32

I am unable to remove the duplicates from collection , i have implemented IEqualityComparer for the class Employee still i am not getting the output

static void Main(string[] args)
    {
        List<Employe> Employeecollection = new List<Employe>();

        Employeecollection.Add(new Employe("abc","def"));
        Employeecollection.Add(new Employe("lmn","def"));
        Employeecollection.Add(new Employe("abc", "def"));

        IEnumerable<Employe> coll = Employeecollection.Distinct(new Employe());

        foreach (Employe item in coll)
        {
            Console.WriteLine(item.fName + "   " + item.lName );
        }

    }

The Below is the Employee class implementation , here i implemented IEqualityComparer

class Employe : IEqualityComparer<Employe>
{
    public string fName { get; set; }
    public string lName { get; set; }

    public Employe()
    {

    }

    public Employe(string firstName, string LastName)
    {
        this.fName = firstName;
        this.lName = LastName;
    }

    #region IEqualityComparer<pcf> Members

    public bool Equals(Employe x, Employe y)
    {
        if (x.fName == y.fName && x.lName == y.lName)
        {
            return true;
        }

        return false;
    }

    public int GetHashCode(Employe obj)
    {
        return obj.GetHashCode();
    }

    #endregion
}
94

Forget IEqualityComparer and just use Linq directly:

EmployeeCollection.GroupBy(x => new{x.fName, x.lName}).Select(g => g.First());
  • Can u please explain the above one i understand GroupBy but what is Select(g => g.First() – Gun Jun 7 '13 at 12:22
  • 6
    The GroupBy operation will return you an IEnumerable of IGrouping items (which are IEnumerables as well). In the case of your example, there will be two items in the outer IEnumerable: one IGrouping with two entries for each "abc", "def"; another IGrouping with one entry for "lmn", "def". The First() operator will take the first item out of the inner IGrouping IEnumerables. – avanek Jun 7 '13 at 12:46
  • for logic with multiple properties, you have to group on all properties which will run slower than the xor comparison. – Nikola Mitev Jun 7 '13 at 14:54
  • @NikolaMitev: Using XOR to calculate hashes can cause collisions when hashing over values that have a small range such as enums. While collisions don't affect the correctness of hash-table-like operations, they make them more expensive. The c# compiler automatically writes a much better implementation of GetHashCode for anonymous objects that is considerably less likely to collide. I'd argue that while using XOR might be computationally cheap, a better implementation is also very light on computation and will have benefits beyond the calculation of the the hash code. – spender Oct 6 '13 at 10:54
  • @NikolaMitev: Actual comparison of properties will only occur when there are collisions in the collection that is hashed. GroupBy still uses hashes in the same way as Distinct. I think your comment above is misleading. – spender Oct 6 '13 at 11:01
5

Here is a good tutorial

    public int GetHashCode(Employe obj)
    {
        return obj.fname.GetHashCode() ^ obj.lname.GetHashCode();
    }
  • 4
    You should never implement GetHashCode without also implementing equality members. GetHashCode should also be an override. Also worth remembering that "'xor' can create or exacerbate distribution problems when there is redundancy in data structures." : blogs.msdn.com/b/ericlippert/archive/2011/02/28/… – spender Oct 6 '13 at 10:55
4

You need to override GetHashCode method in your Employee. You haven't done this. One example of a good hashing method is given below: (generated By ReSharper)

public override int GetHashCode()
{
    return ((this.fName != null ? this.fName.GetHashCode() : 0) * 397) ^ (this.lName != null ? this.lName.GetHashCode() : 0);
}

now after Distinct is called, foreach loop prints:

abc   def
lmn   def

In your case you are calling object's class GetHashCode, which knows nothing about internal fields.

One simple note, MoreLINQ contains DistinctBy extension method, which allows you to do:

IEnumerable<Employe> coll = 
 Employeecollection.DistinctBy(employee => new {employee.fName, employee.lName});

Anonymous objects have correct implementation for both GetHashCode and Equals methods.

2

The hashcode implementation is not correct:

public override int GetHashCode()
{
    return 13 * fName.GetHashCode() + 7 * lName.GetHashCode();
}
  • 1
    is it ok to receive NullReferenceException in GetHashCode, when one of the objects fields is null? – Ilya Ivanov Jun 7 '13 at 12:11
  • It definitely isn't - I just thought I could clarify that "hashcodes should be same when equals are same" fact, than focus on the null checks. But yes, you're right. – aquaraga Jun 7 '13 at 12:13
0

Also it looks like your comparing by reference instead of content, hence the compare function doesn't work.

change it to use .Equals() instead of == and it should work. example below:

#region IEqualityComparer<pcf> Members

public bool Equals(Employe x, Employe y)
{
    if (x.fName.Equals(y.fName) && x.lName.Equals(y.lName))
    {
        return true;
    }

    return false;
}

public int GetHashCode(Employe obj)
{
    return obj.GetHashCode();
}

#endregion
  • 1
    The == operator works just fine for strings in c#. The problem is in the GetHashCode() implementation. – Fredrik May 25 '16 at 22:16
-1
public int GetHashCode(Employe obj)
{
    return obj.GetHashCode();
}

For this method, return a hashcode of the properties that you are comparing for equality, instead of the object itself. Comparing the hashcode of the objects will always be false, so your list will never be filtered for duplicates.

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