305

How do you check that an element is in a set?

Is there a simpler equivalent of the following code:

myset.find(x) != myset.end()
  • 4
    The only way to get simpler than that would be a boolean predicate: template <typename T> bool member(T const &item). And that would be implemented (under the covers) in terms of the line you are asking about. – Don Wakefield Nov 9 '09 at 16:53

10 Answers 10

373

The typical way to check for existence in many STL containers is:

const bool is_in = container.find(element) != container.end();
  • 19
    this is specific for sets and maps. vectors, lists etc. don't have a find member function. – wilhelmtell Nov 9 '09 at 13:53
  • 6
    IMO using count() is better because it is simply shorter and it converts to bool as noted in the answer by Pieter. I don't understand why this answer got accepted and so many points... – Огњен Шобајић Mar 27 '15 at 6:08
  • 4
    For the sake of completeness: vectors/lists can use std::find: std::find(container.begin(), container.end(), element) != container.end(); O(N) problem remains, of course... – Aconcagua Dec 1 '16 at 14:15
  • 8
    @MichaelMathews With your variant: if(container.find(foo) == container.end()) needs to do a tree lookup to find the element first - if not found, then you need to do a second tree lookup to find the correct insertion location. The original variant if(container.insert(foo).second) {...} has the charm that it needs just one single tree lookup... – Aconcagua Dec 1 '16 at 14:20
  • 17
    there is a set.contains(x) that returns a bool in the C++ 20 standard. I don't know why it's taken us until 2020 to get that in. – gremwell Aug 24 '18 at 6:33
198

Another way of simply telling if an element exists is to check the count()

if (myset.count(x)) {
   // x is in the set, count is 1
} else {
   // count zero, i.e. x not in the set
}

Most of the times, however, I find myself needing access to the element wherever I check for its existence.

So I'd have to find the iterator anyway. Then, of course, it's better to simply compare it to end too.

set< X >::iterator it = myset.find(x);
if (it != myset.end()) {
   // do something with *it
}

C++ 20

In C++20 set gets a contains function, so the following becomes possible as mentioned at: https://stackoverflow.com/a/54197839/895245

if (myset.contains(x)) {
  // x is in the set
} else {
  // no x 
}
  • 99
    Note that using count() instead of find() is never better but potentially worse. This is because find() will return after the first match, count() will always iterate over all elements. – Frerich Raabe Nov 9 '09 at 15:50
  • 30
    @Frerich that's only relevant for multiset and multimap I thought? Still good to point out though :) – Pieter Nov 9 '09 at 15:54
  • 78
    std::set is typically implemented with an ordered tree structure, so count() and find() will both have O(logn). Neither will iterate over all elements in the set. – Alan Nov 9 '09 at 16:41
  • 12
    @FrerichRaabe - Are you certain? Since it's only possible for set to contain one member that matches, wouldn't the function be implemented in such as way as to stop after locating the first element, in this case, as Pieter points out? Useful answer in any case! – Dan Nissenbaum Mar 27 '14 at 7:19
  • 13
    @DanNissenbaum Yes, you're exactly right (and so are +Peter and +Alan): for std::set, the two functions are equivalent in terms of performance. So even though the first part of my comment (count() never being faster than find()) still holds, the second part is indeed not applicable to std::set. However, I guess another argument can be made in favor of find(): it's more expressive, i.e. emphasizes that you're trying to find an element instead of counting the number of occurrances. – Frerich Raabe Mar 27 '14 at 8:19
38

Just to clarify, the reason why there is no member like contains() in these container types is because it would open you up to writing inefficient code. Such a method would probably just do a this->find(key) != this->end() internally, but consider what you do when the key is indeed present; in most cases you'll then want to get the element and do something with it. This means you'd have to do a second find(), which is inefficient. It's better to use find directly, so you can cache your result, like so:

auto it = myContainer.find(key);
if (it != myContainer.end())
{
    // Do something with it, no more lookup needed.
}
else
{
    // Key was not present.
}

Of course, if you don't care about efficiency, you can always roll your own, but in that case you probably shouldn't be using C++... ;)

