194

I am having a problem binding radio buttons to an object whose properties have boolean values. I am trying to display exam questions retrieved from a $resource.

HTML:

<label data-ng-repeat="choice in question.choices">
  <input type="radio" name="response" data-ng-model="choice.isUserAnswer" value="true" />
  {{choice.text}}
</label>

JS:

$scope.question = {
    questionText: "This is a test question.",
    choices: [{
            id: 1,
            text: "Choice 1",
            isUserAnswer: false
        }, {
            id: 2,
            text: "Choice 2",
            isUserAnswer: true
        }, {
            id: 3,
            text: "Choice 3",
            isUserAnswer: false
        }]
};   

With this example object, the "isUserAnswer: true" property does not cause the radio button to be selected. If I encapsulate the boolean values in quotes, it works.

JS:

$scope.question = {
    questionText: "This is a test question.",
    choices: [{
            id: 1,
            text: "Choice 1",
            isUserAnswer: "false"
        }, {
            id: 2,
            text: "Choice 2",
            isUserAnswer: "true"
        }, {
            id: 3,
            text: "Choice 3",
            isUserAnswer: "false"
        }]
};   

Unfortunately my REST service treats that property as a boolean and it will be difficult to change the JSON serialization to encapsulate those values in quotes. Is there another way to set up the model binding without changing the structure of my model?

Here's the jsFiddle showing non-working and working objects

366

The correct approach in Angularjs is to use ng-value for non-string values of models.

Modify your code like this:

<label data-ng-repeat="choice in question.choices">
  <input type="radio" name="response" data-ng-model="choice.isUserAnswer" data-ng-value="true" />
  {{choice.text}}
</label>

Ref: Straight from the horse's mouth

  • 12
    just wanted to add an important side note: ng-value has to have the value without the curly braces {{}} Example: ng-value="choice2.id" vs value="{{choice2.id}}" – Andi Oct 21 '14 at 11:26
  • Yes, that is correct, as the ng-value is evaluated in that scope – kumar_harsh Oct 21 '14 at 13:49
  • @Andi thanks for this side note, it saved me some time debugging! – Roy Milder Oct 26 '14 at 14:24
  • 3
    You mean the data- prefix I think... The data- prefix is to make the HTML valid (although without that also all modern browsers handle the HTML correctly) – kumar_harsh Dec 19 '14 at 6:07
  • 5
    I know the post is quite old but I got the same problem now. But when I use your solution and change the radio buttons all that were once selected are true and they don't switch back to false. Is there a solution for this? (problem also exists in OP's Fiddle) – Dominik G Apr 16 '15 at 10:05
20

That's an odd approach with isUserAnswer. Are you really going to send all three choices back to the server where it will loop through each one checking for isUserAnswer == true? If so, you can try this:

http://jsfiddle.net/hgxjv/4/

HTML:

<input type="radio" name="response" value="true" ng-click="setChoiceForQuestion(question1, choice)"/>

JavaScript:

$scope.setChoiceForQuestion = function (q, c) {
    angular.forEach(q.choices, function (c) {
        c.isUserAnswer = false;
    });

    c.isUserAnswer = true;
};

Alternatively, I'd recommend changing your tack:

http://jsfiddle.net/hgxjv/5/

<input type="radio" name="response" value="{{choice.id}}" ng-model="question1.userChoiceId"/>

That way you can just send {{question1.userChoiceId}} back to the server.

  • Thanks for your response. I know your second solution is ideal; however, the app actually supports multiple types of questions, including "check all that apply" questions -- hence the reason for the value being stored on each choice. From what I can tell, your first solution works for updating the model after a selection is made, but not for displaying the model retrieved from the server with a selection already made. – peteallen Jun 6 '13 at 19:46
  • 2
    Ah, true. You can resolve that by using ngChecked, except you'll have to break away from using true/false as strings. Can you do that? jsfiddle.net/hgxjv/6 – Langdon Jun 6 '13 at 19:56
  • 3
    Yes, that works! I had tried using ngChecked before, but had not removed the ngModel attribute. It didn't work with that configuration, and I had assumed that it was because ngChecked wasn't compatible with radio buttons. Removing the ngModel attribute and using ngChecked and binding ngClick to your setChoiceForQuestion function achieves what I'm trying to do. Thank you for your help! – peteallen Jun 6 '13 at 21:33
10
 <label class="rate-hit">
     <input type="radio" ng-model="st.result" ng-value="true" ng-checked="st.result">
     Hit
 </label>
 &nbsp;&nbsp;
 <label class="rate-miss">
     <input type="radio" ng-model="st.result" ng-value="false" ng-checked="!st.result">
     Miss
 </label>
  • I think this only works because true evaluates to true. If your ng-value is a string, for example, and not a reference to something in $scope, you'll have to put that string in quotes. That was the case for me. – Jason Swett Feb 8 '17 at 21:51
  • This is the best answer for me! Thanks, Ronel! – Gisway Feb 27 '18 at 19:07
  • ng-checked isn't needed here as long as ng-model is defined – Nico Westerdale Jun 20 '18 at 21:43
7

I tried changing value="true" to ng-value="true", and it seems to work.

<input type="radio" name="response2" data-ng-model="choice.isUserAnswer" ng-value="true" />

Also, to get both inputs to work in your example, you'd have to give different name to each input -- e.g. response should become response1 and response2.

  • 1
    No, names can be the same. – kumar_harsh Aug 26 '13 at 16:53
1

You might take a look at this:

https://github.com/michaelmoussa/ng-boolean-radio/

This guy wrote a custom directive to get around the issue that "true" and "false" are strings, not booleans.

  • 8
    ng-value would have saved him a lot of work – rodmjay Dec 15 '13 at 0:55
0

The way your radios are set up in the fiddle - sharing the same model - will cause only the last group to show a checked radio if you decide to quote all of the truthy values. A more solid approach will involve giving the individual groups their own model, and set the value as a unique attribute of the radios, such as the id:

$scope.radioMod = 1;
$scope.radioMod2 = 2;

Here is a representation of the new html:

<label data-ng-repeat="choice2 in question2.choices">
            <input type="radio" name="response2" data-ng-model="radioMod2" value="{{choice2.id}}"/>
                {{choice2.text}}
        </label>

And a fiddle.

0

if you are using boolean variable to bind the radio button. please refer below sample code

<div ng-repeat="book in books"> 
<input type="radio" ng-checked="book.selected"  
ng-click="function($event)">                        
</div>

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.