server.com
user@my.server.com's password: 

Last login: Tue Jun  4 10:09:01 2013 from 0.0.0.0
$

I would like to automate this process and create a bash script to do it for me. I don't care about security and okay to store my password openly in the script. I am also okay for it to get typed openly on the screen while the script gets executed. So I've created this:

#!/bin/bash          
ssh user@my.server.com
echo mypassword

But it doesn't work. I've also tried send instead of echo, but it also didn't work. Please advise if it is possible to do.

marked as duplicate by jm666, Joni, msw, Mark, Adrian Panasiuk Jun 5 '13 at 0:10

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

168

Double check if you are not able to use keys.

Otherwise use expect:

#!/usr/bin/expect -f
spawn ssh user@my.server.com
expect "assword:"
send "mypassword\r"
interact
  • 107
    uh...Is "assword" a typo or intended? – Jonathan Dumaine Jan 27 '14 at 22:59
  • 181
    It is intended: It matches Password and password. – michas Jan 28 '14 at 0:00
  • 5
    I tried this in TextExpander, but I get spawn: command not found. I tried it without the keyword, but nothing happens. – jowie Mar 27 '15 at 10:33
  • 5
    @jowie you should install expect with sudo apt-get install expect for example and then you'll have the spawn command – thiagoh Apr 8 '16 at 16:55
  • 19
    lol at the "uh..." comment – mancini0 Jul 13 '16 at 19:30
88

Create a new keypair: (go with the defaults)

ssh-keygen

Copy the public key to the server: (password for the last time)

ssh-copy-id user@my.server.com

From now on the server should recognize your key and not ask you for the password anymore:

ssh user@my.server.com
  • 3
    So the point is that you have very limited access to a server whose admin has locked down security and you want to leave your password in plaintext on your machine because the server owner's security concerns are bothersome to you. Did I get that right? Why don't you ask that sysadmin how he feels about your script? – msw Jun 4 '13 at 22:55
  • 1
    Needed to: ssh-agent bash && ssh-add as shown here solomonson.com/content/… to get this to work. – Gary Thomann Nov 8 '13 at 11:59
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    Oh snap! lmao @Prostak. I go to great lengths to distill my questions down to the bare minimum so that answerers/commenters don't get their panties in a bunch about things that have nothing to do with the actual question. – Chev Jan 30 '14 at 21:02
  • 7
    If you're on OSX or another OS that doesn't have ssh-copy-id then there are one-line alternatives here. – Chev Jan 30 '14 at 21:10
  • 4
    @Chev Also, ssh-copy-id is available from Homebrew. – robert Dec 21 '15 at 23:12

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