76

Does anyone know how to convert an Excel date to a correct Unix timestamp?

  • What do you mean by an "excel date"? Do you mean text formatted as a human-readable date-time string like "11/09/2009 3:23:24 PM"? – Matt Ball Nov 9 '09 at 20:23
  • 4
    Don't forget that on January 19, 2038 the Unix Time Stamp will cease to work due to a 32-bit overflow. Before this moment millions of applications will need to either adopt a new convention for time stamps or be migrated to 64-bit systems which will buy the time stamp a "bit" more time. – user428500 Aug 23 '10 at 14:23
  • 13
    more like 32bits more time. – user606723 Sep 15 '11 at 16:55
96

Non of these worked for me... when I converted the timestamp back it's 4 years off.

This worked perfectly: =(A2-DATE(1970,1,1))*86400

Credit goes to: Filip Czaja http://fczaja.blogspot.ca

Original Post: http://fczaja.blogspot.ca/2011/06/convert-excel-date-into-timestamp.html

  • 1
    Same here, and this is much easier to read – Roy Truelove Apr 3 '13 at 13:13
  • 5
    Don't forget your time zone (unless you're in UTC and not observing Summer Time). UNIX epoch is agnostic to the time zone whereas spreadsheets are not. Here is a guide with examples. – Adam Katz Jun 25 '15 at 2:34
  • GMT+8: =((A1+28800)/86400)+25569 – Ivan Chau Jan 19 '16 at 3:10
  • current time for CDT (central daylight time): =(NOW()-DATE(1970,1,1))*86400 + 5*3600 – hBrent May 12 '16 at 22:51
  • 1
    @tonygil It'll work if the cells you're targeting are actually dates in Excel. If it's text that's supposed to represent a date all bets are off. – Casey Dec 18 '17 at 16:09
66

Windows and Mac Excel (2011):

Unix Timestamp = (Excel Timestamp - 25569) * 86400
Excel Timestamp =  (Unix Timestamp / 86400) + 25569

MAC OS X (2007):

Unix Timestamp = (Excel Timestamp - 24107) * 86400
Excel Timestamp =  (Unix Timestamp / 86400) + 24107

For Reference:

86400 = Seconds in a day
25569 = Days between 1970/01/01 and 1900/01/01 (min date in Windows Excel)
24107 = Days between 1970/01/01 and 1904/01/02 (min date in Mac Excel 2007)
  • 3
    Office 2011 on Mac seems to work fine with the "Windows" version of these formulas. The "Mac" versions are way off on it. – radicand Feb 11 '13 at 21:46
  • 1
    I think you've reversed the excel and unix timestamps in those formulas. The Unix timestamp a number of seconds, and so needs to be divided by 86400, rather than the excel timestamp, which is what the formulas say. See @radicand's answer. – Mike Houston Feb 19 '13 at 11:59
  • Thanks for the comments, tested this on Mac Excel 2011 and it looks like they are the same as the Windows version. – Jeff Wu Feb 19 '13 at 18:20
  • 2
    Great, this formulas works even without excel!!! +1 – Luis Siquot Jul 1 '13 at 14:57
  • Is there a way to transform a unix timstamp in millisecond to datetime, preserving the milliseconds? – Lorenzo Belli May 25 '17 at 10:53
11

If we assume the date in Excel is in A1 cell formatted as Date and the Unix timestamp should be in a A2 cell formatted as number the formula in A2 should be:

= (A1 * 86400) - 2209075200

where:

86400 is the number of seconds in the day 2209075200 is the number of seconds between 1900-01-01 and 1970-01-01 which are the base dates for Excel and Unix timestamps.

The above is true for Windows. On Mac the base date in Excel is 1904-01-01 and the seconds number should be corrected to: 2082844800

  • It doesn't work exactly on windows at least. It is off by 19 hours. – LLBBL Aug 19 '11 at 15:55
  • 4
    So it should be this: = (A1 * 86400) - 2209143600 – LLBBL Aug 19 '11 at 15:59
  • 2
    Mac Excel default date base is 1904 whereas in Windows Excel it is 1900, but you can change the date base in Mac Excel by unchecking "use 1904 date system" under preferences/calculation, then it works like windows excel. – Cloudranger Feb 6 '13 at 16:02
6

Here is a mapping for reference, assuming UTC for spreadsheet systems like Microsoft Excel:

                         Unix  Excel Mac    Excel    Human Date  Human Time
Excel Epoch       -2209075200      -1462        0    1900/01/00* 00:00:00 (local)
Excel ≤ 2011 Mac† -2082758400          0     1462    1904/12/31  00:00:00 (local)
Unix Epoch                  0      24107    25569    1970/01/01  00:00:00 UTC
Example Below      1234567890      38395.6  39857.6  2009/02/13  23:31:30 UTC
Signed Int Max     2147483648      51886    50424    2038/01/19  03:14:08 UTC

One Second                  1       0.0000115740…             —  00:00:01
One Hour                 3600       0.0416666666…             ―  01:00:00
One Day                 86400          1        1             ―  24:00:00

*  “Jan Zero, 1900” is 1899/12/31; see the Bug section below. Excel 2011 for Mac (and older) use the 1904 date system.

