4

I'm working on an irc bot as a way to help me learn c++ and I was wondering if it is possible to use a method as a variable like this:

//Irc.h
public:

void *onJoin(char* sender, char* channel);
/////

//Main.cpp
void join(char* sender, char* channel)
{
    cout << sender << endl;
    cout << channel << endl;
}
int main()
{
    Irc irc(stuff);
    irc.onJoin = join;
}
1

4 Answers 4

8

Yes, it is possible. These variables are called functions pointers. The can write it like this:

void onJoin( char* sender, char * channel );

int main(void)
{
    void (*func)(char *,char *);
    func = &onJoin;
    func( "sender", "channel" );
}

Alternatively you can use std::function<> for that. The code would be the same except for the first line in main() which is replaced by

    std::function<void(char*,char*)> func;

This is a bit more legible in my opinion. If you use this, then don't forget to add

#include <functional>

to the top of your file. Instead of using such variables in a function, you can also use them as member variables of any struct or class.

2
  • For the first version, you can just write auto func = &onJoin.
    – Appleshell
    Commented Jun 5, 2013 at 17:27
  • for functions use either typedef or auto, otherwise they just get confusing. Commented Jun 5, 2013 at 23:53
4

You need a pointer-to-function:

void* (*OnJoinFn)(char*, char*);

In your Irc class,

class Irc
{
public:
  OnJoinFn onJoin;
};

This can be assigned as you are doing above:

int main()
{
    Irc irc(stuff);
    irc.onJoin = join;
}

But I wonder, if you are just learning C++, do you really need a pointer-to-function? pointers-to-function are certianly legal and valid, but an unusual entity and I would typically expect to use some other mechanism. As a start, I would suggest looking in to abstract base classes:

class IIrc
{
public:
  virtual void* OnJoin(const char*, const char*) = 0;  // pure virtual
  virtual ~IIrc() {}; // Don't forget to implement a virtual destructor in any ABC
};

class MyIrc 
:
  public IIrc
{
public:
  void* OnJoin(const char* sender, const char* channel*)
  {
    // YOUR CODE HERE
  }
};

int main()
{
  IIrc* irc = new MyIrc;
  irc->OnJoin (...);
}

I've taken the liberty of introducing const correctness in OnJoin.

You should also consider not returning a void*, which bypasses most of C++'s type safety mechanisms, but a pointer to an actual object, or another interface.

Finally, using new (and delete, which is missing here, resulting in a memory leak) is poor practice. Instead, prefer to allocate things on the stack or, if you really need dynamic allocation, use a smart pointer.

1
  • Well, I'm relearning C++. Also I know I could just use a class that inherits the irc class but I figured I would try something new. Commented Jun 5, 2013 at 16:09
1

Whilst this is possible, I would suggest that you're most likely doing something wrong if you need to do this. The TYPICAL C++ way to do "we need to do this in different ways in different circumstances" is to use inheritance:

in irc.h:

   class ircBase
   {
     public:
      ... 
      virtual void onJoin(char *sender, char *channel) = 0;

   };

in ircXX.h:

   class ircXX: public ircBase
   {
     public:
      ... 
       virtual void onJoin(char *sender, char *channel)
       {
          cout << sender << endl;
          cout << channel << endl;
       }

   };

in ircYY.h:

   class ircYY: public ircBase
   {
     public:
      ... 
       virtual void onJoin(char *sender, char *channel)
       {
           ... do something else ... 
       }

   };

And then you create an object of the right kind for what you need.

0

What you're looking for is a function pointer:

class Irc
{
    public:
        void (*on_join)(char*, char*);
    //  ^^^^ ^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^
};

void join(char*, char*);

int main()
{
    Irc irc(stuff);
    irc.on_join = join;
}

Alternatively, you can use std::function so that you can pass capturing/non-capturing lambdas:

#include <functional>

class Irc
{
    public:
        std::function<void (char*, char*)> on_join;
    //  ^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^
};

int main()
{
    Irc irc(stuff);
    irc.on_join = [] (char* sender, char* channel)
    {
        std::cout << sender  << std::endl;
        std::cout << channel << std::endl;
    };
}

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