16

I was browsing crackstation.net website and came across this code which was commented as following:

Compares two byte arrays in length-constant time. This comparison method is used so that password hashes cannot be extracted from on-line systems using a timing attack and then attacked off-line.

 private static bool SlowEquals(byte[] a, byte[] b)
    {
        uint diff = (uint)a.Length ^ (uint)b.Length;
        for (int i = 0; i < a.Length && i < b.Length; i++)
            diff |= (uint)(a[i] ^ b[i]);
        return diff == 0;
    }

Can anyone please explain how does this function actual works, why do we need to convert the length to an unsigned integer and how this method avoids a timing attack? What does the line diff |= (uint)(a[i] ^ b[i]); do?

20

This sets diff based on whether there's a difference between a and b.

It avoids a timing attack by always walking through the entirety of the shorter of the two of a and b, regardless of whether there's a mismatch sooner than that or not.

The diff |= (uint)(a[i] ^ (uint)b[i]) takes the exclusive-or of a byte of a with a corresponding byte of b. That will be 0 if the two bytes are the same, or non-zero if they're different. It then ors that with diff.

Therefore, diff will be set to non-zero in an iteration if a difference was found between the inputs in that iteration. Once diff is given a non-zero value at any iteration of the loop, it will retain the non-zero value through further iterations.

Therefore, the final result in diff will be non-zero if any difference is found between corresponding bytes of a and b, and 0 only if all bytes (and the lengths) of a and b are equal.

Unlike a typical comparison, however, this will always execute the loop until all the bytes in the shorter of the two inputs have been compared to bytes in the other. A typical comparison would have an early-out where the loop would be broken as soon as a mismatch was found:

bool equal(byte a[], byte b[]) { 
    if (a.length() != b.length())
        return false;

    for (int i=0; i<a.length(); i++)
       if (a[i] != b[i])
           return false;
    return true;
}

With this, based on the amount of time consumed to return false, we can learn (at least an approximation of) the number of bytes that matched between a and b. Let's say the initial test of length takes 10 ns, and each iteration of the loop takes another 10 ns. Based on that, if it returns false in 50 ns, we can quickly guess that we have the right length, and the first four bytes of a and b match.

Even without knowing the exact amounts of time, we can still use the timing differences to determine the correct string. We start with a string of length 1, and increase that one byte at a time until we see an increase in the time taken to return false. Then we run through all the possible values in the first byte until we see another increase, indicating that it has executed another iteration of the loop. Continue with the same for successive bytes until all bytes match and we get a return of true.

The original is still open to a little bit of a timing attack -- although we can't easily determine the contents of the correct string based on timing, we can at least find the string length based on timing. Since it only compares up to the shorter of the two strings, we can start with a string of length 1, then 2, then 3, and so on until the time becomes stable. As long as the time is increasing our proposed string is shorter than the correct string. When we give it longer strings, but the time remains constant, we know our string is longer than the correct string. The correct length of string will be the shortest one that takes that maximum duration to test.

Whether this is useful or not depends on the situation, but it's clearly leaking some information, regardless. For truly maximum security, we'd probably want to append random garbage to the end of the real string to make it the length of the user's input, so the time stays proportional to the length of the input, regardless of whether it's shorter, equal to, or longer than the correct string.

| improve this answer | |
  • 1
    The result of a ^ b is not necessarily 1 when a and b are different. – ntoskrnl Jun 6 '13 at 5:37
  • It actually is no different rather than a normal one! as far as stopwatch is concerned in measuring the time ! – Rika Jul 14 '14 at 15:47
  • @Hossein You may need to run a lot of iterations of it to see the difference, which is how statistical attacks work. If you're seeing otherwise, I'd love to see the source. – Joseph Lennox Apr 12 '15 at 19:52
  • @ntoskml well, yes, it isn't always 1 exactly, but if a != b then a ^ b will never be 0 (i.e. it will always be 1 - 255). Since the SlowEquals is continually "or-ing" diff and the XOR of a and b and checking if diff == 0, then you know definitively if a equals b exactly or not. – viggity Jun 21 '16 at 20:23
  • 1
    @Miryafa: Yes--using min(a.length, b.length) still gives them some information. They can try lengths starting from 1 on upward. The time will increase each time, until they reach the correct length (then it will remain constant for large inputs). – Jerry Coffin Jun 29 '17 at 15:33
0

this version goes on for the length of the input 'a'

    private static bool SlowEquals(byte[] a, byte[] b)
    {
        uint diff = (uint)a.Length ^ (uint)b.Length;
        byte[] c = new byte[] { 0 };
        for (int i = 0; i < a.Length; i++)
            diff |= (uint)(GetElem(a, i, c, 0) ^ GetElem(b, i, c, 0));
        return diff == 0;
    }

    private static byte GetElem(byte[] x, int i, byte[] c, int i0)
    {
        bool ok = (i < x.Length);
        return (ok ? x : c)[ok ? i : i0];
    }
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  • 1
    I guess it's probably all right, but I'm certainly not fond of the return (ok ? x : c)[ok ? i : 0];. My immediate reaction is that it seems excessively clever. It's probably still not 100% effective either. If one string is much longer than the other, you end up with several iterations where (inside GetElem) ok will be false, and the branch becomes more predictable, leading to a speed increase. Preventing speed difference due to branch prediction, however, can be fairly difficult. – Jerry Coffin Jun 11 '19 at 17:13
  • @JerryCoffin i appreciate the feedback :). i didn't consider branch prediction. i guess it's not as simple as i though – symbiont Jun 11 '19 at 20:16
  • Yeah, being certain you've dealt well with branch prediction can be difficult. And in all honesty, I'm not sure it causes a problem in this case either (but I can see where it might). There's also a possibility of speed differences from caching--accessing c[0] repeatedly is likely to be faster than accessing successive elements of x. – Jerry Coffin Jun 11 '19 at 20:22

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