247

Is there any EASY way to sort an array in descending order like how they have a sort in ascending order in the Arrays class?

Or do I have to stop being lazy and do this myself :[

16 Answers 16

295

You could use this to sort all kind of Objects

sort(T[] a, Comparator<? super T> c) 

Arrays.sort(a, Collections.reverseOrder());

Arrays.sort() cannot be used directly to sort primitive arrays in descending order. If you try to call the Arrays.sort() method by passing reverse Comparator defined by Collection.reverseOrder() , it will throw the error

no suitable method found for sort(int[],comparator)

That will work fine with Integer array but will not work with an int array.

The only way to sort a primitive array in descending order is, first sort the array in ascending order and then reverse the array in place. This is also true for two-dimensional primitive arrays.

  • 100
    It cannot sort arrays of primitives – Masood_mj Jul 31 '12 at 1:24
  • 14
    Convert your primitives to their respective objects. Integer for int, Double for double, Boolean for boolean, etc. – Ishmael Aug 21 '13 at 15:32
  • 11
    if you still want to use your custom comparator: Collections.reverseOrder(this) – Sebastian Hojas Oct 23 '13 at 14:24
  • Collections.reverseOrder() takes no parameters (unless I'm missing something?), instead I used myComparator.reversed(). – jsaven Apr 17 '17 at 11:36
  • Arrays.sort() cannot be used directly to sort primitive arrays in descending order. If you try to call the Arrays.sort() method by passing reverse Comparator defined by Collection.reverseOrder() , it will throw the error - "no suitable method found for sort(int[],comparator<object>)" That will work fine with Integer array but will not work with an int array. The only way to sort a primitive array in descending order is, first sort the array in ascending order and then reverse the array in place. This is also true for two-dimensional primitive arrays. – akuriako Jan 2 '18 at 15:56
90

You can use this:

    Arrays.sort(data, Collections.reverseOrder());

Collections.reverseOrder() returns a Comparator using the inverse natural order. You can get an inverted version of your own comparator using Collections.reverseOrder(myComparator).

  • 8
    The OP wants to sort an array. Collections.sort() takes a List as input parameter, not an array. – Pascal Thivent Nov 8 '09 at 2:22
  • 1
    ops,i wrote Collections instead of Arrays.Its corrected now. – William Nov 8 '09 at 5:12
  • 3
    +1 for explaining how to use your own comparator. – dj18 Jul 6 '12 at 15:47
  • 2
    This code cannot sort int[] as it is. – Ashutosh Oct 5 '18 at 5:27
89

for a list

Collections.sort(list, Collections.reverseOrder());

for an array

Arrays.sort(array, Collections.reverseOrder());
  • 19
    int []array = {2,4,3,6,8,7}; Arrays.sort(array, Collections.reverseOrder()); is giving me an error! Error is: "The method sort(int[]) in the type Arrays is not applicable for the arguments (int[], Comparator<Object>)" – Dixit Singla Jul 9 '14 at 10:12
  • 6
    int is not an Object. Try use Integer[] instead. – Ornithopter Oct 10 '14 at 4:04
  • 2
    Why does Integer[] work and not int[]? – OpMt Mar 3 '15 at 9:12
  • 5
    int is a primary type while Integer is not. That's why Integer has methods like parse, toString, etc. – Ornithopter Mar 17 '15 at 4:50
51

an alternative could be (for numbers!!!)

  1. multiply the Array by -1
  2. sort
  3. multiply once again with -1

Literally spoken:

array = -Arrays.sort(-array)
  • 28
    {__________lol________} – Mickey Tin May 25 '15 at 13:30
  • 7
    This method is actually creative if we are sorting numbers, even though it is not generic and could cause problems for overflow... – hackjutsu May 28 '15 at 23:31
  • 2
    This is very good answer for primitive types. You are genius. – Halil İbrahim Oymacı Oct 27 '16 at 20:18
  • 2
    Except that it'll fail for Integer.MIN_VALUE (or whichever primitive is used). Would be better to sort(), then reverse(), but you'll have to do the reversing yourself, since they didn't add Arrays.reverse() implementations. – Andreas Nov 1 '16 at 23:33
  • 6
    @line You must multiple -1 to array. Above code is pseudo code. You can multiple -1 to array in a for loop then call Array.sort() method, lastly you multiple -1 to array again. – Halil İbrahim Oymacı Apr 16 '17 at 11:03
47

without explicit comparator:

Collections.sort(list, Collections.reverseOrder());

with explicit comparator:

Collections.sort(list, Collections.reverseOrder(new Comparator()));
7

Java 8:

Arrays.sort(list, comparator.reversed());

Update: reversed() reverses the specified comparator. Usually, comparators order ascending, so this changes the order to descending.

  • 1
    It's work perfectly with Objects but not with primitives. For sort primitive int, you should sort in ASC order and then reverse the answer. – Russell Sk. Mar 19 at 5:06
4

For array which contains elements of primitives if there is org.apache.commons.lang(3) at disposal easy way to reverse array (after sorting it) is to use:

ArrayUtils.reverse(array);
  • 1
    Why to sort it first in ascending order and then use external library to revert this order, when it can be done in one step? – Betlista Apr 17 '14 at 16:04
  • And that one step being? – Josip Maslac Apr 18 '14 at 14:17
  • see the answers above - Arrays.sort() with reverseOrder comparator... – Betlista Apr 22 '14 at 9:54
  • 5
    Yes but (as stated in the comments to those answers) that doesn't work for primitives which my answer address. Ofcourse my answer is certainly not the optimal one but I found it to meet the criteria of being "easy" which the original author emphasized - ie. Arrays.sort(primitives); ArrayUtils.reverse(primitives); – Josip Maslac Apr 22 '14 at 14:27
4

I don't know what your use case was, however in addition to other answers here another (lazy) option is to still sort in ascending order as you indicate but then iterate in reverse order instead.