 

As I often use awk to process CSV and space-delimited content, I developed a way to convert UNIX epoch to timezone/DST-appropriate Excel date format:

echo 1234567890 |awk '{ 
  # tries GNU date, tries BSD date on failure
  cmd = sprintf("date -d@%d +%%z 2>/dev/null || date -jf %%s %d +%%z", $1, $1)
  cmd |getline tz                                # read in time-specific offset
  hours = substr(tz, 2, 2) + substr(tz, 4) / 60  # hours + minutes (hi, India)
  if (tz ~ /^-/) hours *= -1                     # offset direction (east/west)
  excel = $1/86400 + hours/24 + 25569            # as days, plus offset
  printf "%.9f\n", excel
}'

I used echo for this example, but you can pipe a file where the first column (for the first cell in .csv format, call it as awk -F,) is a UNIX epoch. Alter $1 to represent your desired column/cell number or use a variable instead.

This makes a system call to date. If you will reliably have the GNU version, you can remove the 2>/dev/null || date … +%%z and the second , $1. Given how common GNU is, I wouldn't recommend assuming BSD's version.

The getline reads the time zone offset outputted by date +%z into tz, which is then translated into hours. The format will be like -0700 (PDT) or +0530 (IST), so the first substring extracted is 07 or 05, the second is 00 or 30 (then divided by 60 to be expressed in hours), and the third use of tz sees whether our offset is negative and alters hours if needed.

The formula given in all of the other answers on this page is used to set excel, with the addition of the daylight-savings-aware time zone adjustment as hours/24.

If you're on an older version of Excel for Mac, you'll need to use 24107 in place of 25569 (see the mapping above).

To convert any arbitrary non-epoch time to Excel-friendly times with GNU date:

echo "last thursday" |awk '{ 
  cmd = sprintf("date -d \"%s\" +\"%%s %%z\"", $0)
  cmd |getline
  hours = substr($2, 2, 2) + substr($2, 4) / 60
  if ($2 ~ /^-/) hours *= -1
  excel = $1/86400 + hours/24 + 25569
  printf "%.9f\n", excel
}'

This is basically the same code, but the date -d no longer has an @ to represent unix epoch (given how capable the string parser is, I'm actually surprised the @ is mandatory; what other date format has 9-10 digits?) and it's now asked for two outputs: the epoch and the time zone offset. You could therefore use e.g. @1234567890 as an input.

Bug

Lotus 1-2-3 (the original spreadsheet software) intentionally treated 1900 as a leap year despite the fact that it was not (this reduced the codebase at a time when every byte counted). Microsoft Excel retained this bug for compatibility, skipping day 60 (the fictitious 1900/02/29), retaining Lotus 1-2-3's mapping of day 59 to 1900/02/28. LibreOffice instead assigned day 60 to 1900/02/28 and pushed all previous days back one.

Any date before 1900/03/01 could be as much as a day off:

Day        Excel   LibreOffice
-1            -1    1899/12/29
 0    1900/01/00*   1899/12/30
 1    1900/01/01    1899/12/31
 2    1900/01/02    1900/01/01
 …
59    1900/02/28    1900/02/27
60    1900/02/29(!) 1900/02/28
61    1900/03/01    1900/03/01

Excel doesn't acknowledge negative dates and has a special definition of the Zeroth of January (1899/12/31) for day zero. Internally, Excel does indeed handle negative dates (they're just numbers after all), but it displays them as numbers since it doesn't know how to display them as dates (nor can it convert older dates into negative numbers). Feb 29 1900, a day that never happened, is recognized by Excel but not LibreOffice.

3

Because my edits to the above were rejected (did any of you actually try?), here's what you really need to make this work:

Windows (And Mac Office 2011+):

  • Unix Timestamp = (Excel Timestamp - 25569) * 86400
  • Excel Timestamp = (Unix Timestamp / 86400) + 25569

MAC OS X (pre Office 2011):

  • Unix Timestamp = (Excel Timestamp - 24107) * 86400
  • Excel Timestamp = (Unix Timestamp / 86400) + 24107
2

You're apparently off by one day, exactly 86400 seconds. Use the number 2209161600 Not the number 2209075200 If you Google the two numbers, you'll find support for the above. I tried your formula but was always coming up 1 day different from my server. It's not obvious from the unix timestamp unless you think in unix instead of human time ;-) but if you double check then you'll see this might be correct.