  • 41
    What about sets? Usually you already have the element, but just want to check if it's in. – Elazar Leibovich Mar 15 '11 at 12:53
  • 8
    Do you have any reference to whether this is the actual reason such a method/function is not included in the stl, or is it just your educated guess? – Fabio A. Dec 2 '11 at 15:18
  • 2
    @FabioA. It's my educated guess. – Tim Dec 7 '11 at 20:38
  • 1
    @Adhemar, consistency isn't exactly the strong side of STL... (list::remove, remove(makes_sense_only_for_vector, iterators)...) – Elazar Leibovich Mar 11 '14 at 9:25
  • 3
    It does not make sense to me not to include a feature because someone might use it incorrectly if they did not know what they were doing. Programming is for people that can think for themselves and are responsible for their code and its performance – slawekwin Feb 13 '17 at 10:35
10

In C++20 we'll finally get std::set::contains method.

#include <iostream>
#include <string>
#include <set>

int main()
{
    std::set<std::string> example = {"Do", "not", "panic", "!!!"};

    if(example.contains("panic")) {
        std::cout << "Found\n";
    } else {
        std::cout << "Not found\n";
    }
}
6

If you were going to add a contains function, it might look like this:

#include <algorithm>
#include <iterator>

template<class TInputIterator, class T> inline
bool contains(TInputIterator first, TInputIterator last, const T& value)
{
    return std::find(first, last, value) != last;
}

template<class TContainer, class T> inline
bool contains(const TContainer& container, const T& value)
{
    // This works with more containers but requires std::begin and std::end
    // from C++0x, which you can get either:
    //  1. By using a C++0x compiler or
    //  2. Including the utility functions below.
    return contains(std::begin(container), std::end(container), value);

    // This works pre-C++0x (and without the utility functions below, but doesn't
    // work for fixed-length arrays.
    //return contains(container.begin(), container.end(), value);
}

template<class T> inline
bool contains(const std::set<T>& container, const T& value)
{
    return container.find(value) != container.end();
}

This works with std::set, other STL containers, and even fixed-length arrays:

void test()
{
    std::set<int> set;
    set.insert(1);
    set.insert(4);
    assert(!contains(set, 3));

    int set2[] = { 1, 2, 3 };
    assert(contains(set2, 3));
}

Edit:

As pointed out in the comments, I unintentionally used a function new to C++0x (std::begin and std::end). Here is the near-trivial implementation from VS2010:

namespace std {

template<class _Container> inline
    typename _Container::iterator begin(_Container& _Cont)
    { // get beginning of sequence
    return (_Cont.begin());
    }

template<class _Container> inline
    typename _Container::const_iterator begin(const _Container& _Cont)
    { // get beginning of sequence
    return (_Cont.begin());
    }

template<class _Container> inline
    typename _Container::iterator end(_Container& _Cont)
    { // get end of sequence
    return (_Cont.end());
    }

template<class _Container> inline
    typename _Container::const_iterator end(const _Container& _Cont)
    { // get end of sequence
    return (_Cont.end());
    }

template<class _Ty,
    size_t _Size> inline
    _Ty *begin(_Ty (&_Array)[_Size])
    { // get beginning of array
    return (&_Array[0]);
    }

template<class _Ty,
    size_t _Size> inline
    _Ty *end(_Ty (&_Array)[_Size])
    { // get end of array
    return (&_Array[0] + _Size);
    }

}
  • 1
    @Adhemar, it actually was inefficient, but not at all for the reason you mentioned. – Sam Harwell Nov 9 '09 at 16:58
  • @Paul: Make sure that you include the specialization for std::set, and remember that it's only appropriate if the only thing you need to know is existence. – Sam Harwell Nov 9 '09 at 17:00
  • @280Z28: std::begin(container)? What STL standard is that? It doesn't compile on my gcc. – stefaanv Nov 9 '09 at 17:07
  • @stefannv: heh, it's new for C++0x. I added the implementation from my compiler above. – Sam Harwell Nov 9 '09 at 17:13
  • 2
    @Adhemar: If you know the set contains a value, then you already the value. The only reason you'd need the iterator is to erase the element from the set. If all you need is to know whether or not a collection contains a value, then this solution is no less efficient than any other solution. – Sam Harwell Nov 9 '09 at 23:45
4

You can also check whether an element is in set or not while inserting the element. The single element version return a pair, with its member pair::first set to an iterator pointing to either the newly inserted element or to the equivalent element already in the set. The pair::second element in the pair is set to true if a new element was inserted or false if an equivalent element already existed.

