57

Suppose I have the following code:

package main

import "fmt"

type Car struct{
    year int
    make string
}

func (c *Car)String() string{
    return fmt.Sprintf("{make:%s, year:%d}", c.make, c.year)
}

func main() {
    myCar := Car{year:1996, make:"Toyota"}
    fmt.Println(myCar)
}

When I call fmt.Println(myCar) and the object in question is a pointer, my String() method gets called properly. If, however the object is a value, my output is formatted using the default formatting built into Go and my code to format the said object is not called.

The interesting thing is in either case if I call myCar.String() manually it works properly whether my object is either a pointer or value.

How can I get my object formatted the way I want no matter if the object is value-based or pointer-based when used with Println?

I don't want to use a value method for String because then that means every time it's invoked the object is copied which seams unreasonable. And I don't want to have to always manually called .String() either because I'm trying to let the duck-typing system do it's work.

75

When calling fmt.Println, myCar is implicitly converted to a value of type interface{} as you can see from the function signature. The code from the fmt package then does a type switch to figure out how to print this value, looking something like this:

switch v := v.(type) {
case string:
    os.Stdout.WriteString(v)
case fmt.Stringer:
    os.Stdout.WriteString(v.String())
// ...
}

However, the fmt.Stringer case fails because Car doesn't implement String (as it is defined on *Car). Calling String manually works because the compiler sees that String needs a *Car and thus automatically converts myCar.String() to (&myCar).String(). For anything regarding interfaces, you have to do it manually. So you either have to implement String on Car or always pass a pointer to fmt.Println:

fmt.Println(&myCar)
2
  • I suppose it is also partly because the language won't give you a pointer to what is stored inside an interface value (since that address may end up representing a different type if something else is assigned to the interface). Jun 7 '13 at 10:53
  • @JamesHenstridge, why not to leave old value in a pointer in that case?
    – starius
    Jun 12 '16 at 17:05
27

Methods

Pointers vs. Values

The rule about pointers vs. values for receivers is that value methods can be invoked on pointers and values, but pointer methods can only be invoked on pointers. This is because pointer methods can modify the receiver; invoking them on a copy of the value would cause those modifications to be discarded.

Therefore, for your String method to work when invoked on both pointers and values, use a value receiver. For example,

package main

import "fmt"

type Car struct {
    year int
    make string
}

func (c Car) String() string {
    return fmt.Sprintf("{make:%s, year:%d}", c.make, c.year)
}

func main() {
    myCar := Car{year: 1996, make: "Toyota"}
    fmt.Println(myCar)
    fmt.Println(&myCar)
}

Output:

{make:Toyota, year:1996}
{make:Toyota, year:1996}
3
  • 19
    Does this basically mean that if i have a large struct, that every time it goes through Println It will be copied? Like I said in my post this seams unreasonable. Jun 7 '13 at 14:56
  • 4
    @RalphCaraveo No, the argument type is interface{} which contains type information and a pointer to the struct. The struct itself is not copied.
    – SnoProblem
    Mar 21 '18 at 5:19
  • @SnoProblem Isn't it the case that the struct is not going to be copied when passed on to the Println function however it is going to be copied when passed on to the func (c Car) String() string function?
    – begie
    Sep 2 '19 at 8:13
7

Define your fmt.Stringer on a pointer receiver:

package main

import "fmt"

type Car struct {
        year int
        make string
}

func (c *Car) String() string {
        return fmt.Sprintf("{maker:%s, produced:%d}", c.make, c.year)
}

func main() {
        myCar := Car{year: 1996, make: "Toyota"}
        myOtherCar := &Car{year: 2013, make: "Honda"}
        fmt.Println(&myCar)
        fmt.Println(myOtherCar)
}

Playground


Output:

{maker:Toyota, produced:1996}
{maker:Honda, produced:2013}    

Then, always pass a pointer to instances of Car to fmt.Println. This way a potentially expensive value copy is avoided under your control.

6

The OP further asked:

OP: [when a value receiver is used] "Does this basically mean that if I have a large struct, then every time it goes through Println it will be copied?"

The following experiment is evidence that the answer is "yes" (when a value receiver is used). Note that the String() method increments the year in this experiment, and check how this affects the printed output.

type Car struct {
    year int
    make string
}

func (c Car) String() string {
    s := fmt.Sprintf("{ptr:%p, make:%s, year:%d}", c, c.make, c.year)
    // increment the year to prove: is c a copy or a reference?
    c.year += 1
    return s
}

func main() {
    myCar := Car{year: 1996, make: "Toyota"}
    fmt.Println(&myCar)
    fmt.Println(&myCar)
    fmt.Println(myCar)
    fmt.Println(myCar)
}

With a value receiver (c Car), the following printed output shows that Go makes value copies of the Car struct, because the year increment is not reflected in subsequent calls to Println:

{ptr:%!p(main.Car={1996 Toyota}), make:Toyota, year:1996}
{ptr:%!p(main.Car={1996 Toyota}), make:Toyota, year:1996}
{ptr:%!p(main.Car={1996 Toyota}), make:Toyota, year:1996}
{ptr:%!p(main.Car={1996 Toyota}), make:Toyota, year:1996}

Changing the receiver to a pointer (c *Car) but changing nothing else, the printed output becomes:

{ptr:0xc420094020, make:Toyota, year:1996}
{ptr:0xc420094020, make:Toyota, year:1997}
{1998 Toyota}
{1998 Toyota}

Even when a pointer is provided as argument in a call to Println, i.e. fmt.Println(&myCar), Go still makes a value copy of the Car struct when a value receiver is used. The OP wants to avoid value copies being made, and my conclusion is that only pointer receivers satisfy that requirement.

0

It's only related to implementation of fmt instead of Go however.

String() with pointer receiver would be invoked by https://github.com/davecgh/go-spew since spew print things in this way:

v = reflect.ValueOf(arg)

...

switch iface := v.Interface().(type) {
    case fmt.Stringer:
        defer catchPanic(w, v)
        if cs.ContinueOnMethod {
            w.Write(openParenBytes)
            w.Write([]byte(iface.String()))
            w.Write(closeParenBytes)
            w.Write(spaceBytes)
            return false
        }
        w.Write([]byte(iface.String()))
        return true
    }
-2

Generally speaking, it's best to avoid assigning values to variables via static initializers, i.e.

f := Foo{bar:1,baz:"2"}

This is because it can create exactly the complaint you're talking about, if you forget to pass foo as a pointer via &foo or you decide to use value receivers you end up making a lot of clones of your values.

Instead, try to assign pointers to static initializers by default, i.e.

f := &Foo{bar:1,baz:"2"}

This way f will always be a pointer and the only time you'll get a value copy is if you explicitly use value receivers.

(There are of course times when you want to store the value from a static initializer, but those should be edge cases)

0

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