4

this is an algorithmic playground for me! I've seen variations of this problem tackling maximum consecutive subsequence but this is another variation as well. the formal def: given A[1..n] find i and j so that abs(A[i]+A[i+1]+...+A[j]) is closest to zero among others.

I'm wondering how to get O(n log^2 n), or even O(n log n) solution.

  • I think you are looking for a minimum distance between a negative and a positive numbers, start by looking at i=j; you compare them with 0 itself – Khaled.K Jun 8 '13 at 5:46
  • deleted from cs site as soon as i got the answer! tanx mentioning! – scitosci Jun 8 '13 at 15:52
5
  1. Calculate the cumulative sum.
  2. Sort it.
  3. Find the sequential pair with least difference.
function leastSubsequenceSum(values) {
    var n = values.length;

    // Store the cumulative sum along with the index.
    var sums = [];
    sums[0] = { index: 0, sum: 0 };
    for (var i = 1; i <= n; i++) {
        sums[i] = {
            index: i,
            sum: sums[i-1].sum + values[i-1]
        };
    }

    // Sort by cumulative sum
    sums.sort(function (a, b) {
        return a.sum == b.sum ? b.index - a.index : a.sum - b.sum;
    });

    // Find the sequential pair with the least difference.
    var bestI = -1;
    var bestDiff = null;
    for (var i = 1; i <= n; i++) {
        var diff = Math.abs(sums[i-1].sum - sums[i].sum);
        if (bestDiff === null || diff < bestDiff) {
            bestDiff = diff;
            bestI = i;
        }
    }

    // Just to make sure start < stop
    var start = sums[bestI-1].index;
    var stop = sums[bestI].index;
    if (start > stop) {
        var tmp = start;
        start = stop;
        stop = tmp;
    }

    return [start, stop-1, bestDiff];
}

Examples:

>>> leastSubsequenceSum([10, -5, 3, -4, 11, -4, 12, 20]);
[2, 3, 1]

>>> leastSubsequenceSum([5, 6, -1, -9, -2, 16, 19, 1, -4, 9]);
[0, 4, 1]

>>> leastSubsequenceSum([3, 16, 8, -10, -1, -8, -3, 10, -2, -4]);
[6, 9, 1]

In the first example, [2, 3, 1] means, sum from index 2 to 3 (inclusive), and you get an absolute sum of 1:

[10, -5, 3, -4, 11, -4, 12, 20]
         ^^^^^
  • that's awesome js code so tanx! is there any other design approaches like using AVL trees?! i've heard it is possible, i really like to know how. – scitosci Jun 8 '13 at 15:48
  • I don't know. If so, that would just be more complicated to implement, and it wouldn't gain you anything in terms of speed or memory. – Markus Jarderot Jun 8 '13 at 16:04

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