32

In C#, I can use something like:

List<string> myList = new List<string>();

if (myList.Count != myList.Distinct().Count())
{
    // there are duplicates
}

to check for duplicate elements in a list. However, when there are null items in list this produces a false positive. I can do this using some sluggish code but is there a way to check for duplicates in a list while disregarding null values with a concise way ?

5 Answers 5

56

If you're worried about performance, the following code will stop as soon as it finds the first duplicate item - all the other solutions so far require the whole input to be iterated at least once.

var hashset = new HashSet<string>();
if (myList.Where(s => s != null).Any(s => !hashset.Add(s)))
{
    // there are duplicates
}

hashset.Add returns false if the item already exists in the set, and Any returns true as soon as the first true value occurs, so this will only search the input as far as the first duplicate.

7
  • I thought GroupBy was deferred?
    – Jodrell
    Jun 6, 2013 at 13:14
  • 2
    @Jodrell It is deferred up until the point you try to read the first group, at which point it reads the entire input sequence, groups it, and returns the first group.
    – Rawling
    Jun 6, 2013 at 13:21
  • in that case, the HashSet is required.
    – Jodrell
    Jun 6, 2013 at 13:24
  • 1
    +1 This will give the best performance for very large collections. But not necessarily for small collections due to the overhead of creating / updating / reallocating the HashSet.
    – Joe
    Jun 6, 2013 at 15:09
  • 2
    @Joe Distinct does essentially the same thing with a HashSet under the hood, and GroupBy will do something similar as well.
    – Rawling
    Jun 6, 2013 at 15:17
32

I'd do this differently:

Given Linq statements will be evaluated lazily, the .Any will short-circuit - meaning you don't have to iterate & count the entire list, if there are duplicates - and as such, should be more efficient.

var dupes = myList
    .Where(item => item != null)
    .GroupBy(item => item)
    .Any(g => g.Count() > 1);

if(dupes)
{
    //there are duplicates
}

EDIT: http://pastebin.com/b9reVaJu Some Linqpad benchmarking that seems to conclude GroupBy with Count() is faster

EDIT 2: Rawling's answer below seems at least 5x faster than this approach!

14
  • +1 I prefer this to the other answers, seems more succinct to me.
    – Mr. Mr.
    Jun 6, 2013 at 11:10
  • 5
    The Any still requires the whole input to be iterated at least once (to build the groups), and some portion of it to be iterated a second time (to check the length of groups - although on second thought maybe the groups can shortcircuit Count without iterating) - whereas it's possible to perform this check with at most a single iteration of the whole input.
    – Rawling
    Jun 6, 2013 at 11:39
  • @Rawling I assumed since Count() is evaluated as part of the 'Any' - it would evaluate the grouping lazily - how could we test this? it's Quite interesting!
    – Dave Bish
    Jun 6, 2013 at 11:46
  • 1
    Well, you can use ILSpy to look for the implementation of GroupBy, but think about it this way - before GroupBy can return the first group, it needs to have consumed the entire input sequence in order to make sure it has all the items that will go into that group.
    – Rawling
    Jun 6, 2013 at 11:48
  • 1
    @Jodrell I'd expect immediately, as both Distinct and GroupBy also need to build up some kind of hash of the values.
    – Rawling
    Jun 6, 2013 at 13:32
11
var nonNulls = myList.Where(x => x != null)
if (nonNulls.Count() != nonNulls.Distinct().Count())
{
    // there are duplicates
}
1
  • 1
    this iterates the list twice though
    – jk.
    Jun 6, 2013 at 14:51
4

Well, two nulls are duplicates, aren't they?

Anyway, compare the list without nulls:

var denullified = myList.Where(l => l != null);
if(denullified.Count() != denullified.Distinct().Count()) ...
1
  • 3
    I can think of lots of situations not to consider nulls duplicates. We have a site where users can login via email or (optional) username. Users without a username have null for username, but no username can be duplicated.
    – xdumaine
    Jun 6, 2013 at 12:04
1

EDIT my first attempt sucks because it is not deferred.

instead,

var duplicates = myList
    .Where(item => item != null)
    .GroupBy(item => item)
    .Any(g => g.Skip(1).Any());

poorer implementation deleted.

1
  • @svick however, thats not lazy enough.
    – Jodrell
    Jun 6, 2013 at 13:19

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