I tried next code (it shows similar results in Google Chrome and nodejs):

var t = new Array(200000); console.time('wtf'); for (var i = 0; i < 200000; ++i) {t.push(Math.random());} console.timeEnd('wtf');
wtf: 27839.499ms
undefined

I also runned next tests:

var t = []; console.time('wtf'); for (var i = 0; i < 400000; ++i) {t.push(Math.random());} console.timeEnd('wtf');
wtf: 449.948ms
undefined
var t = []; console.time('wtf'); for (var i = 0; i < 400000; ++i) {t.push(undefined);} console.timeEnd('wtf');
wtf: 406.710ms
undefined

But in Firefox all looks fine with the first variant:

>>> var t = new Array(200000); console.time('wtf'); ...{t.push(Math.random());} console.timeEnd('wtf');
wtf: 602ms

What happens in V8?

UPD * magically decreasing performance *

var t = new Array(99999); console.time('wtf'); for (var i = 0; i < 200000; ++i) {t.push(Math.random());} console.timeEnd('wtf');
wtf: 220.936ms
undefined
var t = new Array(100000); t[99999] = 1; console.time('wtf'); for (var i = 0; i < 200000; ++i) {t.push(Math.random());} console.timeEnd('wtf');
wtf: 1731.641ms
undefined
var t = new Array(100001); console.time('wtf'); for (var i = 0; i < 200000; ++i) {t.push(Math.random());} console.timeEnd('wtf');
wtf: 1703.336ms
undefined
var t = new Array(180000); console.time('wtf'); for (var i = 0; i < 200000; ++i) {t.push(Math.random());} console.timeEnd('wtf');
wtf: 1725.107ms
undefined
var t = new Array(181000); console.time('wtf'); for (var i = 0; i < 200000; ++i) {t.push(Math.random());} console.timeEnd('wtf');
wtf: 27587.669ms
undefined
  • Why do you want new Array(200000)? It doesn't do anything but set length. (It doesn't, for instance, pre-allocate any storage, because arrays aren't really arrays.) – T.J. Crowder Jun 6 '13 at 12:17
  • I wrote that code just for test. I wonder, why it shows so terrible performance. – yttrium Jun 6 '13 at 12:18
  • 8
    I've got to leave and have no time to answer, but the answer is simple. V8 falls back to sparse arrays in your first example, and optimizes to C like sequential memory arrays in your second. See code.google.com/p/v8/source/browse/trunk/src/array.js , – Benjamin Gruenbaum Jun 6 '13 at 12:18
  • And WHY it works like that, if it is doesn't do anything but set length? – yttrium Jun 6 '13 at 12:19
  • 1
    @yttrium I've had to leave (mobile now), but I've asked a friend from the JS room to answer this question. Don't worry you'll get an answer soon, it makes sense though. – Benjamin Gruenbaum Jun 6 '13 at 12:23
up vote 56 down vote accepted

If you preallocate, do not use .push because you will create a sparse array backed by a hashtable. You can preallocate sparse arrays up to 99999 elements which will be backed by a C array, after that it's a hashtable.

With the second array you are adding elements in a contiguous way starting from 0, so it will be backed by a real C array, not a hash table.

So roughly:

If your array indices go nicely from 0 to Length-1, with no holes, then it can be represented by a fast C array. If you have holes in your array, then it will be represented by a much slower hash table. The exception is that if you preallocate an array of size < 100000, then you can have holes in the array and still get backed by a C array:

var a = new Array(N); 

//If N < 100000, this will not make the array a hashtable:
a[50000] = "sparse";

var b = [] //Or new Array(N), with N >= 100000
//B will be backed by hash table
b[50000] = "Sparse";
//b.push("Sparse"), roughly same as above if you used new Array with N > 0
  • +1 I must upvote you as Benjamin is not here anymore (and you added more matter, too). – Denys Séguret Jun 6 '13 at 12:27
  • @dystroy I'm here, voting from mobile. Nice answer! How does the corresponding code in SpiderMonkey look? – Benjamin Gruenbaum Jun 6 '13 at 12:32
  • @BenjaminGruenbaum Couldn't say, I haven't looked at it ever. – Esailija Jun 6 '13 at 12:34
  • 5
    @Esailija Actually what you write is not entirely correct. ArrayPush built-in tries to keep elements in fast mode if they were in fast mode. See the logic in code.google.com/p/v8/source/browse/trunk/src/builtins.cc#547 – Vyacheslav Egorov Jun 6 '13 at 12:56
  • 3
    @yttrium the difference happens due to how heuristics for going back into fast mode from dictionary mode work. if your array is in dictionary mode then every time when it needs to grow V8 checks whether it is dense enough and whether it can win space by using a continuous (C-like) array instead of dictionary. With 180000 as starting point heuristics hit fast and with 181000 heuristic hits very late. Hence the difference. Heuristic is here: code.google.com/p/v8/source/browse/trunk/src/… – Vyacheslav Egorov Jun 6 '13 at 13:20

As you probably already know, if you pre-allocate an array with > 10000 elements in Chrome or Node (or more generally, in V8), they fall back to dictionary mode, making things uber-slow.

Thanks to some of the comments in this thread, I was able to track things down to object.h's kInitialMaxFastElementArray.

I then used that information to file an issue in the v8 repository which is now starting to gain some traction, but it will still take a while. And I quote:

I hope we'll be able to do this work eventually. But it's still probably a ways away.

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