20
#include <iostream>

struct X {
    X(std::initializer_list<int> list) { std::cout << "list" << std::endl; }
    X(float f) { std::cout << "float" << std::endl; }
};

int main() {
    int x { 1.0f };
    X a(1);     // float (implicit conversion)
    X b{1};     // list
    X c(1.0f);  // float
    X d{1.0f};  // list (narrowing conversion) ARG!!!

    // warning: narrowing conversion of '1.0e+0f' from 'float' to 'int'
    // inside { } [-Wnarrowing]
}

Is there any other way of removing std::initializer_list from an overload list (i.e., making the non-list ctors more favorable) instead of using the ()-initialization, or at least prohibiting narrowing conversion to happen (apart from turning warning into error)?

I was using http://coliru.stacked-crooked.com/ compiler which uses GCC 4.8.

  • 1
    Good question, +1. But it's an interesting class which can be constructed from an arbitrary amount of integers or exactly one floating point number. – Angew is no longer proud of SO Jun 5 '13 at 12:13
  • 2
    @Angew: I would avoid judging reduced test cases too eagerly, for example did you know about std::discrete_distribution ? Not exactly identical, obviously, but still showing off why it could be desirable. – Matthieu M. Jun 5 '13 at 12:20
  • Herb Sutter covered this recently. Since you used brace-initialization, the initializer-list version is preferred. If you want the float constructor, you must use parentheses. See examples (d) and (e) here: herbsutter.com/2013/05/09/gotw-1-solution – Adrian McCarthy Jun 5 '13 at 16:44
19

Actually, a program containing a narrowing conversion in a brace list initializer is ill-formed. I am not sure why the compiler just gives you a warning, but it definitely should issue an error here (FWIW, Clang does that).

Also notice, that this is a narrowing (and therefore illegal) conversion as well:

int x { 1.0f }; // ERROR! Narrowing conversion required

Per paragraph 8.5.4/3 of the C++11 Standard:

List-initialization of an object or reference of type T is defined as follows:

— If T is an aggregate, aggregate initialization is performed (8.5.1). [...]

— Otherwise, if the initializer list has no elements [...]

— Otherwise, if T is a specialization of std::initializer_list<E>, [...]

— Otherwise, if T is a class type, constructors are considered. The applicable constructors are enumerated and the best one is chosen through overload resolution (13.3, 13.3.1.7). If a narrowing conversion (see below) is required to convert any of the arguments, the program is ill-formed. [...]

To be more precise, the Standard only says that a "diagnostic" is required in this case, and a warning is a diagnostic, so the compiler's behavior is conforming - but I believe emitting an error would be a better behavior.

| improve this answer | |
  • 1
    Narrowing conversions now apply to C-arrays (example). Therefore, making narrowing conversions an error could break existing code. – Morwenn Jun 5 '13 at 12:21
  • 1
    @Morwenn: That's true, but in this case we are not initializing an aggregate – Andy Prowl Jun 5 '13 at 12:24
  • 6
    @AndyProwl, building existing code with g++ -std=c++0x before narrowing conversions were downgraded to warnings caused previously well-formed (and sometimes provably correct! example) code to suddenly stop compiling. Narrowing conversions caused the majority of C++11 porting issues for at least two huge firms I know of, and my own experience in smaller code bases was similar. If you want an error use -pedantic-errors or -Werror=narrowing – Jonathan Wakely Jun 5 '13 at 13:34
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    I see now where the standard allows ill-formed code as long as it gives diagnostics, but it clearly labels such behaviour as an extension to the language, and as such, allowing narrowing here is non-portable at best, and it's likely only a matter of time before GCC makes this an error by default. In the mean-time, forcing an error is the most reasonable thing you can do in the OP's case. – Rick Yorgason Jun 5 '13 at 14:02
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    Rick is right: The standard doesn't allow ill-formed code, ill-formed means ill-formed. The term we often use for what GCC is doing here is that GCC has a conforming extension -- it emits a diagnostic as required, then continues on to give meaning to a program that has no legal meaning in ISO C++. – Herb Sutter Jun 5 '13 at 15:09
3

That looks like a compiler error. You should be getting an error instead of a warning. Brace initialization should never implicitly narrow.

From the standard (§ 8.5.4)

struct B {
  B(std::initializer_list<int>);
};
B b1 { 1, 2 }; // creates initializer_list<int> and calls constructor
B b2 { 1, 2.0 }; // error: narrowing
| improve this answer | |
  • 1
    The standard requires a diagnostic, so issuing a warning is conforming. You can use -pedantic-errors or -Werror=narrowing if you want an error. – Jonathan Wakely Jun 5 '13 at 13:35
2

You can achieve what you want with std::enable_if.

#include <iostream>
#include <type_traits>

struct X {
    template<typename T, typename = typename std::enable_if<std::is_same<T,int>::value>::type>
    X(std::initializer_list<T>) { std::cout << "list" << std::endl; }
    X(float) { std::cout << "float" << std::endl; }
};

int main() {
    X a(1);     // float (implicit conversion)
    X b{1};     // list
    X c(1.0f);  // float
    X d{1.0f};  // float (yay)
}

Works on both g++4.8 and clang 3.2

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  • enable_if is how you remove it from the list of candidates, but I don't think is_same is the right condition here (it prevents widening as well as narrowing). – Ben Voigt Sep 4 '13 at 16:17
  • You are right, of course, I didn't think of that. I think std::is_same<typename std::common_type<T,int>::type,int>::value would work though. – krzaq Nov 14 '13 at 2:47
0

You can use -Wno-c++11-narrowing to turn off the errors:

Here's a sample test program:

#include <cstdint>

struct foo {
    int32_t a;
};

void foo(int64_t val) {
    struct foo A = { val };
}

Compile with clang++-3.8 with just -std=c++11, we get the stated error:

enter image description here

Add -Wno-c++11-narrowing, golden silence :-)

enter image description here

Of course, the narrowing issue might come back to bite you later, but it might occasionally be easier to delay the technical debt pain till later. ymmv :-)

| improve this answer | |

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