27

Example:

$ cd lib
$ git absolute-path test.c # how to do this?
lib/test.c
  • 9
    "absolute path" and "relative to the repo" seem to contradict each other? – WiseOldDuck Aug 27 '15 at 19:56
25
0

As of at least git 1.6.0, use ls-files:

$ cd lib
$ git ls-files --full-name test.c
lib/test.c

For older git, use git ls-tree:

$ cd lib
$ git ls-tree --full-name --name-only HEAD test.c
lib/test.c

This only works for files that have been committed into the repo, but it's better than nothing.

| improve this answer | |
5
0

Pasting the following into your bash terminal will work, regardless of whether "test.c" currently exists or not. You can copy the git-absolute-path function into your .bashrc file for future convenience.

git-absolute-path () {
    fullpath=$([[ $1 = /* ]] && echo "$1" || echo "$PWD/${1#./}")
    gitroot="$(git rev-parse --show-toplevel)" || return 1
    [[ "$fullpath" =~ "$gitroot" ]] && echo "${fullpath/$gitroot\//}"
}

git-absolute-path test.c
| improve this answer | |
  • 1
    Mac OS X "readlink" doesn't have -f (and I presume *BSD). Suggestions on a portable way to do this? – TomOnTime Mar 10 '15 at 20:17

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