99

I am trying to translate every element of a numpy.array according to a given key:

For example:

a = np.array([[1,2,3],
              [3,2,4]])

my_dict = {1:23, 2:34, 3:36, 4:45}

I want to get:

array([[ 23.,  34.,  36.],
       [ 36.,  34.,  45.]])

I can see how to do it with a loop:

def loop_translate(a, my_dict):
    new_a = np.empty(a.shape)
    for i,row in enumerate(a):
        new_a[i,:] = map(my_dict.get, row)
    return new_a

Is there a more efficient and/or pure numpy way?

Edit:

I timed it, and np.vectorize method proposed by DSM is considerably faster for larger arrays:

In [13]: def loop_translate(a, my_dict):
   ....:     new_a = np.empty(a.shape)
   ....:     for i,row in enumerate(a):
   ....:         new_a[i,:] = map(my_dict.get, row)
   ....:     return new_a
   ....: 

In [14]: def vec_translate(a, my_dict):    
   ....:     return np.vectorize(my_dict.__getitem__)(a)
   ....: 

In [15]: a = np.random.randint(1,5, (4,5))

In [16]: a
Out[16]: 
array([[2, 4, 3, 1, 1],
       [2, 4, 3, 2, 4],
       [4, 2, 1, 3, 1],
       [2, 4, 3, 4, 1]])

In [17]: %timeit loop_translate(a, my_dict)
10000 loops, best of 3: 77.9 us per loop

In [18]: %timeit vec_translate(a, my_dict)
10000 loops, best of 3: 70.5 us per loop

In [19]: a = np.random.randint(1, 5, (500,500))

In [20]: %timeit loop_translate(a, my_dict)
1 loops, best of 3: 298 ms per loop

In [21]: %timeit vec_translate(a, my_dict)
10 loops, best of 3: 37.6 ms per loop

In [22]:  %timeit loop_translate(a, my_dict)
3

6 Answers 6

129

I don't know about efficient, but you could use np.vectorize on the .get method of dictionaries:

>>> a = np.array([[1,2,3],
              [3,2,4]])
>>> my_dict = {1:23, 2:34, 3:36, 4:45}
>>> np.vectorize(my_dict.get)(a)
array([[23, 34, 36],
       [36, 34, 45]])
6
  • 8
    +1 if OP knows every key will be contained in my_dict as in a, then my_dict.__getitem__ would be a better choice
    – jamylak
    Jun 7, 2013 at 20:59
  • @Akavall: that's strange. I don't have 1.6.2 around at the moment to check, though.
    – DSM
    Jun 7, 2013 at 21:14
  • When I am using my_dict.get I am getting a ValueError, but I don't have that problem when I am using my_dict.__getitem__. I am using numpy 1.6.2
    – Akavall
    Jun 7, 2013 at 21:18
  • @Akavall Using this sample data? If not do you notice any difference with your input data?
    – jamylak
    Jun 7, 2013 at 21:23
  • @jamylak, I am using the same data.
    – Akavall
    Jun 7, 2013 at 21:29
24

Here's another approach, using numpy.unique:

>>> a = np.array([[1,2,3],[3,2,1]])
>>> a
array([[1, 2, 3],
       [3, 2, 1]])
>>> d = {1 : 11, 2 : 22, 3 : 33}
>>> u,inv = np.unique(a,return_inverse = True)
>>> np.array([d[x] for x in u])[inv].reshape(a.shape)
array([[11, 22, 33],
       [33, 22, 11]])

This approach is much faster than np.vectorize approach when the number of unique elements in array is small. Explanaion: Python is slow, in this approach the in-python loop is used to convert unique elements, afterwards we rely on extremely optimized numpy indexing operation (done in C) to do the mapping. Hence, if the number of unique elements is comparable to the overall size of the array then there will be no speedup. On the other hand, if there is just a few unique elements, then you can observe a speedup of up to x100.

4
  • 1
    How does this compare speed-wise to using vectorize(dict.get)? May 5, 2016 at 20:34
  • 1
    addendum - i found this one to be the fastest (compared to vectoring dictionary.get and iterating through keys)! ymmv... May 5, 2016 at 20:54
  • 1
    I would make one minor modification, which is to replace d[x] with d.get(x, default_value), where default_value can be whatever you want. For my use case, I was only replacing some values, and others I wanted to leave alone, so I did d.get(x, x). May 5, 2016 at 20:56
  • 2
    This was really a genius solution. I used it to color a grayscale image (here a) with a dict mapping the 1d pixel values into rgb colors with a look-up dict (here d). I tried numpy.vectorize and pandas.DataFrame.apply (that was btw faster than vectorize), but this was the fastest. Thanks!
    – mjkvaak
    Feb 11, 2021 at 10:39
10

I think it'd be better to iterate over the dictionary, and set values in all the rows and columns "at once":

>>> a = np.array([[1,2,3],[3,2,1]])
>>> a
array([[1, 2, 3],
       [3, 2, 1]])
>>> d = {1 : 11, 2 : 22, 3 : 33}
>>> for k,v in d.iteritems():
...     a[a == k] = v
... 
>>> a
array([[11, 22, 33],
       [33, 22, 11]])

Edit:

