19

I have a table, and in the left column I want to add an indicator for the row. I'm using a span to render the indicator, but I can't get the span to take up the full height:

<table>
    <tr>
        <td style="padding:0px;"><span style="height:100%; width:5px; background-color:pink;">&nbsp;</span></td>
        <td>Some content</td>
        <td>Some more content</td>
    </tr>
</table>

The table has a padding of 15px, so for the indicator col I remove the padding, and set the span to height:100%:

td {padding:15px;}
table {background-color: yellow;}

This fiddle shows it currently running - that pink bar needs to span the whole height of the containing td.

How do I do this? Note that I can't set the styling on the td instead of the span because that causes other issues with the rendering (it offsets the border-bottom of the th rows if I do that).

  • 4
    Use block element like <div> or add display: block; to the span style. Otherwise it will ignore any attempt to define its dimensions being inline element. – Shadow Wizard is Ear For You Jun 6 '13 at 11:33
  • I changed the span to a div and it's much the same... Do I need to do anything else? – Matt Roberts Jun 6 '13 at 11:35
  • 1
    Yeah, saw it. Working on more accurate answer. – Shadow Wizard is Ear For You Jun 6 '13 at 11:36
  • Check my answer: stackoverflow.com/a/16961534/2296407 I think the main problem is just to leave the padding for all set 15 and just reduce it on left and right in the row indicator. – Ms. Nobody Jun 6 '13 at 12:02
  • display: inline-block worked for me – Karthik Nagaraj Aug 10 '19 at 10:50
14

Should add overflow:auto to the span (and display:block of course)

<table>
   <tr>
      <td style="padding:0px;"><span style="height:100%; width:5px; background-color:pink;display:block;overflow:auto">&nbsp;</span></td>
      <td>Some content</td>
      <td>Some more content</td>
  </tr>
</table>
| improve this answer | |
  • Nice, can you explain why adding it makes such difference? – Shadow Wizard is Ear For You Jun 6 '13 at 11:40
  • jsfiddle.net/uKu3R/1 I think he wanted the cell padding 15px in the text cells and the span to be full height not with padding. – Ms. Nobody Jun 6 '13 at 11:46
  • @Ms.Nobody I think this is pretty much the same (or may I missed something). I'm trying to figure out why does this work, this is a really good question – Jaay Jun 6 '13 at 11:49
  • 1
    @Jaay I just put your solution in fiddle with the td padding so u can see that it's not actually working with that... :( and yeah good question.. I'm trying to figure it out too :D – Ms. Nobody Jun 6 '13 at 11:50
  • 2
    It might have worked in the past, but it doesn't work as expected if another cell is larger: jsfiddle.net/Metoule/4ar1pyhj – Métoule May 7 at 14:08
3

You don't need the <span> there. All you need is to set the right and left padding to 0 so your colored row indicator is only 5 pixels wide as u wanted and leave the top and bottom paddings 15 as in the other cells so the background color covers the whole height of cell/row.

HTML

  <table>
    <tr>
        <td class="rowindicator">&nbsp;</td>
        <td>Some content</td>
        <td>Some more content</td>
    </tr>
</table>

CSS

    table{background: yellow;}
    td{padding:15px;}
    .rowindicator{
         width:5px;                       
         padding-right:0px;  
         padding-left:0px;                       
         background-color:pink;
    }

Demo: http://jsfiddle.net/mNjsb/34/

| improve this answer | |
  • You don't need display:block... will work fine without it, also, you can just as well set padding to 0 since all the cells will scale to the same height, it is a table after all! – Marc Audet Jun 6 '13 at 12:12
  • @MarcAudet I think he wants the padding 15. And to have the whole row indicator heigh u have to let the padding top and bottom be there. As u can see here: jsfiddle.net/mNjsb/31 the padding:0 aint good if he wants it like this.. so.. I think my solution is ok. And yes the block isnt necessary. I just like to include load of code :D – Ms. Nobody Jun 6 '13 at 12:16
  • What I meant was that for .row, you can simply set padding to 0 and it still works... jsfiddle.net/audetwebdesign/mNjsb/32 – Marc Audet Jun 6 '13 at 12:19
  • I will update the code so we aren't misunderstood ok? @MarcAudet got any problems with my code now? if u have just read my previous comment once more ok?! :D – Ms. Nobody Jun 6 '13 at 12:20
  • No big deal, it works either way, just slightly more concise CSS. – Marc Audet Jun 6 '13 at 12:22
2

Maybe I am missing something here but if you are just using the span element to provide the colour for the cell why not just set the background colour of the cell to pink?

<html>
<head>
<style>
td {padding:15px;}
table {background-color: yellow;}
</style>
</head>
<body>
<table>
    <tr>
        <td style="padding:0px;width:5px; background-color:pink">&nbsp;</td>
        <td>Some content</td>
        <td>Some more content</td>
    </tr>
</table>
</body>
</html>
| improve this answer | |
0

For some odd reason adding the padding to the table cell cause the 100% height to "break".

Way around this is to add "dummy height" to the table cells:

td {padding:15px; height: 5px;}

This of course in addition to using block element:

<div style="height:100%; width:5px; background-color:pink;">&nbsp;</div>

Live test case.

| improve this answer | |
0

What you're doing isn't correct. It's not considered a best practice to add elements solely for styling purposes, especially when those elements are empty. consider removing the first td and doing this instead:

td:first-child{
    border-left:4px solid pink
}

here's a jsfiddle: http://jsfiddle.net/mNjsb/16/

edit: but if you insist on doing this, span is an inline element. that means you need to add

display: inline-block

if you want to style it with height and whatnot

| improve this answer | |
  • It depends in part on what else might go along with the indicator bar, maybe an edit or link button? Think of a spreadsheet application... but the border-left works independently of the cell padding, so that is a good idea. – Marc Audet Jun 6 '13 at 12:05
  • @MarcAudet, yea it's possible @Matt would put something else in the leading td, and i shouldn't have assumed otherwise, but in my experience when people resort to &nbsp; in an otherwise empty element, it's because they're trying to force the html into doing something it wasn't intended to do. My thinking was that since Matt put place holder text in the other cells, why would the leading cell be different unless he intended it to stay with the whitespace char. – skzryzg Jun 6 '13 at 12:45
  • Fair enough, in the absence of more information, I would agree with your interpretation, the simpler mark-up/CSS is usually preferable. – Marc Audet Jun 6 '13 at 13:03
  • I hold my hands up - you're right, I don't need anything else in there, the &nbsp; is there to force the html to do something – Matt Roberts Jun 6 '13 at 13:35
  • hehe, i believe we've all been there :) html is often counter-intuitive, bordering on illogical sometimes. I hope I didn't come off as dickish. that wasn't my intent. – skzryzg Jun 6 '13 at 14:06
0

span is inline element so to take full height you need to add display: block; or otherwise need to use block level element <div>

| improve this answer | |
0
span{
    display: inline-block;
    margin: 0;
}

This will work.

| improve this answer | |
0

I had the same problem. I tried various options.

I found a real solution here. It´s a trick but it REALLY Works.

table td{
    position: relative;
}

table td span{
    position:absolute;
    top:0;
    left:0;
    right:0;
    bottom:0;
}
| improve this answer | |

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