  • This is correct, due to Excel calculating the first year as a leap year even though it isn't. – ANisus Sep 9 '11 at 9:27
  • I can confirm the magic number is indeed 2209161600, this being 1970-01-01 - 1900-01-01 + 1 day * 86400. If you enter 1900-01-01 in excel and save as sylk format and look at the file in a text editor you will see it saves that date as 1 instead of zero as it should, which is why you have to add 1 day – Cloudranger Feb 6 '13 at 15:59
1

I had an old Excel database with "human-readable" dates, like 2010.03.28 20:12:30 Theese dates were in UTC+1 (CET) and needed to convert it to epoch time.

I used the =(A4-DATE(1970;1;1))*86400-3600 formula to convert the dates to epoch time from the A column to B column values. Check your timezone offset and make a math with it. 1 hour is 3600 seconds.

The only thing why i write here an anwser, you can see that this topic is more than 5 years old is that i use the new Excel versions and also red posts in this topic, but they're incorrect. The DATE(1970;1;1). Here the 1970 and the January needs to be separated with ; and not with ,

If you're also experiencing this issue, hope it helps you. Have a nice day :)

0

None of the current answers worked for me because my data was in this format from the unix side:

2016-02-02 19:21:42 UTC

I needed to convert this to Epoch to allow referencing other data which had epoch timestamps.

  1. Create a new column for the date part and parse with this formula

    =DATEVALUE(MID(A2,6,2) & "/" & MID(A2,9,2) & "/" & MID(A2,1,4)) 
    
  2. As other Grendler has stated here already, create another column

    =(B2-DATE(1970,1,1))*86400 
    
  3. Create another column with just the time added together to get total seconds:

    =(VALUE(MID(A2,12,2))*60*60+VALUE(MID(A2,15,2))*60+VALUE(MID(A2,18,2)))
    
  4. Create a last column that just adds the last two columns together:

    =C2+D2
    
0

Here's my ultimate answer to this.

Also apparently javascript's new Date(year, month, day) constructor doesn't account for leap seconds too.

// Parses an Excel Date ("serial") into a
// corresponding javascript Date in UTC+0 timezone.
//
// Doesn't account for leap seconds.
// Therefore is not 100% correct.
// But will do, I guess, since we're
// not doing rocket science here.
//
// https://www.pcworld.com/article/3063622/software/mastering-excel-date-time-serial-numbers-networkdays-datevalue-and-more.html
// "If you need to calculate dates in your spreadsheets,
//  Excel uses its own unique system, which it calls Serial Numbers".
//
lib.parseExcelDate = function (excelSerialDate) {
  // "Excel serial date" is just
  // the count of days since `01/01/1900`
  // (seems that it may be even fractional).
  //
  // The count of days elapsed
  // since `01/01/1900` (Excel epoch)
  // till `01/01/1970` (Unix epoch).
  // Accounts for leap years
  // (19 of them, yielding 19 extra days).
  const daysBeforeUnixEpoch = 70 * 365 + 19;

  // An hour, approximately, because a minute
  // may be longer than 60 seconds, see "leap seconds".
  const hour = 60 * 60 * 1000;

  // "In the 1900 system, the serial number 1 represents January 1, 1900, 12:00:00 a.m.
  //  while the number 0 represents the fictitious date January 0, 1900".
  // These extra 12 hours are a hack to make things
  // a little bit less weird when rendering parsed dates.
  // E.g. if a date `Jan 1st, 2017` gets parsed as
  // `Jan 1st, 2017, 00:00 UTC` then when displayed in the US
  // it would show up as `Dec 31st, 2016, 19:00 UTC-05` (Austin, Texas).
  // That would be weird for a website user.
  // Therefore this extra 12-hour padding is added
  // to compensate for the most weird cases like this
  // (doesn't solve all of them, but most of them).
  // And if you ask what about -12/+12 border then
  // the answer is people there are already accustomed
  // to the weird time behaviour when their neighbours
  // may have completely different date than they do.
  //
  // `Math.round()` rounds all time fractions
  // smaller than a millisecond (e.g. nanoseconds)
  // but it's unlikely that an Excel serial date
  // is gonna contain even seconds.
  //
  return new Date(Math.round((excelSerialDate - daysBeforeUnixEpoch) * 24 * hour) + 12 * hour);
};

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