While it may not be as sexy as DSM's (really good) answer using numpy.vectorize, my tests of all the proposed methods show that this approach (using @jamylak's suggestion) is actually a bit faster:

from __future__ import division
import numpy as np
a = np.random.randint(1, 5, (500,500))
d = {1 : 11, 2 : 22, 3 : 33, 4 : 44}

def unique_translate(a,d):
    u,inv = np.unique(a,return_inverse = True)
    return np.array([d[x] for x in u])[inv].reshape(a.shape)

def vec_translate(a, d):    
    return np.vectorize(d.__getitem__)(a)

def loop_translate(a,d):
    n = np.ndarray(a.shape)
    for k in d:
        n[a == k] = d[k]
    return n

def orig_translate(a, d):
    new_a = np.empty(a.shape)
    for i,row in enumerate(a):
        new_a[i,:] = map(d.get, row)
    return new_a


if __name__ == '__main__':
    import timeit
    n_exec = 100
    print 'orig'
    print timeit.timeit("orig_translate(a,d)", 
                        setup="from __main__ import np,a,d,orig_translate",
                        number = n_exec) / n_exec
    print 'unique'
    print timeit.timeit("unique_translate(a,d)", 
                        setup="from __main__ import np,a,d,unique_translate",
                        number = n_exec) / n_exec
    print 'vec'
    print timeit.timeit("vec_translate(a,d)",
                        setup="from __main__ import np,a,d,vec_translate",
                        number = n_exec) / n_exec
    print 'loop'
    print timeit.timeit("loop_translate(a,d)",
                        setup="from __main__ import np,a,d,loop_translate",
                        number = n_exec) / n_exec

Outputs:

orig
0.222067718506
unique
0.0472617006302
vec
0.0357889199257
loop
0.0285375618935
4
  • Considering speed may be an issue, iterating like for k in d would make this as fast as possible`
    – jamylak
    Jun 7, 2013 at 21:07
  • 4
    I find that vectorizing is faster for my situation, where a has shape (50, 50, 50), d has 5000 keys, and data are numpy.uint32. And it's not super close... ~0.1 seconds vs ~1.4 seconds. flattening the array doesn't help. :/ May 5, 2016 at 20:44
  • 4
    How fast this method is, depends on how many unique keys exist in the mapping. In your case the number of keys is much smaller than the dimensions of the 2D array, that's why the performance is close to the vectorized solution. Vectorized becomes much faster if the number of keys becomes comparable to the dimensions of the array.
    – Ataxias
    Aug 10, 2018 at 2:50
  • A big, and sometimes overlooked (just as I did) caveat: if any of your dict values and keys matches (e.g. {1:2, 2:3} ), elements with the value 1 are replaced with 2, then they become 3 - so 1 and 2 both translate to 3. Cautiously reordering the itarator before feeding it to for might help, but to no avail if the dict forms a circular graph.
    – yumemio
    Feb 8 at 11:45
8

The numpy_indexed package (disclaimer: I am its author) provides an elegant and efficient vectorized solution to this type of problem:

import numpy_indexed as npi
remapped_a = npi.remap(a, list(my_dict.keys()), list(my_dict.values()))

The method implemented is similar to the approach mentioned by John Vinyard, but even more general. For instance, the items of the array do not need to be ints, but can be any type, even nd-subarrays themselves.

If you set the optional 'missing' kwarg to 'raise' (default is 'ignore'), performance will be slightly better, and you will get a KeyError if not all elements of 'a' are present in the keys.

1
  • This gives me TypeError: invalid type promotion. Perhaps one has to first reshape a to be one dimensional? Jan 11, 2021 at 12:37
4

Assuming your dict keys are positive integers, without huge gaps (similar to a range from 0 to N), you would be better off converting your translation dict to an array such that my_array[i] = my_dict[i], and using numpy indexing to do the translation.

A code using this approach is:

def direct_translate(a, d):
    src, values = d.keys(), d.values()
    d_array = np.arange(a.max() + 1)
    d_array[src] = values
    return d_array[a]

Testing with random arrays:

N = 10000
shape = (5000, 5000)
a = np.random.randint(N, size=shape)
my_dict = dict(zip(np.arange(N), np.random.randint(N, size=N)))

For these sizes I get around 140 ms for this approach. The np.get vectorization takes around 5.8 s and the unique_translate around 8 s.

Possible generalizations:

  • If you have negative values to translate, you could shift the values in a and in the keys of the dictionary by a constant to map them back to positive integers:

def direct_translate(a, d): # handles negative source keys
    min_a = a.min()
    src, values = np.array(d.keys()) - min_a, d.values()
    d_array = np.arange(a.max() - min_a + 1)
    d_array[src] = values
    return d_array[a - min_a]
  • If the source keys have huge gaps, the initial array creation would waste memory. I would resort to cython to speed up that function.
2

If you don't really have to use dictionary as substitution table, simple solution would be (for your example):

a = numpy.array([your array])
my_dict = numpy.array([0, 23, 34, 36, 45])     # your dictionary as array

def Sub (myarr, table) :
    return table[myarr] 

values = Sub(a, my_dict)

This will work of course only if indexes of d cover all possible values of your a, in other words, only for a with usigned integers.

2
  • Of course! Much simpler and easily overlooked clever solution. Jul 30, 2020 at 16:32
  • 1
    Isn't this just: a = np.array(); b = np.array(); c = a[b]. You're assuming that the values of b are the indexes of a, which means you don't need a dictionary at all. A trivial case of this problem. Jan 9, 2021 at 16:05

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