4

First you need to sort your array using:

Collections.sort(Myarray);

Then you need to reverse the order from ascending to descending using:

Collections.reverse(Myarray);
3

Another solution is that if you're making use of the Comparable interface you can switch the output values which you had specified in your compareTo(Object bCompared).

For Example :

public int compareTo(freq arg0) 
{
    int ret=0;
    if(this.magnitude>arg0.magnitude)
        ret= 1;
    else if (this.magnitude==arg0.magnitude)
        ret= 0;
    else if (this.magnitude<arg0.magnitude)
        ret= -1;
    return ret;
}

Where magnitude is an attribute with datatype double in my program. This was sorting my defined class freq in reverse order by it's magnitude. So in order to correct that, you switch the values returned by the < and >. This gives you the following :

public int compareTo(freq arg0) 
{
    int ret=0;
    if(this.magnitude>arg0.magnitude)
        ret= -1;
    else if (this.magnitude==arg0.magnitude)
        ret= 0;
    else if (this.magnitude<arg0.magnitude)
        ret= 1;
    return ret;
}

To make use of this compareTo, we simply call Arrays.sort(mFreq) which will give you the sorted array freq [] mFreq.

The beauty (in my opinion) of this solution is that it can be used to sort user defined classes, and even more than that sort them by a specific attribute. If implementation of a Comparable interface sounds daunting to you, I'd encourage you not to think that way, it actually isn't. This link on how to implement comparable made things much easier for me. Hoping persons can make use of this solution, and that your joy will even be comparable to mine.

2
array.sort(function(a, b) {return b - a;}); //descending 

or

array.sort(function(a, b) {return a - b;}); //ascending
  • 4
    How is that relevant to Java question? – Dmitry Ginzburg Apr 23 '18 at 7:19
1

It's not directly possible to reverse sort an array of primitives (i.e., int[] arr = {1, 2, 3};) using Arrays.sort() and Collections.reverseOrder() because those methods require reference types (Integer) instead of primitive types (int).

However, we can use Java 8 Stream to first box the array to sort in reverse order:

// an array of ints
int[] arr = {1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6};

// an array of reverse sorted ints
int[] arrDesc = Arrays.stream(arr).boxed()
    .sorted(Collections.reverseOrder())
    .mapToInt(Integer::intValue)
    .toArray();

System.out.println(Arrays.toString(arrDesc)); // outputs [6, 5, 4, 3, 2, 1]
0

I know that this is a quite old thread, but here is an updated version for Integers and Java 8:

Arrays.sort(array, (o1, o2) -> o2 - o1);

Note that it is "o1 - o2" for the normal ascending order (or Comparator.comparingInt()).

This also works for any other kinds of Objects. Say:

Arrays.sort(array, (o1, o2) -> o2.getValue() - o1.getValue());
  • This only works for reference type arrays, not arrays of primitive types. – kimbaudi Jun 19 at 18:14
0

This worked for me:

package doublearraysort;

import java.util.Arrays;
import java.util.Collections;

public class Gpa {


    public static void main(String[] args) {
        // initializing unsorted double array
        Double[] dArr = new Double[] {                 
            new Double(3.2),
            new Double(1.2),
            new Double(4.7),
            new Double(3.3),
            new Double(4.6),
           };
        // print all the elements available in list
        for (double number : dArr) {
            System.out.println("GPA = " + number);
        }

        // sorting the array
        Arrays.sort(dArr, Collections.reverseOrder());

        // print all the elements available in list again
        System.out.println("The sorted GPA Scores are:");
        for (double number : dArr) {
            System.out.println("GPA = " + number);
        }
    }
}

Output:

GPA = 3.2
GPA = 1.2
GPA = 4.7
GPA = 3.3
GPA = 4.6
The sorted GPA Scores are:
GPA = 4.7
GPA = 4.6
GPA = 3.3
GPA = 3.2
GPA = 1.2
0
public double[] sortArrayAlgorithm(double[] array) { //sort in descending order
    for (int i = 0; i < array.length; i++) {
        for (int j = 0; j < array.length; j++) {
            if (array[i] >= array[j]) {
                double x = array[i];
                array[i] = array[j];
                array[j] = x;
            }
        }
    }
    return array;
}

just use this method to sort an array of type double in descending order, you can use it to sort arrays of any other types(like int, float, and etc) just by changing the "return type", the "argument type" and the variable "x" type to the corresponding type. you can also change ">=" to "<=" in the if condition to make the order ascending.

0

You could use stream operations (Collections.stream()) with Comparator.reverseOrder().

For example, say you have this collection:

List<String> items = new ArrayList<>();
items.add("item01");
items.add("item02");
items.add("item03");
items.add("item04");
items.add("item04");

To print the items in their "natural" order you could use the sorted() method (or leave it out and get the same result):

items.stream()
     .sorted()
     .forEach(item -> System.out.println(item));

Or to print them in descending (reverse) order, you could use the sorted method that takes a Comparator and reverse the order:

items.stream()
     .sorted(Comparator.reverseOrder())
     .forEach(item -> System.out.println(item));

Note this requires the collection to have implemented Comparable (as do Integer, String, etc.).

protected by Community Apr 29 '18 at 8:16

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