3

Let A be a block circulant matrix with circulant blocks (i.e a BCCB matrix):

A = [1 2 3 4
     2 1 4 3
     3 4 1 2
     4 3 2 1]

that is:

 A = [C1 C2
      C2 C1]

where each block (C1, C2) is a circulant matrix. I've read (see here) that BCCB can be diagonalized by following the equation: A =F*·D·F where F is the 2-D discrete Fourier transform matrix, F* is the conjugate of F, and D is a diagonal matrix whose entries are the eigenvalues of A.

In MATLAB I use this code:

(conj(dftmtx(4))/16*(fft2(A))*dftmtx(4))

but the result is:

[1 4 3 2
 2 3 4 1
 3 2 1 4
 4 1 2 3]

Here the second and the fourth columns of A are switched. Where is the error?

  • Your implementation doesn't seem to match the definition. Where's d coming from, and why did you apply fft2 to it? Also, my intuition says to me that F* is supposed to be the complex conjugate transpose matrix, not just the complex conjugate. – Eitan T Jun 9 '13 at 8:51
  • Yes, you are right. It is not d, but A. – no_name Jun 9 '13 at 9:06
  • Can you address the rest of my comment? – Eitan T Jun 9 '13 at 9:07
  • For a circulant matrix a=[4 1 0; 0 4 1; 1 0 4] I use: conj(dftmtx(3))/3*(diag(fft(a(:,1))))*(dftmtx(3)), since the fft of the first column of a circulant matrix gives the eigenvalues of the circulant matrix. – no_name Jun 9 '13 at 9:10
  • That doesn't really answer anything. Anywya, can you link to the article where you've read about this diagonalization process? – Eitan T Jun 9 '13 at 9:13
5

Your source is a bit misleading. Diagonalizing a BCCB matrix with DFT is done as follows:

A = (FM⊗FN)*D(FM⊗FN)

where FN is the N-point DFT matrix, M is the number of Cj blocks and N is the size of each individual block (in your example M=2 and N=2). The "⊗" symbol denotes the tensor product.

Also note that F* = conj(F)T (F* is called the complex conjugate transpose matrix). In MATLAB it translates to F' instead of conj(F). Coincidentally, the DFT matrix F is symmetric, which means that F* = conj(F) is also true.

I'm not sure what you are trying to compute, but here's how the diagonalization of A is done in MATLAB:

M = 2; N = 2;
FF = kron(dftmtx(M), dftmtx(N)); %// Tensor product
D = FF' * A * FF / size(A, 1);   %// ' is the conjugate transpose operator

which yields:

D =
    10    0    0    0
     0   -2    0    0
     0    0   -4    0
     0    0    0    0

To diagonalize A using only 2-D FFT operations, you can do this instead:

c = reshape(A(:, 1), N, []);     %// First column of each block
X = fft2(c);
D = diag(X(:));  

or in a one-liner:

D = diag(reshape(fft2(reshape(A(:, 1), N, [])), [], 1));

All of these produce the same diagonal matrix D.

Hope this clarifies things for you!

  • Nice. Your second solution is of course exactly what was described in the PDF slides. – horchler Jun 9 '13 at 20:28
  • 1
    Very clear explanation. Thank you. Another question: what about multilevel circular matrix? That is, if we have a BCCB matrix where each block is a BCCB matrix, is it possible to generalize the diagonalization, and if yes, how? – no_name Jun 11 '13 at 12:38
  • @no_name Unfortunately, I'm not aware of such generalization. Perhaps you can get more insights by posting a new question on math.stackexchange.com... – Eitan T Jun 11 '13 at 12:51
  • Maybe I found an answer here. Take a look at page 102. What do you think? – no_name Jun 11 '13 at 13:30

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