6

How can I enforce the type of the fields in this struct?

#lang racket
(struct Car (model year))

I've tried using a contract (but since I'm new to racket, this one doesn't obviously work... :P)

(provide (contract-out
      [Car (string? integer? . -> . Car?)]))

Example: This succeds but it shouldn't...

(define my-car (Car 2008 "A3"))

Sadly, it doesn't seem to be written anywhere how to get this done.

6

I think you're hitting at least one, and maybe both of the following:

  1. Using (provide (contract-out ....)) means the contract applies only at the module boundary -- only for other modules that require this one. So if your test example was in the same module, the contract would not apply. Instead you can use define/contract to make a contract apply to the thing itself, both in the module where it is defined and outside if you provide it.

  2. There is a special form of contracts for structs, in which you specify a contract for each field. What you tried above is a contract just on the constructor function. Although that could be what you want, consider using the contract for the struct instead.

Combining both you could do:

;; Define the contract on the struct itself.
;; Contract is used even within this module.
(provide car)
(define-struct/contract car ([model string?]
                             [year integer?]))

If you did want the contract to apply only at the module boundary, then you would use:

;; Define the contract only as `provide`d.
;; Contract is used only for code `require`-ing this module.
(provide (contract-out (struct car ([model string?]
                                    [year integer?]))))
(struct car (model year))

p.s. FWIW in Racket the common style is not to capitalize a struct name -- car not Car.


Update: Just to illustrate the difference more clearly:

#lang racket

(module mod racket
  (provide car0)
  (define-struct/contract car0 ([model string?]
                                [year integer?]))

  (car0 "foo" "bar") ;; gives contract violation
                     ;; because contract on struct itself

  (struct car1 (model year))
  (provide (contract-out (struct car1 ([model string?]
                                       [year integer?]))))

  (car1 "foo" "bar") ;; does NOT give contract violation
                     ;; because contract only on the `provide`
  )

(require 'mod)
(car0 "foo" "bar") ;; gives contract violation
(car1 "foo" "bar") ;; gives contract violation
  • BTW a cool thing about contracts is that they are not limited to "types" in a C/C++ sense. For example if the automobile were invented in 1769, then your contract for year could be (and/c integer? (>/c 1768)) instead of just integer?. ;) – Greg Hendershott Jun 9 '13 at 17:23
  • Thanks a lot, it worked perfectly :) – TesX Jun 9 '13 at 18:31

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