6

I have a file with structure

12312
desc: bleh...
9938
desc: blah...
desc: bloh...
desc: blih...
desc: bluh...
9912
desc: blah...

and i want to move line which matches pattern "desc:" to previous line or delete '\n' in line which goes before every pattern "desc:".

desired output:

12312 desc: bleh...
9938 desc: blah... desc: bloh... desc: blih... desc: bluh... 
9912 desc: blah...

I've tried

awk '!/desc:/{
 printf "%s ",$0
 getline
 printf "%s \n",$0
}
/desc/{print}' file

with no result.

actually all the data is the output of awk -F\" '{print $4 "\t" $6}' maybe i can do something in the first place?

  • Can't get it: desc: blah... don't match 9912, but it moves to it. Can you clarify your question? – PoGibas Jun 10 '13 at 10:33
  • i want to move line which matches pattern "desc:" to previous line or delete '\n' in line which goes before every pattern "desc:". – Igor Voltaic Jun 10 '13 at 10:35
  • Using getline is usually the wrong approach, and it certainly is in this case. Don't even think about using getline until you've read awk.info/?tip/getline and FULLY understand all the caveats. – Ed Morton Jun 10 '13 at 12:36
13

sed oneliner

sed ':a $!N;s/\ndesc/ desc/;ta P;D'

Will output

12312 desc: bleh...
9938 desc: blah... desc: bloh... desc: blih... desc: bluh...
9912 desc: blah...
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12

One way with awk:

$ awk '!/^desc:/&&NR>1{print OFS}{printf "%s ",$0}END{print OFS}' file
12312 desc: bleh...
9938 desc: blah... desc: bloh... desc: blih... desc: bluh...
9912 desc: blah...

Explanation:

  • !/^desc:/ match lines that don't start with desc: not including the first line in the file NR>1.
  • {print OFS} print an output field separator before the matched line. In awk the default OFS is \n.
  • {printf "%s ",$0} print every line without a trailing newline.
  • END{print OFS} after the file has been read add a trailing newline.

Live demo: http://ideone.com/ajH14u

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  • cant u explain please. i dont ge the same result. actually all the data is the output of awk -F\" '{print $4 "\t" $6}' – Igor Voltaic Jun 10 '13 at 10:43
  • @IgorVoltaic I have added a explanation. It doesn't matter where the data came from as long as it's in the format describe in the question this will work. Saying you don't get the same results doesn't help. – Chris Seymour Jun 10 '13 at 11:03
  • 3
    END{print OFS} will add a blank to the end of each line, use END{print ""} to only print a newline. You're also adding a second blank to the end of every line by using printf "%s ",$0 instead of printf " %s",$0 but you'd need to rethink the script logic to address that. – Ed Morton Jun 10 '13 at 12:48
4
$ cat file
12312
desc: bleh...
9938
desc: blah...
desc: bloh...
desc: blih...
desc: bluh...
9912
desc: blah...

$ awk '{printf "%s%s",(/^desc:/?OFS:ors),$0; ors=ORS} END{print ""}' file
12312 desc: bleh...
9938 desc: blah... desc: bloh... desc: blih... desc: bluh...
9912 desc: blah...
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  • 1
    @Jaypal - it's the common awk way to deal with joining lines. You either need to print an ORS (or nothing if it's the first line in the input) or an OFS before each line based on if it's the first line in the block or a subsequent line so you just use a ternary expression to capture the condition that distinguishes the first from subsequent lines in a block. – Ed Morton Jun 10 '13 at 12:52
  • True, it's just the use of ternary operator inside of printf is excellent. – jaypal singh Jun 10 '13 at 12:55
3

Perl solution:

perl -pe 's/\n/ /; ! /^desc:/ and print "\n" unless 1 == $.' FILE
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  • 1
    Wouldn't it be more intuitive with print "\n" unless 1 == $. || /^desc:/? – doubleDown Jun 10 '13 at 13:26
  • I assume ! /^desc:/ and print "\n" unless 1 == $. means if desc is not found then print a newline unless there's one only field on the line. That's a pretty nasty statement wrt comprehension as it's got at least a couple of negatives in it. Isn't there a clearer way to write that? I see a suggestion of print "\n" unless 1 == $. || /^desc:/ in a comment but can't you just write something clear and simple like if ($. > 1 || /^desc:/) print "\n" in perl? I don't even know if that's interpreting the original perl intent correctly. – Ed Morton Jun 10 '13 at 15:09
  • Well, this demostrates how I got there: I started with and, noticed the empty line at the beginning, so added the unless. – choroba Jun 10 '13 at 19:50
1

Using

Content of script.vim:

set backup
g/\v^desc/ normal kJ
saveas! output.txt
q!

Run it like:

vim -u NONE -N -S script.vim infile

And it will create an output.txt file with content:

12312 desc: bleh...
9938 desc: blah...  desc: bloh...  desc: blih...  desc: bluh...
9912 desc: blah...
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