For example: Suppose the set already has 20 as an element.

 std::set<int> myset;
 std::set<int>::iterator it;
 std::pair<std::set<int>::iterator,bool> ret;

 ret=myset.insert(20);
 if(ret.second==false)
 {
     //do nothing

 }
 else
 {
    //do something
 }

 it=ret.first //points to element 20 already in set.

If the element is newly inserted than pair::first will point to the position of new element in set.

2

Write your own:

template<class T>
bool checkElementIsInSet(const T& elem, const std::set<T>& container)
{
  return container.find(elem) != container.end();
}
  • 4
    just did so : template<class T> static inline bool contains(const std::set<T>& S, T x) { return (S.find(x) != S.end()); } – fulmicoton Nov 9 '09 at 14:02
  • 4
    @paul don't create static global functions. put your function in an anonymous namespace instead: that's the C++ way of creating functions that won't link into other compilation units. also, your T parameter should be a const reference, for const-correctness and for efficiency. – wilhelmtell Nov 9 '09 at 14:13
  • -1: Not templated and not at all in STL style. This is fine if you aren't using STL, but if you are using STL you should at least attempt to follow its standards. – Sam Harwell Nov 9 '09 at 16:37
  • 1
    @280Z28: I'm sorry that my code is not to your standards, I was just showing that if you don't like STL's interface, you can write your own. Jeez, not templated? How templated does it have to be? Your example looks fine, that doesn't mean that mine is bad. It is just more focused on the set as was asked by the OP. – stefaanv Nov 9 '09 at 16:52
  • 1
    @280Z28: I was just making a point. I thought that people would be intelligent enough to get the picture. – stefaanv Nov 9 '09 at 19:52
2

I use

if(!my_set.count(that_element)) //Element is present...
;

But it is not as efficient as

if(my_set.find(that_element)!=my_set.end()) ....;

My version only saves my time in writing the code. I prefer it this way for competitive coding.

  • Yes, count(). Anybody unable to grasp that an integer-returning function used in a Boolean expression is testing for non-zero is going to have many, many other travails in the great sea of C/C++ idioms. And, as noted above, really should be as efficient for sets, which was the question. – Ron Burk Mar 9 '18 at 22:33
0

I was able to write a general contains function for std::list and std::vector,

template<typename T>
bool contains( const list<T>& container, const T& elt )
{
  return find( container.begin(), container.end(), elt ) != container.end() ;
}

template<typename T>
bool contains( const vector<T>& container, const T& elt )
{
  return find( container.begin(), container.end(), elt ) != container.end() ;
}

// use:
if( contains( yourList, itemInList ) ) // then do something

This cleans up the syntax a bit.

But I could not use template template parameter magic to make this work arbitrary stl containers.

// NOT WORKING:
template<template<class> class STLContainer, class T>
bool contains( STLContainer<T> container, T elt )
{
  return find( container.begin(), container.end(), elt ) != container.end() ;
}

Any comments about improving the last answer would be nice.

  • Sorry I can't really write block code in comment but what about template<typename CONTAINER, typename CONTAINEE> bool contains(const CONTAINER& container, const CONTAINEE& needle) { return find(container.begin(), container.end(), needle) != container.end(); – fulmicoton May 4 '13 at 23:10
  • It's not working, because std::vector needs an additional allocator as template argument and std::set needs an allocator and a less template argument. These lines woulkd work: template<template<class,class> class STLContainer, class T, class A> bool contains( STLContainer<T,A> container, T elt ) { return find( container.begin(), container.end(), elt ) != container.end() ; } template<template<class,class,class> class STLContainer, class T, class L, class A> bool contains( STLContainer<T,A,L> container, T elt ) { return find( container.begin(), container.end(), elt ) != container.end() ; } – tgmath Sep 9 '13 at 11:35
0

//general Syntax

       set<int>::iterator ii = find(set1.begin(),set1.end(),"element to be searched");

/* in below code i am trying to find element 4 in and int set if it is present or not*/

set<int>::iterator ii = find(set1.begin(),set1.end(),4);
 if(ii!=set1.end())
 {
    cout<<"element found";
    set1.erase(ii);// in case you want to erase that element from set.
 }

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