21

Consider this snippet:

class X;

void MoveAppend(vector<X>& src, vector<X>& dst) {
   dst.reserve(dst.size() + src.size());
   for (const X& x : src) dst.push_back(x);
   src.clear();
}

If we assume that class X implements move semantics, how can I efficiently implement MoveAppend?

38

Just do:

#include <iterator>
#include <algorithm>

// ...

void MoveAppend(std::vector<X>& src, std::vector<X>& dst) 
{
    if (dst.empty())
    {
        dst = std::move(src);
    }
    else
    {
        dst.reserve(dst.size() + src.size());
        std::move(std::begin(src), std::end(src), std::back_inserter(dst));
        src.clear();
    }
}

If dst is empty, a move-assignment from src to dst will do the job - that will be as cheap as it can be, just "stealing" the array encapsulated by src so that dst will point to it afterwards.

If dst is not empty, elements appended to dst will be move-constructed from elements in src. After the call to std::move(), src will not be empty - it will contain "zombie" moved-from elements. That's why the call to clear() is still necessary.

  • 1
    @ŁukaszLew: I changed the answer. Sorry for the misunderstanding – Andy Prowl Jun 9 '13 at 13:33
  • 1
    @ŁukaszLew: Is it guaranteed to not be empty? If it can possibly be empty, it might be a good idea to check that first. Then you can still do a simple move of the whole container, which will possibly be a lot cheaper. – Benjamin Lindley Jun 9 '13 at 13:34
  • can you explain why this is better than dst.insert(end(dst), begin(src), end(src))? – TemplateRex Jun 9 '13 at 15:46
  • @TemplateRex: That would copy-construct the new elements of dst from the corresponding elements of src. What the OP wants is moving – Andy Prowl Jun 9 '13 at 15:57
  • But in practice, the ranged-insert avoid multiple push_back() and reallocation of capacity() calls, whereas the std::back_inserter() doesn't (unless preceded by a reserve(). So it's not clear if the move is even faster than the ranged-insert. – TemplateRex Jun 9 '13 at 16:30
15

I would slightly prefer this to the accepted answer:

#include <vector>
#include <iterator>
#include <utility>

template <typename T>
typename std::vector<T>::iterator append(const std::vector<T>& src, std::vector<T>& dest)
{
    typename std::vector<T>::iterator result;

    if (dest.empty()) {
        dest = src;
        result = std::begin(dest);
    } else {
        result = dest.insert(std::end(dest), std::cbegin(src), std::cend(src));
    }

    return result;
}

template <typename T>
typename std::vector<T>::iterator append(std::vector<T>&& src, std::vector<T>& dest)
{
    typename std::vector<T>::iterator result;

    if (dest.empty()) {
        dest = std::move(src);
        result = std::begin(dest);
    } else {
        result = dest.insert(std::end(dest),
                             std::make_move_iterator(std::begin(src)),
                             std::make_move_iterator(std::end(src)));
    }

    src.clear();
    src.shrink_to_fit();

    return result;
}

Example:

#include <string>
#include <algorithm>
#include <iostream>

int main()
{
    const std::vector<std::string> v1 {"world", "!"};

    std::vector<std::string> v2 {" "}, v3 {"hello"}, v4 {};

    append(v1, v2); // copies
    append(std::move(v2), v3); // moves
    append(std::move(v3), v4); // moves

    std::copy(std::cbegin(v4), std::cend(v4), std::ostream_iterator<std::string> {std::cout});
    std::cout << std::endl;
}
  • I think this is a much better answer, has overloads for lvalue and rvalue source, and uses std::vector::insert(). – dats Aug 2 '16 at 8:29
  • 2
    Why do you "clean" the rvalue source? I think that is doing unsolicited extra work. – dats Aug 2 '16 at 8:30
  • @dats It's an interesting point - my view is that the caller would expect the capacity of the rvalue source to be zero after the call, which would not be the case otherwise. – Daniel Aug 2 '16 at 9:46
  • 4
    @Daniel caller shouldn't expect anything about the state of moved object. moved object is considered invalidated and should not be used in any way. – grisevg Sep 28 '16 at 14:25
  • 2
    there shouldn't be 2 versions of this function. The source should be passed by value, not by const ref or by rvalue. If you pass the source by value, the caller can decide wether to move or copy. – mfnx Dec 10 '18 at 17:04
2

Just trying to improve slightly the answer of @Daniel: the function should not be defined twice, the source should be passed by value.

// std::vector<T>&& src - src MUST be an rvalue reference
// std::vector<T> src - src MUST NOT, but MAY be an rvalue reference
template <typename T>
inline void append(std::vector<T> source, std::vector<T>& destination)
{
    if (destination.empty())
        destination = std::move(source);
    else
        destination.insert(std::end(destination),
                   std::make_move_iterator(std::begin(source)),
                   std::make_move_iterator(std::end(source)));
}

Now the caller can decide whether to copy or move.

std::vector<int> source {1,2,3,4,5};
std::vector<int> destination {0};
auto v1 = append<int>(source,destination); // copied once
auto v2 = append<int>(std::move(source),destination); // copied 0 times!!

Never use && for arguments, unless you have to (for example: std::ifstream&&).

  • 1
    destiny is an interesting pick of name! – Lightness Races BY-SA 3.0 Dec 10 '18 at 17:36
  • I quite liked it! – Lightness Races BY-SA 3.0 Dec 11 '18 at 10:45
  • 1
    In this case there are two vector memory allocations: one to copy source and a second to extend the size of destination. If we specialize append function on const& and && (as in Daniel's answer) then we only do one vector memory allocation, to extend the size of destination – William Apr 10 '19 at 19:10
  • @William No, not having && doesn't mean the lvalue source cannot be a reference to an rvalue. When I move the source, there is no memory allocation. – mfnx Apr 10 '19 at 19:19
  • 1
    @MFnx what I've been trying to say is that in the case the caller wants to copy, having the function take the vector by value means 2 vector allocations, whereas taking the vector by const& means only 1 vector allocation. Hope this is clear now :) – William Apr 10 '19 at 23:02

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